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Posts from the ‘Health’ Category

The 12 Most Exciting and Surprising Collaborations in Digital Health

From time to time, I come across news covering collaborations between companies which are either promising or surprising. Sometimes both. A future full of science fiction technologies in medicine & healthcare starts with such collaborations. Here are those I’m the most excited about.

1) Oscar Health, the hipster insurance company, works with the wearable tracker Fitbit. Insured people can submit their Fitbit data and if they reach the daily fitness goals, they get $1 every day.

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2) Qualcomm, which is world leader in 3G, 4G and next-generation wireless technologies, and Walgreens, the largest drug retailing chain in the US, are collaborating  to power device connectivity in remote patient monitoring, transitional care support and chronic care management.

3) The patient community site Patientslikeme.com started working with the pharma company AstraZeneca to support patient-driven research initiatives. AstraZeneca will use data from the community site to improve outcomes of several therapeutic areas.

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4) The company Organovo that works on printing out biomaterials teamed up with L’Oréal to focus on printing out synthetic skin.

5) Organovo also works with the pharma company Merck to use the 3D printed liver system for drug testing. It could eradicate the use of animal testing at pharma companies.

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6) The American Association of Retired Persons launched a collaboration with Pfizer and United Health to discover how wearable devices and other health trackers could impact the lives of people aged 50 and older.

7) The pharma company Boehringer Ingelheim has formed a new digital health collaboration with California healthcare provider Sutter Health. They will test digital health solutions, mobile technologies and data analytics.

8) Novartis signed an agreement with Google about the digital contact lens that Google patented in 2014 and can measure blood glucose levels from tears. It could be a hit in diabetes management.

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9) The Human Longevity Inc. is joining forces with Cleveland Clinic for a human genomics collaboration aimed at disease discovery. They will sequence and analyze blood samples from the medical center’s patient study, running whole genome, cancer and microbiome sequencing.

10) Nestlé started working with companies that develop food printers. They want to have a branch with business models, experts and products by the time food printing becomes a common thing at home.

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11) Google’s Calico project works together with the pharma company Abbvie to accelerate the discovery, development and commercialization of new therapies.

12) Pfizer surprised many of us when it announced its collaboration with a lab developing DNA robots. They could target diseases more efficiently with robots that deliver the drug to the desired location.

Have I missed anything? Please let me know.

The Most Popular Articles About The Future Of Medicine & Healthcare

I’ve received plenty of messages about where the most popular articles I’ve written about the future of medicine can be accessed. I thought I would share the list in one post, I hope you will enjoy it!

Will The Hospital Of The Future Be Our Home?

The biggest part of healthcare is self care which takes places outside the medical system. I need to manage my health and disease not only in the hospital and during the doctor visits, but also at home. Still when people talk about the future of hospitals, they usually depict amazing technologies and really huge devices.

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What Comes After The #Wearable Health Revolution?

The wearable health trackers’ revolution has been going on producing devices that let us measure vital signs and health parameters at home. It is changing the whole status quo of healthcare as medical information and now tracking health are available outside the ivory tower of medicine.

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12 Things We Can 3D Print in Medicine Right Now

3D printing is just one of the many revolutionary technologies currently being used in healthcare.

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Commentary: we need to be better prepared for a technological future (BMJ)

IBM Watson is the Stethoscope of the 21st Century

Computer assistance can only facilitate the work of physicians, not replace it. Just like how stethoscope did.

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10 Things How Artificial Intelligence Could Make Me a Better Doctor

I was watching the movie Her for the second time and I was fascinated again about the scene in which the main character played by Joaquin Phoenix got his new operating system with artificial intelligence (AI) and started working with that. I couldn’t stop thinking about the ways I could use such an AI system in my life and how it actually could make me a better doctor.

JOAQUIN PHOENIX as Theodore in the romantic drama "HER," directed by Spike Jonze, a Warner Bros. Pictures release.

What Should Hospitals Look Like In The Future?

How do you start when the goal is to design the hospital of the future? When I was writing this chapter for my new book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, I contacted talented architects, as well as organizations such as NXT Health focusing on this sensitive topic and shared my own views as well.

