Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Medicine 2.0’ Category

Mayo Clinic Chiefs Name E-Patient Dave as 2015 Visiting Professor

Wonderful news! E-Patient Dave, the leader of the global e-patient movement who gave a talk last year at my Social Media in Medicine university course as well, was named Visiting Professor for Mayo Clinic.

Patient engagement and empowerment is a natural extension of Dr. Will Mayo’s vision of a medicine as a cooperative science. We are therefore honored to announce Dave deBronkart (aka “e-Patient Dave”) as our 2015 Visiting Professor to help spread this powerful message. We look forward to his March, 2015 visit!

Philips to Enroll Hereismydata™ Worldwide

My mentor and good friend, Lucien Engelen, Director of the Radboud REshape Innovation Center did it again! He transformed a great idea that can save a lot of lives globally into an actual product or service. Today, he announced that Philips will start enrolling Hereismydata worldwide in front of 140.000 people at the 3rd biggest IT event of the world, “Dreamforce” of Salesforce.com.

We at Hereismydata™ are creating a one-stop-and-go place to store your data. Secure, robust and you in control. Connecting apps and devices, creating clinical modules like the COPD module with Philips, and connecting services like Apple’s healthkit and (lateron) Google Fit and back and forth EMR’s will help to create insight in the patchwork of data out there.

They start with COPD but will add many more conditions soon. Combining all kinds of vendors, operating systems, and languages as well as local legislation issues that have been tackled creates the ecosystem he envisioned long ago.

This video explains how it works.

Medical Futurist to Forecast the New Era of Healthcare at ASCP Annual Meeting in Tampa

This is the title of the press release the American Society for Clinical Pathology published today about my keynote that I will give in this year’s meeting in Tampa. I look forward to talking about the future of genomics, wearable technologies and the patient-physician partnership, among others.

An excerpt from the press release:

“We are thrilled to announce that Dr. Meskó is hosting a general session at this year’s annual meeting,” commented Dr. E. Blair Holladay, CEO/Executive Vice President of ASCP. “His session will be an invigorating discussion on ways that new technology, such as genomics and next-generation sequencing, are providing pathologists and medical laboratory professionals with valuable tools to improve patient care.”

header_01

Why And How Healthcare Institutions Should Prepare For IBM Watson

What even the most acclaimed professors know cannot match cognitive computers. As the amount of information they accumulate grows exponentially, the assistance of computing solutions in medical decisions is imminent. While a physician can keep a few dozen study results and papers in mind, IBM’s supercomputer named Watson can process million pages in seconds. This remarkable speed has led to trying Watson in oncology centers to see how helpful it is in making treatment decisions in cancer care.

Watson is based on deep Q&A technology and gives a set of possible answers as the most relevant and likely outcomes to medical questions. But physicians make the final call. I have to note here that Watson is not there to replace the physicians, but to support them when making decisions. It also interacts with physicians and can suggest which additional tests are needed to generate a higher degree of confidence.

IBMWatson

The MD Anderson Center’s Oncology Expert Advisor

It is built to aid physicians in making evidence-informed decisions based on up-to-date knowledge. The system was designed to have three main capabilities:

  • Dynamic patient summary: Interpret structured and unstructured clinical data to create dynamic patient case summaries.
  • Evidence-based treatment options: Make treatment and management suggestions based on the patient profile weighed against consensus guidelines, relevant literature, and MD Anderson expertise.
  • Care pathway advisory: Provide care pathway advice that supports management of patients by alerting clinicians of adverse events or suggesting proactive care support.

When testing the accuracy of the system to recommend standard of care treatment related to 200 leukemia cases, the system had a false-positive rate of 2.9% and a false-negative rate of 0.4%. The overall accuracy of the standard of care recommendations was 82.6%.

The Memorial Sloan Kettering Oncology Advisor

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s expertise and experience with thousands of patients are the basis for teaching Watson how to translate data into actionable clinical practice based on a patient’s unique cancer. While initially focused only on breast and lung cancers, the work has expanded to more than a dozen other common solid and blood cancers such as colon, prostate, bladder, ovarian, cervical, pancreas, kidney, liver, and uterine, as well as melanomas and lymphomas. Watson digested the guidelines about Lung and Breast Cancer issued by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (roughly 500,000 unique combinations of breast cancer patient attributes; and roughly 50,000 unique combinations of lung cancer patient attributes). Over 600,000 pieces of evidence were digested from 42 different publications/publishers.

How to prepare

There is no doubt it will have a bigger and bigger impact on how we practice medicine worldwide. But all stakeholders in the system must prepare for that:

  1. Medical professionals should acquire basic knowledge about how AI works in a medical setting in order to understand how such solutions might help them in their everyday job.
  2. Decision makers at healthcare institutions should do everything to be able to measure the success and the effectiveness of the system. This is the only way to assess the quality of AI’s help in medical decision making.
  3. Companies such as IBM should communicate even more towards the general public about the potential advantages and risks of using AI in medicine.
  4. Non-English speaking countries should invest in natural language processing (NLP). If the patient information is not in English, Watson needs to understand the content and context of the structured and unstructured information in that language. To do this, it uses the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) and a semantic type recognition. The Watson Content Analytics (WCA) tool that processes NLP and is based on Unstructured Information Management Architecture (UIMA) is used for building annotations. WCA then uses a Medical Concept Extraction Tool and a Health Language Medical Terminology Management system that uses standard medical terminologies databases such as SNOMED, ICD-9, ICD-10, RxNorm, etc. And this is where most e.g. European countries miss the point. They don’t have all these systems in all the languages.

