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20 Potential Technological Advances in the Future of Medicine: Part II.

e-skin

As I mentioned in the first part of this series, the job of a medical futurist is to give a good summary of the ongoing projects and detect the ones with the biggest potential to be used in everyday medical practices and to determine the future of medicine. Here is the second part of the list of 20 technological advances:

11) Switching from long and extremely expensive clinical trials to tiny microchips which can be used as models of human organs or whole physiological systems provides clear advantages. Drugs or components could be tested on these without limitations which would make clinical trials faster and even more accurate (in each case the conditions and circumstances would be the same). The picture below shows a microchip with living cells that models how a lung works. Obviously, we need more complicated microchips that can mimic the whole human body, but this ultimate solution will arrive soon.

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12) Medical students will study anatomy on virtual dissection tables and not on human cadavers. What we studied in small textbooks will be transformed into virtual 3D solutions and models using augmented reality. We can observe, change and create anatomical models as fast as we want, as well as analyze structures in every detail. Examples include Anatomage, ImageVis3D and 4DAnatomy.

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13) Optogenetics will provide new solutions in therapies. A recent study published in Science reported that scientists were able to create false memories in the hippocampus of mice. This is the first time fear memory was generated via artificial means. By time, we will understand the placebo effect clearly; and just imagine the outcomes we can reach when false memories of taking drugs can be generated in humans as well. The idea is a bit futuristic, but the basics of the method are almost available now.

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14) With the growing number of elderly patients, introducing robot assistants to care homes and hospitals is inevitable. It could be a fair solution from moving patients to performing basic procedures. The robot in the picture below is the prototype made by a company based in California that aims at combining robotics and image-analysis technology so then it can find a good vein in your arm and also draw your blood. In the next step, it will also perform analysis on the blood from detecting biomarkers to obtaining genetic data.

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15) Now we wear a FitBit and other devices that measure easily quantifiable data, but the future belongs to digestible and wearable sensors that can work like a thin e-skin. These sensors will measure all important health parameters and vital signs from temperature, and blood biomarkers to neurological symptoms 24 hours a day transmitting data to the cloud and sending alerts to medical systems when a stroke is happening real time. It will call the ambulance itself and sends all the related data immediately.

e-skin

16) It is not just about checking and monitoring vital signs but intervention is also the key to a better health. Imagine tooth-embedded sensors that can recognize jaw movements, coughing, speaking and even smoking so it records when you eat too much or smoke no matter what the doctor told you. Again, it’s going to be extremely hard not to keep the doctor’s pieces of advice. Imagine the same wireless technology used in organs providing real-time data.

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17) If wearing thin e-skins or having embedded sensors is not a viable option for us, then let’s make an old dream come true. The concept of the tricorder from Star Trek has been there for decades and we still don’t have it. The Qualcomm Tricorder X Prize challenge will hopefully lead to the development of a device that can diagnose any diseases and give individuals more choices in their own health. The competition is hard as devices such as Scanadu are also being developed. What matters is patients will control their own health.

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18) I’ve always been a fan of IBM Watson and seen its potentials as huge opportunities in medicine. Watson will assist physicians in everyday medical decision-making, although it will not substitute humans at all.  While a physician can follow a few papers, maybe a few dozens of papers with digital solutions, Watson can process over 200 million pages in 3 seconds, therefore with the increasing amount of scientific data, it would be a wise decision using this in the practice of medicine.

IBMWatson

19) Since the completion of the Human Genome Project, we have been envisioning the era of personalized medicine in which everyone gets customized therapy with customized dosages. The truth is that there are only about 30 cases when personal genomics can be applied with evidence in the background according to the Personalized Medicine Coalition. As we move along this path, we will have more and more opportunities for using DNA analysis at the patient’s bedside which should be a must have before actually prescribing drugs.

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20) I thought I would put the simplest and most predictable medical advance to the bottom of this list. In the near future, whether it is the right and reliable medical information, dynamic resources or medical records; everything will simply be available to everyone which might not sound that interesting, but this would purely be the most important development in the history of medicine.

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It would be great if you could share your insights about other technological advances in the comment section after the post. I hope you enjoyed these two journeys into the future of medicine.

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10 Comments Post a comment
  1. And the future of medicine keeps on marching! I love science but part of me can’t help but find concern with how much of this technology will be used for good. ll we can do is hope that there’s more people out there working for the positive though because some of this stuff really could save lives.

    August 10, 2013
  2. Editor #

    Reblogged this on Inside the Brain.

    August 11, 2013
  3. Technology advancements never cease to amaze me!

    August 20, 2013
  4. johnbennett70 #

    Put it on the front page of http://www.InternetMedicine.com

    Things are differerent now; strange predictions, as they sometimes seem to be, become true.

    john bennett md
    InternetMedicine.com
    DocVid.com

    September 5, 2013
  5. jacob #

    I’d love to see artificial intelligence replace high-paid doctors and make them obsolete.

    October 8, 2013
  6. Daen de Leon #

    Re #19: Much more interesting (and tricky) than using genomic DNA is to look at cDNA from RNA transcripts (RNASeq). Several companies already use this technique in a targeted fashion — for example, Veracyte Inc uses cDNA from isolated RNA from thyroid nodules as an indicator of whether the nodule is benign or malignant (an array of ‘gene expression classifier cassettes’ signals confidence using about 150 up- or down-regulated gene expression tags, with the final cassette checking for the baseline benign gene expression set). This methodology, extended to blood draws and other organs amenable to fine-needle aspiration or other minimally invasive biopsy techniques, is likely to be more useful in the clinic for a much wider set of indications.

    July 30, 2014

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. 20 Potential Technological Advances in the Future of Medicine: Part I. | ScienceRoll
  2. From Doctor to Futurist: Step #6 The Responsibility | ScienceRoll
  3. Most Popular Medical Stories of 2013: Month by Month | ScienceRoll

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