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Posts from the ‘Medicine 2.0’ Category

Being in The Top 10 Internet-Smart Doctors in the World

It’s a great honor to be included again in the list of the top ten Internet-smart doctors in the world. Here is the full list and here are the details!

Doctors are increasingly using the internet, to communicate, to educate, and to use sometimes as medical devices. And now docs are tackling social media, which a few of the Top Ten do, in spades.   The Top Ten come from all over, from Australia to the Bay area.  There is one from the Netherlands, one from Hungary,, and one from Australia.  The other seven are Yanks.  And they are all MDs.

1) Eric Topol MD
2) Daniel Kraft M.D.
3) Berci Mesko MD
4) Mike Cadogan MD
5) Pieter Kubben MD
6) Peter Diamantis MD
7) Iltifat Husain, MD
8) Wen Dombrowski MD
9) Joe Kvedar MD
10) Larry Chu MD

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My CNN Article: 10 ways technology will save your life in the future

I was invited to write an article about 10 ways technology will save our lives in the future for CNN.com and I was happy to do so. It was featured today on the main page of CNN. I hope you will find it useful. Here is the introduction:

The medical and healthcare sectors are in the midst of rapid change, and it can be difficult to see which new technologies will have a long-lasting impact.

Ideally, the future of healthcare will balance innovative medical technologies with the human touch. Here, I’ve outlined the trends most likely to change our lives, now or in the near future.

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Fantasy Trials in Nephrology

This is not the first time I write about a great social media-based initiative in nephrology. Last time, I covered the social media campaign, NephMadness. Now here is UKidney’s Dream RCT Initiative:

Welcome the DreamRCT initiative. Below are fantasy trials created by nephrologists from around the world. Please vote on the relevance of the trial. Who knows? Perhaps an investigator will get some inspiration and decide do it! Submit yours today!

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Social Media in Clinical Practice: Chapter 17, Conclusions

When I realized Springer made the individual chapters of my book, Social Media in Clinical Practice, available, I thought it would be useful for future readers to get some insights about each chapter one by one.

Here is the short summary of what you can read about and an excerpt of the last chapter, Conclusions:

Social media has been clearly changing the way medicine is practiced and healthcare is delivered. The rising number of e-patients also initiated new movements in this area. Medical professionals of the twenty-first century must be able to meet the special needs of these patients and use digital technologies in their work and communication properly.

  • New skills have to be acquired in the digital era
  • There are some basic principles to keep in mind while using the Internet as a medical professional
  • A summary of purposes social media platforms can be used for
  • Links and Further Reading

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Chapters that have already been covered:

The “Social Media in Medicine” Course At Semmelweis University Launches!

I’m always very excited when the new semester of the Social Media in Medicine university course launches at Semmelweis University. I’ll introduce medical students to the world of social media by showing them a lot of practical examples; as well as to the world full of technological advances they will face when they leave medical school.

9 weeks, 15 extended topics, two surveys, one exam, and a lot of Facebook challenges every single day.

This course is still unique worldwide and I created a digital format as well so not only medical students and professionals at Semmelweis University can acquire such digital skills. Feel free to use the #HCSMcourse hashtag when communicating about the course.

Here is the timeline:

February 20: Introduction to social media and medicine
February 27: Medical search engines and the Google story
March 6: Solutions for information pollution and Medical communities
March 20: The mysteries of medical blogging
March 27: Crowdsourcing on Twitter for medical purposes
April 10: The world of e-patients; The era of Youtube and mobile apps
April 24: Wikipedia: the power of masses; Collaboration online
May 8: Education 2.0; written test
May 15: The future of medicine and the internet; results of the surveys

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Social Media in Clinical Practice: Chapter 16, Social Bookmarking

When I realized Springer made the individual chapters of my book, Social Media in Clinical Practice, available, I thought it would be useful for future readers to get some insights about each chapter one by one.

