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Posts from the ‘Medicine 2.0’ Category

Medical Specialties That Can Benefit from Google Glass

I’ve been writing about the potentials Google Glass might have in healthcare (see the list below the image) and now here is a great article describing some examples and medical specialties that could benefit from using it the most.

  1. Wound care
  2. Surgery
  3. Anesthesiology
  4. Intensive Care
  5. Emergency Response

I would definitely add medical education to the list. Now students don’t have to look over the shoulder of the surgeon but actually can watch what the surgeon is really seeing right now on huge HD screens.

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Here are some other articles dedicated to this issue:

 

Apple’s ‘Healthbook’ Coming Today?

The rumors have been around for some time now and today, Apple might announce a new product called Healthbook that focuses on tracking health. We will see! Stay tuned!

Apple will put on its big show at its world wide developers conferenceon Monday, and you can expect it to take the opportunity to introduce its long-rumored health and fitness app and platform, “Healthbook.”

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My Wearable Health Trackers: Tinké

Let me introduce you to my ever growing collection of wearable health trackers. This time, here is Tinké which is the only fitness & wellness tracker that measures Heart Rate, Respiratory Rate, Blood Oxygen saturation and Heart Rate Variability. Here are some key features:

  • Android and iOS versions
  • Free shipping worldwide
  • Measuring long-term fitness and current wellness
  • It provides the accuracy of every measurement to learn how to do it better next time
  • No battery required
  • Easy to share results and monitor progress
  • Connected to iPhones and works via Bluetooth for Androids

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Watch the video as well:

Here Is The World’s First Masters Degree in 3D Bioprinting

It is not surprising that universities are ready to take steps into obvious directions of technological advances such as 3D printing. Two Australian, a Dutch and a German university just created the world’s first masters degree program that will allow students to claim that they are masters of biofabrication.

Such bold moves truly show how education must change in order to meet today’s needs.

The two year program gives students one Master’s degree in Regenerative Medicine & Technology from one of the above Australian universities and one of the above European universities. QUT’s biofabrication research has become famous for 3D printing bioink scaffolds infused with a patient’s stem cells to help a woman grow a new breast after a mastectomy.

masters-degree-in-3D-bioprinting-Associate-Professor-Mia-Woodruff.

Medical Students At UC Irvine Get Google Glass

The UC Irvine medical school in California made a good decision and started experimenting with using augmented reality in the classrooms by giving medical students Google Glasses which might help them with anatomy, clinical skills, and hospital rotations.

As someone living with such digital technologies, I have to say if it is used in the right way, it will truly improve their chance for better studying the art of medicine, as well as their scores. Why not incorporating these in the traditional curriculum if they can add clear value to education?

Irvine will be the first medical school to fully incorporate Glass into its four-year curriculum. Its first- and second-year students will use the device in their anatomy and clinical skills courses, while third- and fourth-year students will wear Glass during their hospital rotations.

“I believe digital technology will let us bring a more impactful and relevant clinical learning experience to our students,” UC Irvine’s dean of medicine Dr. Ralph V. Clayman said in a statement. “Enabling our students to become adept at a variety of digital technologies fits perfectly into the ongoing evolution of healthcare into a more personalized, participatory, home-based and digitally driven endeavor.”

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Chapters of The Guide to the Future of Medicine: The Upcoming Book

I recently announced that I have been working on my new book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, that will showcase the trends that shape the future and a guide about how to prepare for them for any stakeholders of healthcare from patients and medical professionals to policy makers. It will be released this August.

It has been a great experience so far interviewing about 70 global experts from different industries, world famous companies and organizations. I thought I would share the topics of some of the 25 trends therefore future readers could get a glimpse of what to see soon in the book:

  • Health Sensors In and Outside The Body
  • DIY Biotechnology
  • Advanced Robotics
  • Artificial Intelligence in Medical Decision Support
  • Hospitals of the Future
  • Nanotechnology
  • The 3D Printing Revolution
  • The Rise of Recreational Cyborgs
  • and many more!

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Why Have I Been Quantifying My Health For 17 Years?

