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Let’s Meet at Stanford Medicine X!

I’ve given speeches and master courses at several Medicine X events in the past and I’m honored to be invited again for this year’s Medicine X! All I can tell now is that I “might” give a keynote and give some master courses about very exciting topics.

Please register as soon as possible because the event gets full very fast. See you there this September!

Medicine X is a catalyst for new ideas about the future of medicine and health care. The initiative explores how emerging technologies will advance the practice of medicine, improve health, and empower patients to be active participants in their own care. The “X” is meant to encourage thinking beyond numbers and trends—it represents the infinite possibilities for current and future information technologies to improve health. Under the direction of Dr. Larry Chu, Associate Professor of Anesthesia, Medicine X is a project of the Stanford AIM Lab.

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62 Science Fiction Movies in 4 Minutes!

The Singularity Hub shared a fantastic video about the 62 major science fiction movies from the early 20th century. A must-see for all sci-fi lovers!

Here is the complete list of movies mentioned in the video:

1902- Voyage dans la lune
1927- Metropolis
1929- Fraud in Mond
1931- Frankenstein
1933-The invisible Man
1936-The Devil Doll
1951- The Day the earth Stood still
1953- The War of the worlds
1956- Forbidden Planet
1956- Invasion of the Body Snatchers
1957- The incredible Shrinking Man
1960- The Time Machine
1960- The village of the damned
1966- Fahrenheit 451
1968- A space Odissey
1968- Planet of the Apes
1971- A Clockwork Orange
1972- Solaris
1973- Fantastic Planet
1974- Soylent Green
1977- Close encounters of the third Kind
1977- Star Wars: episode IV, a new hope
1979- Alien
1979- Stalker
1980- Star Wars: episode V, the empire strikes back
1982- Blade Runner
1982- E.T.
1982- The Thing
1982- Tron
1984- Terminator
1985- Back to the future
1985- Brazil
1986- The Fly
1987- Predator
1987- Robocop
1989- Back to the future II
1990- Total Recall
1991- Terminator II
1993- Jurassic Park
1995- Ghost in the Shell
1995- Twelve Monkeys
1997- Abre los ojos
1997- Cube
1997- Gattaca
1997- The fifht element
1999- The Matrix
1999- Being Jhon Malcovich
2001- Donnie Darko
2002-1988 Akira (Blu-Ray, remaster) not in release order
2002- Minority Report
2005- V for Vendetta
2006- Children of Men
2008- Wall-e
2009- Avatar
2009- District-9
2009- Moon
2009- Watchmen
2010- Inception
2011- Super-8
2013- Star Trek Into Darkness
2013- Gravity
2013- Her (only voice)

Running Tips For Geeks: Wearable Devices and Smartphone Apps

It’s really hard to find motivation to go out for a run or to do exercises every single day. I struggle with that, just like you. I only go out for a run if I can measure data, I’m a geek. Here are the wearable devices and smartphone apps that help me find the motivation I need.

What Should Hospitals Look Like In The Future?

How do you start when the goal is to design the hospital of the future? When I was writing this chapter for my new book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, I contacted talented architects, as well as organizations such as NXT Health focusing on this sensitive topic and shared my own views as well.

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Here are a few things from the top of my mind as excerpts from the book:

  • No waiting time will harden the lives of patients as cognitive computers will organize all the details of the healthcare system. It will direct people when and where to go by analyzing their records, and automatically responding to doctors’ notes and prescriptions.
  • Extrapolating from today’s trends, it is clear sophisticaed surgical robots will rule the scenes of operating rooms (ORs), although not all ORs will include surgical robots as there will still be operations that could not be performed using only robots.
  • Devices and equipment of radiology, surgery and many other specialties from CT scans to endoscopic technologies will be so small they would all fit in the OR.
  • Cameras will record every movement in the OR as robots will be controlled from a different, sometimes distant locations. Examples are already available, e.g. in the Radboud Medical Centre.
  • Using radiology images such as CT or MRI scans ot patients, surgeons will be able to look into the body and even organs of patients before the operation for better surgical planning and during the operation for more precise movements. Augmented reality in action.
  • It will only include materials that cannot be infected; flexible touchscreens featuring important health data will be around the bed which will be controlled by the patient.
  • The walls might include virtual reality to make sure the patient feels literally at home by showing them images and pictures from their home which they can upload to the system while lying in a hospital bed.
  • Waiting rooms will feature charging sets for wearable devices where data could also be exported before the visit.

Here is how NXT Health thinks about the future of patient rooms:

A canopy above the bed houses electrical, technical, and gas components, even a noise–blocking system. A Halo light box can be programmed for mood and light therapy, and also serving as screen to display clouds or the sky. The head panel contains equipment that can measure almost any health parameter unobtrusively while continually logging results. The footwall features a screen for entertainment, video consultations, and accessing whatever information the patient needs. Floors are made of low–porosity rubber that does not need chemical sealers and does not trap bacteria and other substances. In case of a fall it reduces impact.

To reduce potential infections all surfaces are made of solid materials that are often used in kitchen countertops. A light at the entrance reminds staff to wash their hands before entering the room. Information and data can be added to patient records here as well as at a control panel.

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Although not all advantages will be the consequences of ever improving technologies but a different kind of training for the staff:

The Walnut Hill Medical Center in Dallas has been referred to as the Apple experience hospital due to its design and innovative nature. Potential employees must take a psychological exam, and the application process is exceptionally tough. Patient greeting begin in the parking lot with complementary valet service. Inside, the staff follows the Ritz Carlton “15–5” rule meaning that a hospital employee must smile at the patient from 15 feet and greet them with a warm hello at 5 feet. All employees are trained to communicate properly with patients and their families. Patient rooms feature large windows that provide natural light and pleasuring views.

Read more about the hospital of the future and what examplary hospitals operate today in The Guide to the Future of Medicine.

And as a bonus, here is how people in the 1950s saw the future of hospitals:

What Question Does Excite You the Most About the Future of Medicine?

I have amazing conversations on social media with people from around the world about where technology leads us in medicine and healthcare in the coming years. As I give around 90 talks per year, I also receive fantastic questions from the audience from time to time and I started listing these.

Now I would love to hear what question excites you the most about the future of medicine! Will we print organs or will robots replace doctors? Anything else? Please leave a comment here or submit your question on medicalfuturist.com.

The questions will be used anonymously for an upcoming and very exciting project which I will share more details about soon. Thank you!

Medical Doctor holding a world globe in her hands as medical network concept

Will Robots Replace Doctors?

It is quite obvious, based on my previous posts, that I think cognitive computing will play a major role in the future of diagnostics. See these examples:

Now MobileHealthGlobal.com asked me to share my views on this:

In fact, these machines, which are also called cognitive computers, have the advantage of allowing the doctor to focus all of his or her attention on the patient, instead of having to concentrate on finding information. Thus, to combine human and artificial intelligence is key. Meskó defends that “the best potential pair is a human with technology.”

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Iodine: Better information about medications

I met Thomas Goetz at Google years ago and he provided me with excellent advice about my future. Then I read his book, followed his path and was glad to see him as entrepreneur-in-residence at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Now he came up with Iodine, a site with huge potentials. A few things they offer:

  • Drug reviews
  • Side effect database
  • What to expect from a specific drug
  • Compare drugs to each other
  • Popular medications
  • Medical Translator extension for Chrome
  • How people feel about certain medications

Check it out!

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