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Posts from the ‘Medical education’ Category

Digital Literacy in the Medical Curriculum: Our Study Is Published!

After years of hard work of creating a unique curriculum that prepares medical students for the technological future of medicine, it is a huge pleasure to share the study we have been doing with them. We have measured how effectively such a curriculum of social media, mobile health and disruptive technologies can get them ready for what is coming next. The structure of the course was just featured by the blog of the Stanford Medical School.

The study, Digital Literacy in the Medical Curriculum: A Course With Social Media Tools and Gamification, is available in JMIR Medical Education.

Here is an excerpt from the abstract:

Conclusions: A well-designed course, improved by constant evaluation-based feedback, can be suitable for preparing students for the massive use of the Internet, social media platforms, and digital technologies. New approaches must be applied in modern medical education in order to teach students new skills. Such curriculums that put emphasis on reaching students on the online channels they use in their studies and everyday lives introduce them to the world of empowered patients and prepare them to deal with the digital world.


Being Patient-Centric Is Also About Good Design

Lucien Engelen recently invited me to serve as a judge in their Hacking Health Reshape competition and also to give a keynote on the opening day of the medical school for freshmen in Nijmegen.

I met there Prof. Stefaan Berge, head of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department of Radboud who told me he built the strategy of his department based on my latest book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine. On the poster below, there are 22 trends, the chapters of my book, that will shape the future of medicine. With his staff, they discussed which ones might have the biggest influence on the future of the department. As you can imagine, I felt pretty proud.


I checked all the equipment they have at Radboud such as the laparoscopic surgery simulation tool made of wood and simple elements that works with the Oculus Rift virtual reality headset. It is cheap and is occupied by students for many hours every day.


As Prof. Berge told me, being patient-centric as a hospital is also about design. They have such tables in the rooms where patients can discuss every detail with the physician.


When the physician needs to examine the patient, they “go” to the clinic which is the area within the blue line. Otherwise, it is just a room where they can talk.


And finally, I gave a keynote about the future of medicine for 4-500 freshmen medical students. I tried not to shock them too much but based on their faces, I might have failed in this. I simply demonstrated what their future practices could look like and what skills they need to learn while being in medical school. I wish someone had told me this when I was a freshman.  


The Transformation of Academic Health Centers

A new book, The Transformation of Academic Health Centers, was published by Elsevier and I was honored to be invited by C. Donald Combs, PhD, Vice President and Dean of the School of Health Professions at Eastern Virginia Medical School to co-author a chapter about how disruptive technologies are changing medical education.

Chapter 7: Disruptive Technologies Affecting Education and Their Implications for Curricular Redesign

Here you can find the book’s details.


Disruptive Technologies in Medicine: Preparing Medical Students For The Future!

At Semmelweis Medical School in Budapest, we launched a new course, “Disruptive Technologies in Medicine” with Professor Maria Judit Molnar MD, PhD, DSc, the scientific Vice Rector of Semmelweis University in 2014. I’m very happy to share that we launched it again this semester.

Our plan is to prepare medical students for those future technologies they will face by the time they start actually practicing medicine. We need to give future physicians skills that help deal with the coming waves of technological changes in a way that they will learn how to improve the human touch with better technologies.

Here are the topics we cover with experts.

  • How Exponential and Disruptive Technologies Shape The Future of Medicine
  • Personalized Medicine – Genomic Health
  • Point of Care Diagnostics
  • The Future of Medical Imaging
  • Social Media in Medicine
  • Harnessing Big Data in Healthcare, Cognitive Computers
  • The Future of Hospitals
  • Biotechnology and Gene Therapy
  • Mobile Health, The Wearable Revolution and Telemedicine
  • Regenerative Medicine, Optogenetics and 3D Printing
  • Medical Robotics, Bionics, Virtual Reality, and Future of Medical Technologies

We are teaching them offline and online at the same time with plenty of assignments and interesting projects such as collaboration with the students of the course of Kim Solez at University of Alberta.

Students compete against each other in a Facebook challenge by answering questions about the topics we cover in the lectures every single day.


5 Ways to Prepare The Doctors of The Future

Years ago when I was a medical student I felt that lexical knowledge was more important than actually being able to find the information I need. And now there are 23 million peer-reviewed papers on so the skill of being able to find information is becoming even more important than ever.