The other option is obviously to train physicians and nurses to document everything in English. But we can agree that this will never happen.

It is time to prepare in order to let technology help us do a better job in medicine.

This video provides a great summary about all these:

Five Expectations For Physicians About The Future of Medicine

The waves of technological changes coming towards us will generate new possibilities as well as serious threats to medicine and healthcare. Every stakeholder must prepare for these changes in order to reach a balance between using disruptive technologies in medicine and keeping the human touch.

I remain confident that it is still possible to establish that balance and there are reasons not only for patients but also for physicians to look forward to the next few years in medicine. Here are 5 of them.

1) Finally focus on patients

Technology is not against physicians and algorithms are not designed to replace them. Instead, by using efficient and simple technologies in the practice, physicians will finally have time and energy to focus on the patients.

Looking into their eyes while inputting data with augmented reality (Google Glass or digital contact lenses); listening to patients instead of trying to find the right information (as IBM Watson provides that already); and having access to all the devices that are needed to provide a good care (smartphones serving as biosensor packages). What is it if not a great prospect?

2) Avoid burning out

With supercomputers being used in medical decision making; physicians having skills related to digital literacy; using intuitive IT solutions that make it simple to input, export and move around data just like how children today use touchscreen devices; and getting access to the medical information they actually need, hours can be saved every week.

With less effort and time, they will be able to provide more care for their patients. This way, patient reward becomes an essential part again in the process of practicing medicine helping caregivers avoid burning out.

3) Use data that patients collect

The wearable revolution in health peaking this year gives patients the chance to take care of their own health, thus measure health parameters that have only been available and accessible in the ivory tower of medicine.

By bringing this data to the doctor visit, they can save time and effort, moreover, a true partnership between them can be established. As devices become better, cheaper and more efficient, physicians can soon start encouraging their patients to measure parameters relevant to their health and the results will be discussed and used during the next visit.

4) Crowdsource, crowdfund and crowdsolve

With the advances of social media and technologies that give access to these channels, no medical professional should feel alone when dealing with a complicated medical problem of challenge.

If information is needed, it can be crowdsourced; if funding is needed for a new project; it can be crowdfunded; and when a real medical solution is needed, they can find that through an inter-connected network of experts, resources and services.

5) Share responsibility with patients

Although it is now the responsibility of physicians to become the guides for their patients online (that requires new skills), by empowering them, actually responsibility can finally be shared. Medical professionals don’t have to make decisions alone, but in a close partnership with the patient.

But for this, every stakeholder must start preparing in time.

 

The most important trend in physician communications: Report

MDigitalLife released a report about the most important trend in physician communications. Read their statement and download the report here.

They also shared an interesting insight about my Twitter statistics.

ByJlbddIAAAGGGG

Here Is The Bionic Man

The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering released a website that features all the technologies and interventions that are being developed in research projects supported by them. It clearly shows how many futuristic developments are already on the way and might be used in practice soon. Here is the list:

  • Robotic leg prosthesis senses a person’s next move and provides powered assistance to achieve a more natural gait.
  • Cartilage regeneration: A light sensitive biogel and biological adhesive help new cartilage grow and become functional.
  • Blood clot emulator can be used to optimize ventricular assist devices to reduce the risk of blood clots.
  • Artificial kidney could be used in place of kidney dialysis for treatment of end-stage kidney disease.
  • Microneedle patch delivers vaccines painlessly and doesn’t require refrigeration.
  • Interstitial pressure sensor could help doctors determine optimal times for delivering chemotherapy/radiation to cancer patients.
  • Glucose-Sensing Contacts could provide a non-invasive solution for continuous blood sugar monitoring.
  • Tongue Drive System helps individuals with severe paralysis navigate their environment using only tongue movements.
  • Wireless Brain-Computer Interface records and transmits brain activity wirelessly and could allow people with paralysis to use their thoughts to control robotic arms or other devices.
  • Implantable Sensors for Prosthesis Control detect nerve signals above a missing limb and can use these signals to move a prosthesis in a more natural way.
  • Synthetic Tissue Adhesive: A synthetic glue modeled after an adhesive found in nature could be used to repair tissues in the body.
  • Opening the Blood Brain Barrier with Ultrasound could be used to temporarily open the blood brain barrier to let gene therapy treatments reach the brain.
  • Flexible Electrodes Record Brain’s Activity from the surface of the brain and could be used to control robotic arms or provide real-time information about brain states.
  • Spinal Stimulation is being used in individuals with paralysis to help restore voluntary movement and other functions.

 

1

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 40,928 other followers

%d bloggers like this: