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Posts from the ‘Cancer’ Category

Positive pregnancy test diagnoses man’s cancer on Reddit

I came across a very interesting story. A guy did a pregnancy test just for fun and posted the results on Reddit.com as the test was positive. The first commenter told him he should have himself checked for testicular cancer. He was right.

When that pregnancy test came back positive, CappnPoopDeck made a rage comic about it, and posted it to Reddit. The very first response, from a user named goxilo, was this: “If this is true, you should check yourself for testicular cancer. Seriously. Google it.”

Amazing Breast Cancer Self-Check iPad Ad

This is one of the best marketing ideas ever, certainly the best regarding breast cancer self-check. An iPad ad teaches people how to perform a proper self-check even without they would know they are learning it.

 

Great Social Media Cancer Campaign with a Celebrity

Miley Cyrus, the famous TV star, got a haircut and was criticized for that, but there came an amazing tweet about she donating her hair to cancer charity from the Twitter account of “Official Cancer“, a foundation fighting cancer. This image is among trending topics on Twitter, Facebook and Tumblr. This is how you draw attention to a serious cause with a nice twist.

Support for ‘Bald Barbie’ Campaign on Facebook

A Facebook campaign was launched a few weeks ago in order to urge Mattel to produce a bald version of its Barbie doll that will help children with cancer and others who have lost their hair due to illness cope with their conditions while playing. An excerpt from a recent article:

“We hope it gets the message out that being bald is beautiful and is no big deal.  There’s no need to cover up,” she said.

Sypin’s own daughter is one of those children.  The 12-year-old, named Kin Inich, lost her hair after chemotherapy.

Even though her daughter isn’t a huge Barbie fan, Sypin said she is excited about the idea.

“She said if they make one, she would totally get it,” Sypin said.  “The first thing she said was if they make that doll, she would buy a bunch and take them to a children’s hospital and give them to children with cancer.”

Here is the Facebook page on which you can support this great idea!

Top Medical Social Media Stories of 2011: Month by Month

2011 was a very intense and exciting year regarding the developments and new insights of the relationship between medicine/healthcare and social media. Here are my favourite stories from 2011 selected and featured month by month.

January

I had the honour to be included in the Advisory Board of the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media; I wrote about how a Samsung Galaxy Tab changed totally my online activities, how Google Translate can be used in medicine and featured HealCam, a medical alternative of ChatRoulette.

February

Facebook diagnosis by surgeon saved a friend; there was a lively discussion whether pharma companies can edit Wikipedia entries about their own products, it turned out Wikipedia can be a key tool for global public health promotion; and Scienceroll won the Best Medical Technology/Informatics Blog category for the third time in a row in the Medgadget’s Weblog Awards.

March

The new semester of the Internet in Medicine social media university course was launched, pregnant women could text their due date for free weekly advice during pregnancy on Push, Baby Push;  Webicina was featured by the Kairos Society on Wall Street,  UCSF Medical Center installed a robotic pharmacy in order to remove medication errors from the system; and here is my video message for Stanford about the importance of digital literacy in medical education.

April

Jay Parkinson summarized his story of being the first online doc, the Webicina iPhone app won the 2011 Medical App Awards; Al Jazeera called me Dr. Twitter after I described how Twitter can be used for medical crowdsourcing, and in the fight against AIDS a time lapse video of a woman with HIV/AIDS was published.

May

Blogger announced own death after battle with cancer which shocked people, then a woman managed to find a kidney donor through Twitter, The Social Life of Health Information Pew Internet report was released, and top doctors described how a medical professional should start using social media.

June

I co-authored a medical textbook about medical communication in social media; Google Health was announced to be closed, a cancer patient who blogged about his hospital treatment was threatened with legal action by an NHS trust; Doctors 2.0 and You was the event of the year; and here are some disasters in social media and what we should learn from them.

July

ePatient Dave rocked TED; Mayo Clinic launched an online community in a perfect way, Pfizer’s Facebook page got hacked and they reacted badly, I listed the reasons why I like Google+ even in medicine; mobile apps got regulated by the FDA; and it turned out iPhones can be used for obtaining ECG.

August

I published a story about how Twitter can be used to predict epidemics; even waiting rooms can be redesigned to improve healthcare; I described why I’m happy that patients use the web; started managing the social media presence of a huge medical portal; I stated what you write only is forever; and pharma had hard days because of comments on Facebook.

September

Using hashtags is crucial in medical communication on Twitter;  I talked about the future of health 2.0 in Europe; organized a virtual medical consultation in the virtual world on World Heart Day; this is how creativity can be used in healthcare; and I presented the best apps of a physician at the Doctors 2.0 and You conference.

October

Nobel winner died days before award announced; I shared a social media love story about a bone marrow donor; an app let us run figures on maps; Google+ was used for case presentations; and Mayo Clinic launched the Know Your Numbers campaign.

November

I published the 7 Features of the New Generation of Physicians; my open access success story; a summary about the Games for Health conference; hardcore campaigns about men’s health; and revealed why the most viewed medical video on Youtube got millions of hits.

December

Winners of the Webicina social media story contest were announced; WHO featured Webicina; the launch of a global medial social media course was announced; I described my time management tools and tips in medicine; the open access set of social media guidelines for and about pharma was published; and finally found the cutest story of 2011, parents got insulin-pump tattoos to support diabetic child.

I’m going to post my predictions for 2012 tomorrow and I hope you will stay with Scienceroll.com next year as well!

A Comic Shows How a Cancer Patient Can Choose Treaments

There is a very realistic comic on XKCD about how a cancer patient can find and choose a treatment.

Oncology in Social Media: The most relevant resources!

As the number of medical websites is exponentially growing, it’s getting harder to find quality and relevant resources in oncology, a very sensitive and fast-growing field of medicine. The newest selection on Webicina.com, Oncology and Web 2.0, was designed to help you find relevant and quality resources even in social media. Blogs, podcasts, news sites, communities, mobile apps and many more.

PeRSSonalized Oncology, the simplest, free, customizable, multi-lingual medical information aggregator will also let you follow these resources easily in a personalized way.

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Feel free to share any of these resources and let us know if you think others should be added.

If you are wondering how Webicina and PeRSSonalized Medicine work, here are some tutorials:

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