I thought that medical curriculum should be redesigned in a way that now we can serve this new need for skills such as digital literacy. That is why I launched the world’s first university course focusing on social media, mobile health and the future of medicine. The course is still running with full house.

In my new video, I described methods that help us prepare students for becoming physicians who can take care of their patients in a technological world. Here is the video and then summaries of the 5 methods.

Developing e-learning platforms

I launched an e-learning platform for my students on which they can check all the presentations with hand-outs, data, studies, plus they can do the tests online. If they complete the tests online, they can skip the written exam.

The Social MEDia Course

The Social MEDia Course

Engaging students through social media

As all my medical students have Facebook accounts; challenges, tasks about online activities and questions about the topics covered during the lectures are posted every day during the semester on the Facebook page of the course and students with the most bonus points do not have to take the written exam. They fight against each other.



The typical curriculum requires students to study texts and data by heart without proper reasoning and understanding the logic behind it. Instead, study through serious diagnostic games has clear advantages. The “Healing Blade” card game takes the player into a world of sorcery and creatures where real–world knowledge of infectious diseases and therapeutics play a pivotal role in the winning strategy. “Occam’s Razor” is a real diagnostic card game released by NerdCore Medical.


Creating a digital environment

I offer students the chance to interact with each other outside the curriculum online. If they need help in using a social media channel, they can find me online and I’m happy to help. With some of them, I’m still in touch even years after they completed my course. This way they can learn the tricks of online collaboration and it might be a simpler task when they have to do it as a part of their everyday job.

Rethinking the whole curriculum

At Radboud University Medical Center, they are currently working on a revolutionary new medical curriculum. The educational vision behind this transformation has been inspired by people all over the world who want to improve people’s lives through healthcare and education. In this system, each student has a personal coach. They work with a so–called open space technology in which students themselves decide what will be addressed when students and teachers meet. Currently, biomedical and medical students also work as consultants for pharmaceutical companies in an attempt to come up with innovative ideas. These young students still have a lot to learn, but it seems they learn very quickly when under pressure.

Please share what you think either as a student or a lecturer and read more about the future of medical education in my recent book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine!

The Guide to the Future of Medicine ebook cover

Channelling the future in medical education: Infographic!

I launched two courses at Semmelweis Medical School in order to prepare students for the digital world. One is focusing on the medical use of social media, and the other is dedicated to disruptive technologies and how to find the human touch in the digital jungle. Therefore I was very excited when Ashfield, an international healthcare services organization, asked me to be the moderator of a global discussion on the future of education.

I had a chance to work with key opinion leaders of medical education and to engage in amazing discussions about the future needs of medical professionals.

Medical education must ­finally step up to meet the expectations of empowered patients, the needs of busy physicians, and the use of disruptive technologies. This forum was designed to facilitate this process.

See the detailed article about the results on Pharmaphorum, the announcement by Ashfield and the whole infographic. Here is my favorite part and an excerpt from the article of Ruth Herman:

The digital revolution has already led to major changes in channel preferences as mobile technologies, online networks and other innovations provide better ways for healthcare professionals to learn and obtain new information. These changes are likely to continue as the digital skills and sophistication of both patient and physician populations continue to grow. So how can the providers of this information stay ahead?


Integrating Digital Literacy into Medical Education: AMMC Interview

I was asked by the Association of American Medical Colleges to share my opinions about digital literacy with their readers. I was glad to participate and one line of mine got quite an attention through their social media channels: “Today’s medical professionals must be masters of different skills that are related to using digital devices or online solutions.” I remain confident that is it the case today. They also included the thoughts of one of the best clinician bloggers worldwide, Bryan S. Vartabedian, M.D from the 33 Charts blog.

An excerpt from the interview:

Bertalan Meskó, M.D., Ph.D., a medical futurist who travels the world consulting and lecturing on digital literacy in health care, frames digital literacy as “the way that medical professionals can use digital devices as well as online solutions in communication with patients and their peers.” Meskó believes that “today’s medical professionals must be masters of different skills that are related to using digital devices or online solutions” and argues that mastering those skills “is now a crucial skill set that all medical professionals require.”



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