I gave a talk at the HQ of Prezi.com in Budapest a few days ago at the Quantified Self Meetup. I was asked to present the future opportunities of health wearables, but I had to realize I’m quite a quantifier myself.

In 1997, I started logging some details about my life and have been doing so without even one exception for 6136 days. I log the times when I go to bed or wake up; projects I worked on and a score between 1 and 10 for my mental, physical and emotional statuses.

Based on these, I could make important decisions about my life and lifestyle many times. Now I use different devices to make this process as smooth as possible backed by data.

  • I used genomic services three times (Navigenics, Pathway Genomics and GentleLab) and now have the raw data of my genome sequence.
  • AliveCor for ECG.
  • Withings Pulse for activity tracking.
  • Tinké for determining heart fitness.
  • Lumosity for improving my cognitive skills.
  • HapiFork to eat more slowly, thus less.
  • Withings Blood Pressure for simple blood pressure tracking.
  • Focus@Will for music designed for focus and also measuring the effectiveness of my sessions.
  • Pebble to replace my smartphone with the smartwatch in many cases.
  • InterAxon for EEG measurements (it has been shipped).

Now at the dawn of the wearable revolution, there are too many devices and the hype is too big, but we will get to the period of “meaningful use” soon!

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FDA Approvals For Wearable ECG Devices Now And Soon

I’ve been using Alivecor for measuring ECG on my smartphone and now I was glad to find out new similar devices also got FDA approvals or are seeking to get it. Here are the recent examples for the evolution of the wearable revolution:

McKesson secured clearance for a mobile medical app called McKesson Cardiology ECG Mobile.

Vital Connect received FDA clearance for its Vital Connect Platform, which is the system that supports the company’s peel-and-stick, Bandaid-like vital signs monitorHealthPatch.

Tel Aviv, Israel-based HealthWatch previewed its hWear line of tshirts with interwoven ECG sensors, allowing the shirt to function as a 3 to 15 lead ECG.

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IBM’s Watson Supercomputer Becoming The Best Doctor?

An interesting article was published on Business Insider. I’m not saying it’s technically impossible for an algorithm to become better at making diagnoses than a human, but it certainly should not be the ultimate goal in medicine. This is why I’m writing now my new book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, to underscore this notion with stories and practical examples.

A quote from the article:

“Watson, the supercomputer that is now the world Jeopardy champion, basically went to med school after it won Jeopardy,” MIT’s Andrew McAfee, coauthor of The Second Machine Age, said recently in an interview with Smart Planet. “I’m convinced that if it’s not already the world’s best diagnostician, it will be soon.”

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Read similar news on Medicalfuturist.com!

Race Among Medical Devices and Doctors: Analysis

For some time now, I’ve been forming a think tank that would focus on issues related to the future of medicine. As a first step, we decided to address the issue of the changing world of medical devices and how such changes might affect the lives of medical professionals and patients. Please feel free to comment on this analysis.

If we take a look at the possible scripts of the market competition in the health sector, we can make few predictions on the patients’ experience. The competition among the medical device manufacturers and the globalized competition among the high skilled health workers have significant social effects.

There are heterogeneous, jammed and loud worlds like in the motion picture Fifth Element, where many types of doctors and devices form the healthcare system. There could be a low-end/high end distinct health market, where the wealthy ones could afford a real-life practice, but the other patients are left alone. If some huge brands will cover the whole market, and provide the whole range of integrated services, they could become omnipotent monopolies, thus a standardized service could be provide wherever we are. And as a script we could have an expensive and closed world, where the insurances and the prevention are the tools against high cost.

Presentation1

 

Patients left alone

• Cheap devices without standardization

• Expensive doctors

• Need for self-healing increases

• Big difference between the online and real-life practice of medicine

• Popularity of alternative medicine grows

 

The internet based world

• Many doctors & devices

• Big problems with interoperability

• Android world

• Cheap doctors & devices

 

Expensive & closed world

• premium systems

• Healthcare costs take a big part of GDPs

• Active insurance market

• Large efforts in prevention

 

Omnipotent brands

• Device manufacturers attract patients

• Doctor is only the user of devices

• Doctors are global, but patients belong to manufacturers

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