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Posts from the ‘Hospital’ Category

A Fully Digital Hospital Opens in 2015

I just heard the news that the first fully digital (entirely paperless) hospital will open in Abu Dhabi in 2015. The clinic worked with experts from the famous Cleveland Clinic, the No. 4 ranked best hospital in the United States. This might be a good step towards changing the hospital experience not only for professionals working there but more importantly for patients to make it a place where they go to re-energize themselves.

“The fact that a unified medical record is going to exist will provide seamless communication, which means there is an opportunity for us to communicate back and forth with the main campus and elsewhere in the healthcare system, without having the patient have the responsibility of carrying paper,” Harrison was quoted in the article as saying.

The 13-storey LEED Gold-Certified facility in Al Maryah Island will have five Centers of Excellence: Heart & Vascular Institute, Digestive Disease Institute, Eye Institute, Neurological Institute, and Respiratory & Critical Care Institute, according to anEmirates 24/7 article. It will have 364 beds, five clinical floors, three treatment and diagnostic levels, 26 operating rooms, and 13 floors of acute and critical care units.

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From “Patient to Person” and “From Hospital to Home”

Healthcare should be centered around the patient and the hospital experience should be entirely redesigned. Medical professionals should act as partners with their patients and as patients will measure any health parameters about themselves at home, the process of delivering healthcare will be totally different. Do you think it’s futuristic?

See what the Danish government came up with:

For those not tracking with the ambitious Danish experiment to leverage technology – specifically telemedicine – to restructure their community based and selectively ‘inefficient’ hospital centric delivery system see: ‘Restructuring & modernizing the hospital sector’,  ‘Potential gains from hospital mergers in Denmark‘ or ‘Widespread Adoption of InformationTechnology in Primary Care Physician Offices in Denmark: A Case Study.’

The Guide to the Future of Medicine: Download the White Paper with Infographic

Being a medical futurist means I work on bringing disruptive technologies to medicine & healthcare; assisting medical professionals and students in using these in an efficient and secure way; and educating e-patients about how to become equal partners with their caregivers.

Based on what we see in other industries, this is going to be an exploding series of changes and while redesigning healthcare takes a lot of time and efforts, the best we can do is to prepare all stakeholders for what is coming next. That was the reason behind creating The Guide to the Future of Medicine white paper which you can download for free.

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Please use the Twitter hashtag #MedicalFuture for giving feedback.

In the white paper, there is an infographic featuring the main trends that shape the future of medicine visualized from 3 perspectives:

  1. Which stage of the delivery of healthcare and the practice of medicine is affected by that (Prevent & Prepare; Data Input & Diagnostics; Therapy & Follow-up; and Outcomes & Consequences);
  2. Whether it affects patients or healthcare professionals;
  3. The practicability of it (already available – green boxes; in progress – orange boxes; and still needs time – red boxes)

Click here to see the infographic in the original size.

Guide to the Future of Medicine Infographic

I hope you will find the guide useful in your work or in preparing your company and colleagues for the future of medicine.

Stanford Hospital Uses Telemedicine: Steps to the Future of Hospitals

Video consultation with doctors is becoming a routine part of the care offered by the Stanford Hospital & Clinics. The technology behind it is not a real innovation, it was already introduced on the island of Hawaii in 2008, but it’s good to see such a prestigious hospital joining the world of telemedicine.

Patients can schedule video visits through the hospital website, in much the same way as they would schedule a traditional visit and provide information about their symptoms in advance of the visit through the scheduling application. At the appointed time, they meet with the doctor in a Web-based videoconference from a home or workplace computer equipped with a webcam.

Now that we know what elements and points are needed to design a much better healthcare system, what’s next?

A landmark report by the Royal College of Physicians in response to the NHS crisis has outlined 50 measures to modernise the service to cope with the demands of an ageing population, but critics question if there is the political will or money to make it a reality.

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Why Would Agent Smith From Matrix Advertise GE’s Hospital Software?

Please someone help me understand why the evil Agent Smith from Matrix is used in the advertisement of General Electric’s new hospital software with such dramatic background music? I might be too conservative now, but advertising a hospital software this way in an era when doctors are threatened to lose their job because of super computers (they won’t), is certainly not a good idea and I don’t think it’s funny.

From Doctor to Futurist: Step #6 The Responsibility

After fulfilling my childhood dream of becoming a doctor and a geneticist, I decided to make a brave change in my academic career and started discovering the steps needed to become a medical futurist. There is no clear path or course for that, therefore I try to reveal more and more pieces of information about this exciting journey in this series of blog entries.

In the journey so far, I’ve described what it means to become a medical futurist, I’ve been sharing reports about the key trends of technological advances determining the future of medicine and healthcare (part one and two); Stanford Medical School asked me to talk about the future of mobile health in a short film (below), moreover I’m working on a white paper about the future which should be published early September.

 

Recently, I’ve had a chance to talk and share views with Joe Flower, healthcare futurist of over 30 years of experience; and Ian Pearson, futurologist and author of You Tomorrow. What I wanted to discuss with them is the thin line between collecting trends and aspects about the future and working as a futurist; and they shared very important pieces of advice with me.

In a nutshell, the key is responsibility. Providing predictions about the future and assuming that such technologies will be used by people is relatively easy, compilation of trends is even easier, but coming up with concepts and trend waves which determine the real practical future of medicine taking economics and demographics into consideration, well that is the real job of  a medical futurist.

Let me give you an example. In 1950, the hospital of the future was described in this short video featuring baby drawers and lamps in the OR. It underscores the notion that predicting the future of medicine is extremely hard. Some special developments might get finalized in months, while other obvious ones might need decades.

 

Nowadays, we have to deal with issues such as cyborg overlords, simulating brain activity with computers, bionic eye implants,  the ethical dimensions of radical life extension, self-guided intubation robots, or smartwatches.cyborg

It means making accountable predictions requires advanced systems thinking, therefore I’m starting this open course now.

I want to be a medical futurist who not just collects the current trends and compiles them, but comes up with reasoning that lets all stakeholders of medicine prepare better for the future.

In order to strengthen this position, I will launch a daily newsletter about the future of healthcare soon.

The 7th step will be about the methods used by futuristic studies.

Steps taken so far:

Transforming Young Cancer Patients into Superheroes to Fight Cancer

A hospital in Brazil came up with the idea of transforming the drugs and therapies of young cancer patients into something different therefore they would feel like superheroes. They can be motivated during the therapy like that, moreover, compliance is better. Amazing idea!

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