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Personalized Medicine: Who would you like to have access to your genetic test results?

I still try to provide up-to-date information about personalized genetics, one of the “hypest” fields of medicine, so here are again some interesting articles and blogposts for your pleasure:

Personalized medicine uses information about a person’s genetic makeup to tailor products that will detect, treat, or prevent disease in that person. The goal is to get the best medical outcomes by choosing treatments that work well with a person’s genetic profile, or with certain characteristics in the person’s blood or cells.

For any single disease, thousands of genes and proteins that interact with each other are studied and tested. These numbers produce “vast amounts of data that needs to be interpreted and analyzed so that the components involved with diseases can be isolated and identified…

The fear is that genetic profiling will eliminate that favorite term of health economists – adverse selection – which keeps health insurance premiums reasonable for many people.

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We don’t quite understand which biomarkers are the right ones. There are multiple prognostic tests for breast cancer. Which one is more robust? In the end it depends as much on the classifiers used as it does on the gene expression signature.

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Follow Scienceroll for more about personalized genetics and don’t miss tomorrow’s Gene Genie edition at The Gene Sherpa who will definitely feature some similar articles.

Related articles:

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2 Comments Post a comment
  1. Ian #

    I had a blood test a few years ago that revealed I have a balanced reciprocal translocation between two of my chromosomes. I was wondering whether patients are normally allowed access to all the technical results of such tests, or is this information not generally shared with non-health professionals?

    October 6, 2007

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