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Personalized Genomics in the News

I would like to share three papers, articles that focus on the personalized genomics market with you. Almost 3 years ago, I wrote about that FDA had suggested two genetic markers to be used to determine the minimal starting dose of Coumadin. Later, in a paper, Rosove et al. said that “The value and cost-effectiveness of genetic testing to reduce bleeding or thrombosis rates remain unknown.”

Well, now it seems there is the answer.

Patients who received a test of two genes connected to warfarin sensitivity were 28 percent less likely to be hospitalized for a bleeding episode or blood clot than those whose safe and effective warfarin dosing was determined by traditional trial and error method.

Also researchers have provided the first published example of genome-scale RNA and DNA sequencing of a tumour to aid in clinical decision making and therapeutic choice.

“Utilizing a complete map of the molecular changes within a tumour in a clinical setting represents a world first in the application of this technology,” says Dr. Steven Jones, associate director of the Genome Sciences Centre and professor, Simon Fraser University. “It ushers in the era of personalized medicine in oncology, whereby therapies will be tailored precisely to the genetic make-up of the tumour. I anticipate that in the not too distant future nearly all patient tumours will be characterized in this way as a matter of course.”

And Health Populi reported a very interesting correlation between DTC ads, genetic pre-disposition, and healthy decisions:

A team of researchers now finds that DTC can play an important, positive role in motivating health consumers to adopt healthy behaviors. “The intention to engage in healthy lifestyles was strengthened by exposure to familial risk cues in DTC ads and this effect was mediated through enhanced efficacy to take healthy actions,” the paper concludes. Familial risk cues engendered positive self-efficacy.

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