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Posts from the ‘Health 2.0’ Category

Social Media in Clinical Practice: The Handbook

Springer published my book, Social Media in Clinical Practice, almost a year ago and since then, I have received an amazing number of photos about people holding the book, social media posts and e-mails from readers who found my handbook to be very helpful in their professional lives. While the content is fortunately still up-to-date, it seems the turn-around time for a new book is about one year as lately, the number of messages has dramatically increased.

Medical professionals worldwide shared their insights, experience and suggestions about using social media resources in medicine using my book’s examples. Therefore, I’d like to ask anyone who likes to discuss such topics to use the #hcsm hashtag on Twitter or contact me directly, I’m always happy to initiate new discussions.

Here you can check out the detailed descriptions of all the chapters.

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My Wearable Health Trackers: Pebble Smartwatch

In this edition of my series about wearable health trackers that I use, I have already described TinkéAliveCor and Withings. Now let me share my experience with the Pebble smartwatch. This smartwatch got famous by being successfully crowdfunded on Kickstarter. Mine was shipped this April and since then, I still haven’t been able to discover all its functionalities and the possibilities it provides. The reason behind that is the app store of Pebble full of great applications. Due to its own system, developers can create applications specifically designed for the Pebble.

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This way, I have these apps right now:

  • I can control music on my smartphone from the Pebble.
  • I get notifications about e-mails, phone calls or text messages (I don’t have to keep my phone in front of me during meetings any more).
  • Alarms.
  • Timers.
  • Pedometer measuring the number of steps I take.
  • Morpheuz is waking me up at the best time.
  • 7-min workout guides me to a healthy morning exercise.
  • Compass (never know when it comes handy).

Its success truly depends on how rich the community of apps can become soon.

Among negative examples, I could mention that its screen is black and white; only a few apps can be added to the watch, although the battery life is amazingly long.

Google set to launch Google Fit!

After weeks of rumors about Apple launching a health initiative then getting much less than expected, now Google is said to launch a new health tracking platform called Google Fit.

Not to be left behind by Apple, Google could soon launch its own health-tracking platform for mobile devices. Forbes reports that the search giant is working on a new service, tentatively called Google Fit, which will pull in data from third-party fitness wearables and health apps and combine them into one central app. It’s not known if Fit will be delivered as a standalone app or come embedded inside future versions of Android, but it would likely operate as Google-made version of Apple’s HealthKit, a service that lets companies like Nike feed in fitness data, and Samsung’s own fitness framework, SAMI.

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Medical Specialties That Can Benefit from Google Glass

I’ve been writing about the potentials Google Glass might have in healthcare (see the list below the image) and now here is a great article describing some examples and medical specialties that could benefit from using it the most.

  1. Wound care
  2. Surgery
  3. Anesthesiology
  4. Intensive Care
  5. Emergency Response

I would definitely add medical education to the list. Now students don’t have to look over the shoulder of the surgeon but actually can watch what the surgeon is really seeing right now on huge HD screens.

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Here are some other articles dedicated to this issue:

 

Apple Introduces HealthKit, People Expected More

Over the last months, there have been a lot of speculations about the next step Apple might take in healthcare, but to be honest, expectations were too high. The HealthKit Apple announced this week is an app measuring a few physical activities and the inclusion of other health trackers such as Nike Fuelband, Withings or Fitbit into the system.

Analysts expected to see a smartwatch measuring plenty of health parameters in an innovative way. Maybe next time.

Health will be able to source some user activity data in newer iOS devices, thanks to Apple’s M7 motion-tracking chip. But it will also tie into other quantified self-tracking apps and devices, and combine their data into one slick new user interface. Apple exec Craig Federighi mentioned Nike and the Mayo Clinic as partners, but more third-party developers will likely participate.

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Apple’s ‘Healthbook’ Coming Today?

The rumors have been around for some time now and today, Apple might announce a new product called Healthbook that focuses on tracking health. We will see! Stay tuned!

Apple will put on its big show at its world wide developers conferenceon Monday, and you can expect it to take the opportunity to introduce its long-rumored health and fitness app and platform, “Healthbook.”

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Medical Students At UC Irvine Get Google Glass

The UC Irvine medical school in California made a good decision and started experimenting with using augmented reality in the classrooms by giving medical students Google Glasses which might help them with anatomy, clinical skills, and hospital rotations.

As someone living with such digital technologies, I have to say if it is used in the right way, it will truly improve their chance for better studying the art of medicine, as well as their scores. Why not incorporating these in the traditional curriculum if they can add clear value to education?

Irvine will be the first medical school to fully incorporate Glass into its four-year curriculum. Its first- and second-year students will use the device in their anatomy and clinical skills courses, while third- and fourth-year students will wear Glass during their hospital rotations.

“I believe digital technology will let us bring a more impactful and relevant clinical learning experience to our students,” UC Irvine’s dean of medicine Dr. Ralph V. Clayman said in a statement. “Enabling our students to become adept at a variety of digital technologies fits perfectly into the ongoing evolution of healthcare into a more personalized, participatory, home-based and digitally driven endeavor.”

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