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The Future of Diabetes Management: 8 Reasons Why We Face Extraordinary Times!

Around 400 million patients have diabetes worldwide according to estimations. And over the last few years, diabetes management has been improving but due to the new technologies and devices coming to the market very soon, the whole management of diabetes will significantly change in the coming years. Let me show you some examples how.

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Ethical Issues of The Future of Medicine: The Top 10

I remain confident that we are still in time and we can still prepare for the amazing yet uncertain future of medicine. What is definitely needed, among others things such as new skills, is initiating public discussions now. It was my intention when I made a list of 10 potential ethical issues we will all have to deal with soon.

[In the first test of a new program designed to bring innovative medical devices to market faster, the Food and Drug Administration will evaluate brain-controlled prosthetic arms developed by the Defense Department. Photo credit: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.] *** []

Three Digital Services in Diabetes

When I wrote about why diabetes management is facing extraordinary times, I included digital services. I recently came across some new services I haven’t heard about and thought I would share them with you. Hopefully, patients managing diabetes will find them useful.

1) VoyageMD: It helps diabetes patients who need to travel. Created by Professor David Kerr, it provides the latest information on all aspects of travel and diabetes including reviews on places to stay; travel itineraries and checklists; travel product reviews and airport procedures.

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2) ExCarbs: It was designed to help people with diabetes using insulin to feel comfortable with taking up exercise.

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3) diasend: It is a standalone system for easy uploading of information from most glucose meters, insulin pumps, CGMs and mobile apps. It also users to choose to link to various activity tracker systems including Fitbit, Up by Jawbone, Nike+ FuelBand, Moves and Runkeeper.

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Please let me know if you come across others.

The World’s Most Famous Real-Life Cyborgs

In the future of human mankind, we could have brain implants improving memory and other cognitive skills. We could have implanted magnets or RFID chips in our fingers to replace passwords and keys. We could have exoskeletons boosting our strength, we could be faster, jump higher augmenting a whole range of human capabilities. But augmentation will pose threats and ethical issues to society we have never faced before. It’s important to remain humans though, but use technology to improve our lives.

Let’s see what kind of real-life cyborgs we know of today who might show a good example of where we should find a balance between using technologies with our body but remaining a human being.

1) Neil Harbisson: He has a specialized electronic eye, rendering perceived colors as sounds on the musical scale. So it means it lets him “hear” color. He said „It’s not necessary to hack into the body to become a cyborg. We are all cyborgs already.” He is an artist born with achromatopsia, or extreme colorblindness that meant he could only see in black-and-white, he is now capable of experiencing colors beyond the scope of normal human perception.

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2) Dr. Kevin Warwick: He is a cybernetics professor in the UK’s University of Reading. He has experimented with different electronic implants since 1998 such as installing a microchip in his arm which lets him operate lights, heaters, computers and lights remotely. He and his work have become one. He is the founder of Project Cyborg using himself as the guinea pig, he’s on a mission to become the world’s most complete cyborg.

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3) Jesse Sullivan: He became a cyborg when he got equipped with a bionic limb, which was connected through nerve-muscle grafting. Aside from having control over his limb with his mind, he can also feel temperature as well as how much pressure his grip applies.

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4) Nigel Ackland. After losing a part of his arm during a work accident, he got upgraded. His new arm has a hand that can independently move to grip even delicate objects. He controls the arm through muscle movements in his remaining forearm. The range of movement is truly extraordinary. He can independently move each of his five fingers to grip delicate objects, or even pour a liquid into a glass.

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5) Jerry Jalava: He lost a finger in a motorcycle accident, and decided to have a 2GB USB port embedded into his prosthetic. It doesn’t upload any information directly into his brain though. He is the perfect example of how you don’t need to be a robotics mastermind to become a cyborg; you can pretty much do it yourself.

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6) Cameron Clapp: He was 14 when he collapsed and fainted along a railroad track. When the train passed, he unfortunately lost both of his legs plus an arm. He got fitted with a couple of prosthetic legs controlled by his brain with the help of a microprocessor. Since then, he has become an athlete and an amputee activist.

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7) Professor Steve Mann: He designed a headset that is outfitted with a number of small computers and through it, he can record and play video and audio. He was one of the, if not the first, cyborgs in the world.

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8) Claudia Mitchell: She became the first woman to become a cyborg when she was outfitted with a bionic limb. Her robotic arm is similar to the one installed on fellow cyborg Jesse Sullivan.

WASHINGTON - SEPTEMBER 14:  Claudia Mitchell demonstrates the functionality of her "bionic arm" during a news conference on September 14, 2006 in Washington, DC. Mitchell is the first female recipient of a "thought controlled bionic arm", an advanced prosthesis, developed by the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

9) Stelios Arcadiou, also known as Stelarc: He is a performance artist who believes that the human body is obsolete. To prove this, he’s had an artificially-created ear surgically attached to his left arm. In another show, he hooked up electrodes to his body to allow people to control his muscles through the Web.

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They are the world’s most famous real-life cyborgs. Did I miss anyone? You can read more about cyborgs and the future of life in The Guide to The Future of Medicine.

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The Medical Futurist on Instagram

As 90% of the hundreds of millions of Instagram users are younger than 35, I made a decision. I think the message that technologies can improve the human touch should reach millennials as well.

So, check out the Medical Futurist on Instagram. Photos and images about future technologies and the amazing innovations I come across worldwide.

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How I Manage Stress With A Device

In my recent video, I describe how I manage stress with a device that teaches me how to relax. It helps a lot and only takes a few minutes. Do you use other technologies to decrease stress?

Will The Hospital Of The Future Be Our Home?

The biggest part of healthcare is self care which takes places outside the medical system. I need to manage my health and disease not only in the hospital and during the doctor visits, but also at home. Still when people talk about the future of hospitals, they usually depict amazing technologies and really huge devices.

What if the majority of care could be provided in our homes? What if wearable and other devices could measure what needs to be measured in the bathroom or bedroom? What if smart clothes and brain activity trackers could change the way we work from home?

Let’s see what technologies might transform our home to be the new clinic, the hospital of the future.

The bathroom

It could include a smart scale that measures weight, body fat percentage; recognizes you and sends data immediately to your smartphone. The mirror could be a digital one analyzing your stress levels, pulse and mood just by looking at you. It could present news related to these parameters. You could use a smart toothbrush that could analyze whether you are hydrated or not; and give rewards for spending enough time with that activity. Then in the toilet, there could be a little microchip for urine analysis. When you go into the shower, the smart home could bring the temperature down by using the smart device like Nest acquired by Google. Water quality and quantity, cardiac fitness and a bunch of other things simple devices could measure in the bathroom.

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The bedroom

It could include smart sleep monitors which first give you data about what quality of sleep you had and then it could wake you up at the best time to make sure you are energized in the morning. When you go to bed, the smart sleep monitor could let the Nest know it should bring the temperature down because you are about to sleep. Such monitors could include specific music and lights to make sure you are gently woken up. Pulse, pulse variability, breathing and oxygen saturation could be measured to reduce sleep apnoe and snoring.

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The kitchen

There could be smart forks and spoons that either teach us how to eat slowly; or let people with Parkinson’s disease eat properly again. Scanners could measure the ingredients, allergens and toxins in our food and let smartphone applications help control our diet. There could be 3D food printers using fresh ingredients and create pizza, cookies, or almost any kind of final products just like what Foodini does these days.

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The work desk

You could wear smart clothes measuring vital signs, posture, stress levels and brain activity telling us when exactly to work for better performance. Services such as Exist.io could constantly look for performance tips by finding correlations between our digital habits and health parameters.

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We can use almost all these devices now and looking ahead into the future the best is just yet to come. The quest is to find those technologies that can really change the way we live our lives by bringing the clinical and hospital equipment to our actual homes providing better care without making the distance between patient and caregiver bigger.

What would you like to measure at home? What do you think about the home becoming the clinic with medical equipment and devices measuring our vital signs and making our lives simpler and better?

Please feel free to read more about the future of hospitals in my new book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine. Thank you!

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