Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Medicine 2.0’ Category

The Future Doctor Will Be A Moderator, Not A Sage: Change Is On The Way

There is a great article in The Irish Times about what the roles of future doctors should be. They quoted Dr. Eric Topol, Dr. Bryan Vartabedian and me based on my new book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine. I’ve been saying for long years that this patriarchal system of medicine with the physician on the top having access to all the medical information and the patient being a minor element should be dramatically changed and restructured.

With the advances of the global e-patient movement, there have been good steps but we need to take this hierarchy down to create a true partnership in which the physician using their medical knowledge and the patient dealing with their health management together can make the best potential decisions.

An excerpt from the article:

Dr Bertalan Mesko, in his recently published book The Guide to the Future of Medicine, says that ever-improving technologies “threaten to obscure the human touch, the doctor-patient relationship and the very delivery of healthcare”.

The doctor and medical futurist warns that these enormous technological changes could “wash away” the medical system as we know it and leave in its place a purely technology-based service without personal interaction.

“Such a complicated system should not be washed away. Rather it should be consciously and purposefully redesigned piece by piece,” Mesko argues.

image

The Guide to the Future of Medicine is Available: Download the E-book for Free!

I cannot tell you how happy I’m to announce the official release of my book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine which was just made available in black & white paperback, colored paperback and Kindle formats. Moreover, the Kindle format is for free (yes, totally free) until the 6th of September.

It contains over one year of hard work, 70 interviews and 22 trends that will shape the future of medicine including Augmented Reality, Surgical and Humanoid Robots, Genomics, Body Sensors, The Medical Tricorder, 3D Printing, Exoskeletons, Artificial Intelligence, Nanorobots, Virtual–Digital Brains, The Rise of Recreational Cyborgs or Cryonics and Longevity.

Through these, I challenged myself to prove that it is possible to use more and more disruptive technologies in medicine while successfully keeping the human touch.

With Lucien Engelen’s foreword, the many examples and extraordinary stories depicted in the book, you will hopefully get a clear picture where medicine and healthcare are heading at the moment, and more importantly, what we can do as patients, medical professionals or policy makers to prepare for the waves of change.

Please use the #medicalfuture hashtag on Twitter and tell me what you think!

The Guide to the Future of Medicine ebook cover

Integrating Digital Literacy into Medical Education: AMMC Interview

I was asked by the Association of American Medical Colleges to share my opinions about digital literacy with their readers. I was glad to participate and one line of mine got quite an attention through their social media channels: “Today’s medical professionals must be masters of different skills that are related to using digital devices or online solutions.” I remain confident that is it the case today. They also included the thoughts of one of the best clinician bloggers worldwide, Bryan S. Vartabedian, M.D from the 33 Charts blog.

An excerpt from the interview:

Bertalan Meskó, M.D., Ph.D., a medical futurist who travels the world consulting and lecturing on digital literacy in health care, frames digital literacy as “the way that medical professionals can use digital devices as well as online solutions in communication with patients and their peers.” Meskó believes that “today’s medical professionals must be masters of different skills that are related to using digital devices or online solutions” and argues that mastering those skills “is now a crucial skill set that all medical professionals require.”

digitalliteracy-data

The Guide to the Future of Medicine: Foreword by Lucien Engelen!

My book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, comes out on the 2nd of September and I’m happy to share with you the foreword written by Lucien Engelen, Director of REshape Innovation Center at Radboud University Medical Center. I got to know Lucien in person about 6 years ago and he has always been very kind to me giving me pieces of advice and suggestions related to transforming my visions into products and services. I consider him the No. 1. voice in the field of digital health worldwide. He has been consistently talking about the need for innovation and implementing his own visions into practice. This is really rare nowadays.

I knew from the time when I wrote the first words of my book that I would ask him to write the foreword. I cannot think of anyone else to introduce my readers to what I have to say in that book. 

Lucien wrote his own piece about this foreword on his widely popular Linkedin channel. An excerpt from that and the foreword:

In it you’ll find a lot of very interesting topics assembled into one place to guide you through your own journey. Since that is Berci’s biggest suggestion to you: start NOW exploring the world around you from an innovation perspective, find your own way, and choose your own battle.

My ‘prescription’ to you would be to read a chapter a day, digest it for another day, explore that area yourself for the day after, and then execute on it the next. But the chances you’ll read this book in one take are actually much higher, and that’s fine too. Next to this incredibly well written and overarching book, he’s also created a virtual landing space for the discussion on http://www.medicalfuturist.com. I really do hope to meet you there.

2cf02d9

Twenty-Two Trends Shaping the Future of Medicine: The List

My upcoming book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, will become available on Amazon.com in black&white paperback, colored paperback and Kindle formats in a few days, therefore I thought I would share an excerpt of the table of contents revealing what trends are featured and described in details through stories and a lot of pictures in the book.

Through these, I try to prove that we can use more and more disruptive technologies in medicine while successfully keeping the human touch.

Please feel free to comment on these trends here or by using the #medicalfuture hashtag on Twitter.

  • Empowered Patients
  • Gamifying Health
  • Eating in the future
  • Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality
  • Telemedicine and Remote Care
  • Re–thinking the Medical Curriculum
  • Surgical and Humanoid Robots
  • Genomics and Truly Personalized Medicine
  • Body Sensors Inside and Out
  • The Medical Tricorder and Portable Diagnostics
  • Do–It–Yourself Biotechnology
  • The 3D Printing Revolution
  • Iron Man: Powered exoskeletons and prosthetics
  • The End of Human Experimentation
  • Medical Decisions via Artificial Intelligence
  • Nanorobots Living In Our Blood
  • Hospitals of the Future
  • Virtual–Digital Brains
  • The Rise of Recreational Cyborgs
  • Cryonics and Longevity
  • What Will a Brand New Society Look Like?

The Guide to the Future of Medicine ebook cover

The Most Connected Man: Video

There is an amazing article about Chris Dancy, who I also interviewed for my upcoming book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, and who is considered the most connected man. Sometimes, I heard people commenting on his story/journey saying that he is focusing on technology too much and his case should not be an example for others.

Although I think he made it clear in this article why he is using a lot of wearables and sensors to make his life better.

“I’m the most connected man in the world to myself,” he says. “I’m not the most connected man in the world to technology. Technology was the route.”

AliveCor Receives FDA Clearance to Detect Atrial Fibrillation

I’ve been using AliveCor for over a year now and I think this is the best device for measuring 1-channel ECG. I’ve been saying that it should soon be available for use for patients as well. See their recent press release for the great news.

AliveCor, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted the company clearance for its algorithm to detect atrial fibrillation (AFib), the most common form of cardiac arrhythmia. AliveCor’s automated analysis process (algorithm) instantly detects if patients are experiencing AFib through real-time electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings taken on the mobile phone based AliveCor® Heart Monitor, so physicians can intervene before potentially life-threatening conditions, like strokes, occur. Through AliveCor’s ECG analysis service, patients can confirm their results with a U.S. board-certified cardiologist or a personal physician.

stacked-screenshots

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 40,869 other followers

%d bloggers like this: