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Behind the Scenes of Medical Blogs: Six Until Me

This month, I’m going to present about a dozen of famous medical bloggers to you. My aim is to get my readers closer to these quality blogs and the bloggers as well. I’d like to convince more and more health professionals/people interested in medicine to create their own blogs by providing interesting “behind-the-scenes” interviews. The second blogger in this series is Kerri Morrone at Six Until Me who has been blogging about her fight with diabetes since 2005.

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  • You’re the only patient blogger in this series, because no one could do it more professionally. Own design, own system. Do the other patients appreciate what you’ve done through your blog?

Producing the content for Six Until Me has been completely fun. Writing comes naturally to me. Designing and maintaining the website myself has been a bit more of a challenge. (Like when my blog ate it’s own archives and refused to allow me to access the blogging platform. I think I made up my own curse words that day.) Forcing my brain to think in terms of webdesign and coding is completely against my nature. If I could use crayons and draw directly on my computer screen, I would. :)

Other people living with diabetes have been wonderfully supportive of my efforts with Six Until Me. I started this blog because I felt I was the only diabetic for miles – blogging helped me connect with others and feel less alone with my disease. The impact on my health and my life in general has been tremendous. So when you ask, “Do other patients appreciate what you’ve done,” I can’t help but counter back with – “Do they know how much I appreciate them?”

  • How do you find information for your blog? You certainly read other blogs, journals but do you use RSS reader? How many blogs do you track?

I am the biggest blog-hopper in town. I built my blogroll so I could click like a little rabbit all over the blogosphere. I usually check about 20 – 30 diabetes-related sites a day but often find myself over in a completely random, non-diabetes related corner of the internet. I network through a collection of over 250 diabetes-specific sites, touching any given number of them on any day.

As far as information for my blog goes, I subscribe to several diabetes newswires for my job at dLife, so I have access to much of the latest in diabetes news. Most of my blog material, however, comes straight from my daily life with diabetes. When you are living with a disease like diabetes, which requires daily maintenance and vigilance, you can’t help but stumble upon plenty of life experience to blog about.

  • You maintain a Your Story section (web 2.0 rules!) where the readers can send you their stories. How often do you get a story? Do you have to moderate any?

I receive several Your Story segments a week – it’s truly an honor and a pleasure to be able to bring the experiences of other people onto my blog. I hear from the parents of kids with diabetes, people living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, people who have a loved one with diabetes, and even just those who have stumbled across the blog and are just plain curious. The range of voices is incredible.

As far as editing, I don’t edit the stories (unless there is a glaring typo or something that is intended for my eyes only) and instead give the writers complete storytelling freedom. It is their story, after all.

  • Do you know why some of the physicians are afraid of patient bloggers? Because they could write about or rate them. Do you write about your doctor?

The best part of being a blogger is that the only force editing me is me. :) Blogs, particularly patient-authored blogs, are some of the most honest accounts of health conditions on the internet. We are the faces of these diseases, the target markets for so many advertisers, and points of solace for people who are sharing our common bond. Write about a doctor? Sure. I’m honest, but fair.

  • You maintain a great Flickr photo collection, you tell you readers about your fights with diabetes. Aren’t you afraid of making your life totally public?

Ah, but that’s the tricky part – my life isn’t totally public. There are so many parts of my life that never even whisper close to Six Until Me. I share so many of my experiences with diabetes, but my whole life isn’t diabetes. Some bits of my life are just for me. :)

  • Do you get e-mails from companies working on diabetic tools/services?

I receive correspondence from several companies and focus groups working on diabetes-specific tools and services. I feel very lucky to have access to this burgeoning technology and I enjoy reviewing products, assisting design teams, and doing whatever I can to help soldier on towards a cure and contribute to a better life for people with diabetes.

As a patient with a chronic illness, I am responsible for much of my disease management. Sure, my doctors offer tools and medical tests, but the day-to-day management of diabetes remains my responsibility. From tesing my blood sugar several times a day to priming my insulin pump, the maintenance tasks of diabetes require a lot of my attention. Web 2.0 – specifically HealthWeb 2.0 – gives a web-savvy patient access to disease management tools that can make diabetes daily management a bit easier. And I’m all for anything that makes diabetes a bit easier to deal with. :)

  • At last, what are your future plans with your blog?

I started Six Until Me in May of 2005 because I was tired of Googling “diabetes” and coming up with little more than a list of complications and frightening stories. Where were all the people who were living with this disease, like I have been since I was a little girl? Was I the only diabetic out there who felt alone?

Blogging helped me find the others out there who were living with diabetes, just like me.

I’m excited to expand the blog to include more voices from the diabetes community, raising awareness and sharing their stories. Blogging, for me, is about connecting with other people, finding hope and inspiration within our own diabetes lives.

Thank you Kerri for being so kind and helpful during the interview. You’re one of, if not the best example for patient bloggers. Check out Six Until Me for more infos on diabetes!

Interviews so far:

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13 Comments Post a comment
  1. David #

    Wow both beautiful and smart. You don’t get that a lot…
    “What do you think about the patient-community sites (Sugarstats.com ; MDjunction.com, etc.)? How much can web 2.0 be helpful for patients?”
    This I the kind of question I would be happy read the answers of all the Bloggers. On one hand, these community sites present a lot of problems in people making non-medical decisions and an entry point for tricky advertisers, but on the other hand – it seems that many people can truly gain power and knowledge in there.
    I’m not sure what the best answer is. (and thanks for introducing http://www.mdjunction.com – I never saw it before, its nice!)

    August 13, 2007
  2. Thank you, David! I plan to ask that question many times in the next interviews.

    August 13, 2007
  3. Kerri rocks!

    August 13, 2007
  4. Kerri’s blog is among the best ones in the diabetes space. I visit it very often and it’s frequently the source of inspiration and motivation for those of us that live with diabetes.

    On a side note, with regards to patient-community sites, I wanted to mention http://TuDiabetes.com (and http://EsTuDiabetes.com, en español), a community for people touched by diabetes from all over the world. Kerri is among the members. If you want to talk a bit more about the community, I am available too. :)

    August 13, 2007
  5. Hello Manny! I’m going to write a post about this great community. Thanks for the link!

    August 13, 2007
  6. Great interview indeed! Kerri is at the top of my RSS reader as well, I’m always looking forward to reading her thoughts. Good questions Bertalan.

    I think it is a huge shift we’re coming upon in regard to ePHR, online health management and “Health 2.0″. We’re giving people the tools to better empower themselves and take control. It is a great time indeed and I think we’re going to see this space get bigger as more and more people “take the reins”.

    August 14, 2007
  7. Thank you, Marston, for the kind words!

    You maintain one of the best web 2.0 based patient-community sites. Online health management needs even more time. We must be patient as most of the people (I mean patients themselves) don’t even know about web 2.0.

    August 14, 2007
  8. Colt #

    hi i enjoyed the read

    August 19, 2007

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. Behind the Scenes of Medical Blogs: Healthbolt.net « ScienceRoll
  2. Blogabetes: Bloggers about Diabetes! « ScienceRoll
  3. Web 2.0 Resources for Patients Dealing with Diabetes « ScienceRoll
  4. Behind the Scenes of Medical Blogs: Diabetes Mine « ScienceRoll
  5. Behind the Scenes of Medical Blogs: Scott Shreeve « ScienceRoll

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