Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Medicine’ Category

Medical Futurist to Forecast the New Era of Healthcare at ASCP Annual Meeting in Tampa

This is the title of the press release the American Society for Clinical Pathology published today about my keynote that I will give in this year’s meeting in Tampa. I look forward to talking about the future of genomics, wearable technologies and the patient-physician partnership, among others.

An excerpt from the press release:

“We are thrilled to announce that Dr. Meskó is hosting a general session at this year’s annual meeting,” commented Dr. E. Blair Holladay, CEO/Executive Vice President of ASCP. “His session will be an invigorating discussion on ways that new technology, such as genomics and next-generation sequencing, are providing pathologists and medical laboratory professionals with valuable tools to improve patient care.”

header_01

Why And How Healthcare Institutions Should Prepare For IBM Watson

What even the most acclaimed professors know cannot match cognitive computers. As the amount of information they accumulate grows exponentially, the assistance of computing solutions in medical decisions is imminent. While a physician can keep a few dozen study results and papers in mind, IBM’s supercomputer named Watson can process million pages in seconds. This remarkable speed has led to trying Watson in oncology centers to see how helpful it is in making treatment decisions in cancer care.

Watson is based on deep Q&A technology and gives a set of possible answers as the most relevant and likely outcomes to medical questions. But physicians make the final call. I have to note here that Watson is not there to replace the physicians, but to support them when making decisions. It also interacts with physicians and can suggest which additional tests are needed to generate a higher degree of confidence.

IBMWatson

The MD Anderson Center’s Oncology Expert Advisor

It is built to aid physicians in making evidence-informed decisions based on up-to-date knowledge. The system was designed to have three main capabilities:

  • Dynamic patient summary: Interpret structured and unstructured clinical data to create dynamic patient case summaries.
  • Evidence-based treatment options: Make treatment and management suggestions based on the patient profile weighed against consensus guidelines, relevant literature, and MD Anderson expertise.
  • Care pathway advisory: Provide care pathway advice that supports management of patients by alerting clinicians of adverse events or suggesting proactive care support.

When testing the accuracy of the system to recommend standard of care treatment related to 200 leukemia cases, the system had a false-positive rate of 2.9% and a false-negative rate of 0.4%. The overall accuracy of the standard of care recommendations was 82.6%.

The Memorial Sloan Kettering Oncology Advisor

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s expertise and experience with thousands of patients are the basis for teaching Watson how to translate data into actionable clinical practice based on a patient’s unique cancer. While initially focused only on breast and lung cancers, the work has expanded to more than a dozen other common solid and blood cancers such as colon, prostate, bladder, ovarian, cervical, pancreas, kidney, liver, and uterine, as well as melanomas and lymphomas. Watson digested the guidelines about Lung and Breast Cancer issued by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (roughly 500,000 unique combinations of breast cancer patient attributes; and roughly 50,000 unique combinations of lung cancer patient attributes). Over 600,000 pieces of evidence were digested from 42 different publications/publishers.

How to prepare

There is no doubt it will have a bigger and bigger impact on how we practice medicine worldwide. But all stakeholders in the system must prepare for that:

  1. Medical professionals should acquire basic knowledge about how AI works in a medical setting in order to understand how such solutions might help them in their everyday job.
  2. Decision makers at healthcare institutions should do everything to be able to measure the success and the effectiveness of the system. This is the only way to assess the quality of AI’s help in medical decision making.
  3. Companies such as IBM should communicate even more towards the general public about the potential advantages and risks of using AI in medicine.
  4. Non-English speaking countries should invest in natural language processing (NLP). If the patient information is not in English, Watson needs to understand the content and context of the structured and unstructured information in that language. To do this, it uses the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) and a semantic type recognition. The Watson Content Analytics (WCA) tool that processes NLP and is based on Unstructured Information Management Architecture (UIMA) is used for building annotations. WCA then uses a Medical Concept Extraction Tool and a Health Language Medical Terminology Management system that uses standard medical terminologies databases such as SNOMED, ICD-9, ICD-10, RxNorm, etc. And this is where most e.g. European countries miss the point. They don’t have all these systems in all the languages.

The other option is obviously to train physicians and nurses to document everything in English. But we can agree that this will never happen.

It is time to prepare in order to let technology help us do a better job in medicine.

This video provides a great summary about all these:

The Medical Futurist: Weekly Introduction

Working as a speaker and consultant with medical technology, pharmaceutical and web companies; as well as universities and governments worldwide, my mission as The Medical Futurist is to make sure the advances of technology lead to a better healthcare for everyone!

ScreenShot

I publish a daily newsletter about the future of medicine, manage a popular Facebook page about the future and share related news almost every hour on Twitter.

Here is my new book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine:

KONYVBORITO_online final s 350

I’m also the author of Social Media in Clinical Practice handbookand the founder of Webicina.com, a service that curates medical content in social media for medical professionals and e-patients.

I launched The Social MEDia Course, the e-learning format of my university course focusing on medicine and social media for medical students, physicians and also patients with Prezis, tests and gamification.

I hope you will enjoy reading Scienceroll.com!

Sit smart for a healthy body and mind

I came across a very interesting concept on Kickstarter. It helps us how to sit in a more healthy way while working. Please meet Darma:

Darma is the world’s first “inactivity tracker” – a non-invasive smart cushion to monitor your sitting habits and improve your physical and mental health. Darma uses novel sensor technology and algorithms to offer actionable guidance to improve posture, balance sitting time and reduce stress.

a4b319dadec44dd771b44769526f7618_large

The New Europe 100 List

It is an honor to be included in the “New Europe 100” list. I remain confident that the success of an innovation depends on good ideas and hard work, but not geographical regions.

Res Publica together with Google and the Visegrad Fund in cooperation with Financial Times and dozens of institutions from the region is launching the New Europe 100 project – a list of outstanding challengers from Central and Eastern Europe.

Drukowanie

A few details about the lifestyle of the innovators.

ne100.ebredes.es.reggeli.ital.exact726w ne100.elso.munkahely.exact726w ne100.sportok.es.inspiracio.exact726w

10 Digital Health Mavens to Watch

Fard Johnmar from Enspektos kindly included me in the list of the 10 digital health mavens to watch. Here is the list:

10 Promising Technologies Assisting the Future of Medicine

Ray Kurzweil says technology is improving at an exponential rate. Peter Thiel says technological innovations couldn’t live up to the expectations. There are plenty of philosophies and schools of thought, but regarding the future of medicine, only two things are certain.

Technology will not solve the problems that healthcare faces globally today. And the human touch alone is not enough any more, therefore a new balance is needed between using disruptive innovations but still keeping the human interaction between patients and caregivers. Here are 10 technologies and trends that could enable this.

You can read the whole article on my Kinja page.

immersive2

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 40,906 other followers

%d bloggers like this: