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Posts from the ‘Google’ Category

Would You Volunteer for Google’s Moonshot Medical Study?

The new moonshot project from Google is to create a Google Maps of the human body including molecular and genomic information as well. The Personal Genome Project (PGP) had a similar mission years ago, but this one seems to be even bigger.

The 175 healthy people will go through an exam that includes the collection of body fluids like blood and saliva, after which Google X researchers will review what they have learnt and engage researchers at Duke University and Stanford University for a much larger study.

The eventual aim is for Baseline to act as a reference for the chemistry of a well-run, healthy body, and in turn, identify anomalies far earlier. The hope is that the medicine industry moves more towards prevention rather than treatment in response to illnesses.

A major difference is the institution or company standing behind both projects. The PGP was initiated by Harvard University’s Professor George M. Church, while this new project is launched by Google. I have to note though that Google plans to make the results available for “qualified researchers in health”; data collected will be anonymous and not be shared with insurance companies.

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But Dan Munro at Re/code immediately shared his concerns about participating in such a study due to legal risks and the level of trust related to Google.

I’m sure Google wants my genetic data — preferably for free of, course — and will say anything in order to get it. Does that mean that it has earned my trust to use that data as part of an ambiguous, long-term experiment? Not with my genetic data. At least not yet. Thanks for the offer, but no thanks.

Google And Novartis Tracking Diabetes With Smart Contact Lenses

A few months ago I discussed the future features of smart contact lenses. Now using these to augment vision or track health parameters is not only a good idea any more, as Google launched a partnership with the pharmaceutical company Novartis to develop smart contact lenses that can track diabetes by measuring blood glucose levels in tears and fix farsightedness as well.

As part of the agreement, Google[x] and Novartis’ eye care division Alcon will create smart lenses that feature “non-invasive sensors, microchips and other miniaturized electronics” and focus on two main areas. The first will provide a way for diabetic patients to keep on top of their glucose levels by measuring the sugar levels in their tear fluid, feeding the data back to a smartphone or tablet. The second solution aims to help restore the eye’s natural focus on near objects, restoring clear vision to those who are only farsighted (presbyopia).

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Google set to launch Google Fit!

After weeks of rumors about Apple launching a health initiative then getting much less than expected, now Google is said to launch a new health tracking platform called Google Fit.

Not to be left behind by Apple, Google could soon launch its own health-tracking platform for mobile devices. Forbes reports that the search giant is working on a new service, tentatively called Google Fit, which will pull in data from third-party fitness wearables and health apps and combine them into one central app. It’s not known if Fit will be delivered as a standalone app or come embedded inside future versions of Android, but it would likely operate as Google-made version of Apple’s HealthKit, a service that lets companies like Nike feed in fitness data, and Samsung’s own fitness framework, SAMI.

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Digital Contact Lens Will Let Us Turn The Page By Blinking

Google is working on a new digital, multi-sensor contact lens according to the US Patent & Trademark Office. It will work with Google Glass and other wearables, as well as Android smartphones, Google Now, smart televisions and other devices.

It will let its user turn the page of a book or proceed to the next song by blinking.

The ultimate goal is to insert a screen into the lens but this will take years to fulfill.

According to Google, a mechanism is provided for detecting blinking of an eye via multiple sensors on or within the contact lens (hereinafter referred to as multi-sensor contact lens). For example, a multi-sensor contact lens can be placed in one or both eyes of a user that can actively determine (or infer) blinking of the eye.

In a non-limiting example, multi-sensor contact lens monitors sensors on or within the multi-sensor contact lens at intervals that are less than an average or shortest length of time of an eye blink. It is to be appreciated that both eyes of a human user generally blink at the same time, and thus in various embodiments only one multi-sensor contact lens is needed to generate a command to a remote device.

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9 Steps About How to Disappear From The Internet

There is a very interesting and instructive step-by-step guide about how to delete yourself from the internet and disappear completely online. I’m not encouraging you to delete your profiles online, but there are a few details in the guide which might come handy in some cases such as how to ask Google to remove a search engine result posting information about you.

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My CNN Article: 10 ways technology will save your life in the future

I was invited to write an article about 10 ways technology will save our lives in the future for CNN.com and I was happy to do so. It was featured today on the main page of CNN. I hope you will find it useful. Here is the introduction:

The medical and healthcare sectors are in the midst of rapid change, and it can be difficult to see which new technologies will have a long-lasting impact.

Ideally, the future of healthcare will balance innovative medical technologies with the human touch. Here, I’ve outlined the trends most likely to change our lives, now or in the near future.

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Breastfeeding Mothers Getting Help From Google Glass?

I always try to find new ways of using Google Glass in healthcare, but to be honest, I have never thought of this option.

New mothers struggling with breastfeeding may soon have the latest technology at their disposal to get expert help at any time of day.

The Melbourne office of an innovation company called Small World is about to conduct a Google Glass trial with the Australian Breastfeeding Association that will effectively allow their telephone counsellors to see through the eyes of mothers while they breastfeed at home.

The company is looking for 10 Victorian women expecting to give birth in February who want to trial the high-tech glasses for six to eight weeks to receive breastfeeding coaching.

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