Here is the short summary of what you can read about and an excerpt of the sixteenth chapter, Social Bookmarking:

Communication with patients and colleagues and being up-to-date in a field of interest can be time consuming and solutions saving time and effort are very much needed in the medical profession. It is also a common case that medical professionals have to work on different computers, laptops or mobile devices such as smartphones or tablets and synchronizing information is challenging.

  • The main features of social bookmarking websites and services
  • Examples of social bookmarking sites

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Chapters that have already been covered:

MD Anderson Cancer Center to Use IBM Watson

Do you remember what I predicted for 2014? This is what I wrote:

2) IBM Watson’s first commercial use by hospitals: IBM’s supercomputer has been tested by US clinics for months and it has proven its validity and value in medical decision-making processes. The first hospitals that make their doctors understand that Watson does not replace them, instead, it assists them, will buy the service in 2014.

Now the MD Anderson Cancer Center made an important step:

A few weeks ago, after I started one of my leukemia patients at MD Anderson Cancer Center on a standard course of chemotherapy, my patient developed a potentially life-threatening complication that sometimes occurs during leukemia treatment. It’s called tumor lysis syndrome. If not treated proactively, it can cause kidney failure, a heart attack and even death. A computing system based on IBM’s Watson technology that we’re currently piloting alerted me to the situation. I took action immediately. He’s okay now.

Disruptive Technologies in Medicine: Preparing Medical Students For The Future!

I’m very excited to announce that this semester we launch a new course, “Disruptive Technologies in Medicine” with Professor Maria Judit Molnar MD, PhD, DSc, the scientific Vice Rector of Semmelweis University. Our plan is to prepare medical students for those future technologies they will face by the time they start actually practicing medicine. I want to persuade them that the relation between the human touch and technologies is AND instead of OR.

Here are the topics we will cover with experts.

  • How Exponential and Disruptive Technologies Shape The Future of Medicine
  • Personalized Medicine – Genomic Health
  • Point of Care Diagnostics
  • The Future of Medical Imaging
  • Social Media in Medicine
  • Harnessing Big Data in Healthcare
  • Biotechnology and Gene Therapy
  • Mobile Health and Telemedicine
  • Regenerative Medicine, Optogenetics and 3D Printing
  • Medical Robotics, Bionics, Virtual Reality, and Future of Medical Technologies

We are going to teach them offline and online at the same time with plenty of assignments and interesting projects such as collaboration with the students of the course of Kim Solez at University of Alberta.

Feel free to follow all the developments and announcements of the course on Facebook. All the seats are already taken by international students. This is going to be an amazing semester!

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Breastfeeding Mothers Getting Help From Google Glass?

I always try to find new ways of using Google Glass in healthcare, but to be honest, I have never thought of this option.

New mothers struggling with breastfeeding may soon have the latest technology at their disposal to get expert help at any time of day.

The Melbourne office of an innovation company called Small World is about to conduct a Google Glass trial with the Australian Breastfeeding Association that will effectively allow their telephone counsellors to see through the eyes of mothers while they breastfeed at home.

The company is looking for 10 Victorian women expecting to give birth in February who want to trial the high-tech glasses for six to eight weeks to receive breastfeeding coaching.

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Social Media in Clinical Practice: Chapter 15, E-mails and Privacy Concerns

When I realized Springer made the individual chapters of my book, Social Media in Clinical Practice, available, I thought it would be useful for future readers to get some insights about each chapter one by one.

Here is the short summary of what you can read about and an excerpt of the fifteenth chapter, E-mails and Privacy Concerns:

E-mail or electronic mail is a method of sending and receiving digital messages online. This is one of the most common forms of online communication and while patients usually send simple questions via e-mail to their doctors, it might contain sensitive information which could lead to legal consequences if medical professionals do not know about such potential issues and the ways to avoid these.

  • The most common topics in patients’ e-mails include
  • The potential advantages and disadvantages of using e-mails in the doctor-patient relationship
  • A typical e-mail consists of these elements
  • Suggestions About Dealing with E-mails
  • Privacy Concerns in Social Media

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Chapters that have already been covered:

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