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Posts from the ‘Education’ Category

How Do Medical Students See Future Technologies: Infographics

I just wrote about how our Disruptive Technologies in Medicine university course prepares medical students for the coming waves of change. I also recently published an infographic related to new technologies in medicine.

Yesterday, I gave a talk to medical students about what kind of trends and technologies might shape the future and I was very curious what they think about these. Therefore I asked them to give a score between 1 and 3 about how beneficial or advantageous those can be for society; and a score between 1 and 3 about how big threats they will pose to us.

They also gave a score between 1 and 10 about how much they look forward to using a technology in action. See the full size infographics here.

Preparing them for the future is a real challenge but I remain confident that we need to to that and it is still possible.

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Disruptive Technologies in Medicine: Preparing Medical Students For The Future!

At Semmelweis Medical School in Budapest, we launched a new course, “Disruptive Technologies in Medicine” with Professor Maria Judit Molnar MD, PhD, DSc, the scientific Vice Rector of Semmelweis University in 2014. I’m very happy to share that we launched it again this semester.

Our plan is to prepare medical students for those future technologies they will face by the time they start actually practicing medicine. We need to give future physicians skills that help deal with the coming waves of technological changes in a way that they will learn how to improve the human touch with better technologies.

Here are the topics we cover with experts.

  • How Exponential and Disruptive Technologies Shape The Future of Medicine
  • Personalized Medicine – Genomic Health
  • Point of Care Diagnostics
  • The Future of Medical Imaging
  • Social Media in Medicine
  • Harnessing Big Data in Healthcare, Cognitive Computers
  • The Future of Hospitals
  • Biotechnology and Gene Therapy
  • Mobile Health, The Wearable Revolution and Telemedicine
  • Regenerative Medicine, Optogenetics and 3D Printing
  • Medical Robotics, Bionics, Virtual Reality, and Future of Medical Technologies

We are teaching them offline and online at the same time with plenty of assignments and interesting projects such as collaboration with the students of the course of Kim Solez at University of Alberta.

Students compete against each other in a Facebook challenge by answering questions about the topics we cover in the lectures every single day.

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5 Ways to Prepare The Doctors of The Future

Years ago when I was a medical student I felt that lexical knowledge was more important than actually being able to find the information I need. And now there are 23 million peer-reviewed papers on Pubmed.com so the skill of being able to find information is becoming even more important than ever.

I thought that medical curriculum should be redesigned in a way that now we can serve this new need for skills such as digital literacy. That is why I launched the world’s first university course focusing on social media, mobile health and the future of medicine. The course is still running with full house.

In my new video, I described methods that help us prepare students for becoming physicians who can take care of their patients in a technological world. Here is the video and then summaries of the 5 methods.

Developing e-learning platforms

I launched an e-learning platform for my students on which they can check all the presentations with hand-outs, data, studies, plus they can do the tests online. If they complete the tests online, they can skip the written exam.

The Social MEDia Course

The Social MEDia Course

Engaging students through social media

As all my medical students have Facebook accounts; challenges, tasks about online activities and questions about the topics covered during the lectures are posted every day during the semester on the Facebook page of the course and students with the most bonus points do not have to take the written exam. They fight against each other.

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Gamification

The typical curriculum requires students to study texts and data by heart without proper reasoning and understanding the logic behind it. Instead, study through serious diagnostic games has clear advantages. The “Healing Blade” card game takes the player into a world of sorcery and creatures where real–world knowledge of infectious diseases and therapeutics play a pivotal role in the winning strategy. “Occam’s Razor” is a real diagnostic card game released by NerdCore Medical.

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Creating a digital environment

I offer students the chance to interact with each other outside the curriculum online. If they need help in using a social media channel, they can find me online and I’m happy to help. With some of them, I’m still in touch even years after they completed my course. This way they can learn the tricks of online collaboration and it might be a simpler task when they have to do it as a part of their everyday job.

Rethinking the whole curriculum

At Radboud University Medical Center, they are currently working on a revolutionary new medical curriculum. The educational vision behind this transformation has been inspired by people all over the world who want to improve people’s lives through healthcare and education. In this system, each student has a personal coach. They work with a so–called open space technology in which students themselves decide what will be addressed when students and teachers meet. Currently, biomedical and medical students also work as consultants for pharmaceutical companies in an attempt to come up with innovative ideas. These young students still have a lot to learn, but it seems they learn very quickly when under pressure.

Please share what you think either as a student or a lecturer and read more about the future of medical education in my recent book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine!

The Guide to the Future of Medicine ebook cover

Channelling the future in medical education: Infographic!

I launched two courses at Semmelweis Medical School in order to prepare students for the digital world. One is focusing on the medical use of social media, and the other is dedicated to disruptive technologies and how to find the human touch in the digital jungle. Therefore I was very excited when Ashfield, an international healthcare services organization, asked me to be the moderator of a global discussion on the future of education.

I had a chance to work with key opinion leaders of medical education and to engage in amazing discussions about the future needs of medical professionals.

Medical education must ­finally step up to meet the expectations of empowered patients, the needs of busy physicians, and the use of disruptive technologies. This forum was designed to facilitate this process.

See the detailed article about the results on Pharmaphorum, the announcement by Ashfield and the whole infographic. Here is my favorite part and an excerpt from the article of Ruth Herman:

The digital revolution has already led to major changes in channel preferences as mobile technologies, online networks and other innovations provide better ways for healthcare professionals to learn and obtain new information. These changes are likely to continue as the digital skills and sophistication of both patient and physician populations continue to grow. So how can the providers of this information stay ahead?

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Here Is The World’s First Masters Degree in 3D Bioprinting

It is not surprising that universities are ready to take steps into obvious directions of technological advances such as 3D printing. Two Australian, a Dutch and a German university just created the world’s first masters degree program that will allow students to claim that they are masters of biofabrication.

Such bold moves truly show how education must change in order to meet today’s needs.

The two year program gives students one Master’s degree in Regenerative Medicine & Technology from one of the above Australian universities and one of the above European universities. QUT’s biofabrication research has become famous for 3D printing bioink scaffolds infused with a patient’s stem cells to help a woman grow a new breast after a mastectomy.

masters-degree-in-3D-bioprinting-Associate-Professor-Mia-Woodruff.

Simulations from the Future of Cardiology

Cardiology is a key area that could use some refreshments regarding the tools and devices used to teach its anatomy and physiology in the medical curriculum.

Based on a patient’s CT scan and using a mix of stereo lithography and other prototyping techniques, xCardio creates a copy of a human heart that is anatomically correct both inside and out.

While the main purpose of a new game, Relive, is to increase the awareness about CPR and push people, especially teenagers and young adults, to take a CPR class and be prepared to intervene in case of need.

 

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See 6 Reasons Why I Wish I Was a Medical Student Now and how Synthetic Human Cadavers could be used in medical education.

 

See In Action How Medical Education Is Re-Designed!

I’ve been teaching medical students about the meaningful use of health IT, social media and other disruptive technologies for 5 years. I created a digital format of the course therefore any medical student or medical professional in the world can access the materials and finish the course.

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There are 3 additional projects going on right now:

  1. My students fight for bonus points on the Facebook page of the course. I post challenges every single day during the semester and I will also measure the effectiveness of this approach with the surveys students will fill in soon, but I can tell you now it’s going just great with over a hundred students participating and competing with their knowledge. This out-of-the-curriculum experience helps them a lot in learning to use the Internet more efficiently. I knew I had to find them with such an approach where they are online and based on the first week survey, 100% of them are on Facebook.
  2. As e-patients lead the movement of including social media in the practice of medicine, we need to listen to them. I already said that every medical student in the world must read the bookLet Patients Help” from E-patient Dave and I’m taking the first step when I include this book in this semester’s recommended reading list, plus also including questions about the book in the final written exam. I’m working on persuading Semmelweis University (where I teach my course) to endorse it first and make it a must-read book for every medical student.
  3. We need to demonstrate disruptive technologies to students, not just talking about them. When I asked Dr. David Albert that I would love to show AliveCor to the students live, he kindly made it happen and I have my own AliveCor now. This April, I will show students how to do an ECG with an iPhone. This is the first step and I’m looking for other innovators and vendors to let me present their technologies to students. The only way to have tech-savvy physicians in the healthcare system is to train them like that.

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Further reading:

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