Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Medicine’ Category

British Medical Journal Becomes ‘Patients Included’

The concept of the “patients included act” was developed by Lucien Engelen of the REshape Center from the of Radboud University Medical Center in 2010. Conferences featuring actual patients as speakers or attendees could receive this prestigious badge.

Now, Prof. Dr. Melvin Samson, chairman of the Board of the Radboud University Medical Center in Nijmegen awarded the British Medical Journal a special “Patients Included” certificate to acknowledge and encourage their focus on the involvement of patients in the field of medical publishing. Well done!

Read the official announcement here.

026cc30

My Wearable Health Trackers: Withings

In this edition of my series about wearable health trackers that I use, I have described Tinké and AliveCor. Now let me share my experience of using Withings products. Withings has developed plenty of trackers from smart body analyzers and activity trackers to blood pressure monitor or baby scale. I’ve been using their Pulse activity tracker and the smart Blood Pressure Monitor.

The Pulse is really small, easy to wear, measures the number of steps I take, number of calories I burn, the distance I cover; and can measure oxygen saturation as well as monitor my sleep. The device can be controlled by a small button on the top, but also, and it is remarkably well-designed, by swiping my finger on the screen to change the parameters.

What I like the most is the sleep monitor functionality that helps me assess the quality of sleeping time. It shows me how much time it took to go to sleep, how much light and deep sleep I actually had.

 

af5r-800

The Blood Pressure monitor is wireless, user-friendly (only has one start button), and makes proper measurements (I compared it to traditional devices). My only concern with that is the Bluetooth connection as every time when I want to initiate a measurement, I have to remove the device from my phone’s “Bluetooth connected devices” list and add it again. It is a bit frustrating, but it still causes less hassle than using old gadgets.

Withings-Wireless-Blood-Pressure-Monitor

Regarding the common Withings app (there is one app for all their devices), the visualizations of measurements could allow a smoother zooming, otherwise it provides what it has to provide.

As a company producing more types of health trackers, so far, Withings seems to be the best one taking design, functionalities and user experience into consideration.

My Wearable Health Trackers: AliveCor

The next item in this series of wearable health trackers is AliveCor which I have been using for over a year now and I consider it the most useful tracker these days. AliveCor has a brave mission of developing a device that measures ECG of the heart at home in clinically approved quality. It provides a one channel ECG and has been shrinking in size over the last couple of versions (see the images below).

AliveCor-ECG

The old device working only with iPhones.

AliveCor-versatile-heart-monitor

The new, universal device.

A few key features:

  • Universal device working with any smartphones.
  • Stores the ECG measurements in the cloud in a safe format.
  • Results can be sent by e-mail in PDF format.
  • It highlights educational materials about different diagnoses and measurements.
  • Users can request professional analysis for a fee.
  • It is FDA approved.

AliveCor is the health tracker every medical professional is impressed about when I show it to them during my talks.

Here is a video about how it works in action:

The Medical Futurist: Weekly Introduction

As a medical futurist, I work on bringing disruptive technologies to medicine & healthcare; assisting medical professionals and students in using these in an efficient and secure way; and educating e-patients about how to become equal partners with their caregivers.

I publish a daily newsletter about the future of medicine, and share related news almost every hour on Twitter. Scienceroll.com is updated on a regular basis about the future of healthcare with an emphasis on social media. Here is my white paper, The Guide to the Future of Medicine.

I’m the author of Social Media in Clinical Practice handbookand the founder of Webicina.com, a service that curates medical content in social media for medical professionals and e-patients.

ScreenShot

I launched The Social MEDia Course, the e.learning format of my university course focusing on medicine and social media for medical students, physicians and also patients with Prezis, tests and gamification.

My recent keynote at TEDxNijmegen:

I hope you will enjoy reading Scienceroll.com!

Medical Specialties That Can Benefit from Google Glass

I’ve been writing about the potentials Google Glass might have in healthcare (see the list below the image) and now here is a great article describing some examples and medical specialties that could benefit from using it the most.

  1. Wound care
  2. Surgery
  3. Anesthesiology
  4. Intensive Care
  5. Emergency Response

I would definitely add medical education to the list. Now students don’t have to look over the shoulder of the surgeon but actually can watch what the surgeon is really seeing right now on huge HD screens.

google-glass-surgeon-1-537x402

 

Here are some other articles dedicated to this issue:

 

Apple’s ‘Healthbook’ Coming Today?

The rumors have been around for some time now and today, Apple might announce a new product called Healthbook that focuses on tracking health. We will see! Stay tuned!

Apple will put on its big show at its world wide developers conferenceon Monday, and you can expect it to take the opportunity to introduce its long-rumored health and fitness app and platform, “Healthbook.”

toddham_iwatch_all (1)

 

The Ethics of Neuroenhancement

I’ve come across a very interesting article about neuroenhancement, the era when it becomes possible to augment our cognitive capabilities through various methods quickly and efficiently. This era will raise a huge amount of ethical questions but I remain certain we will find solutions for all these.

For the unititiated, neuroenhancement is the idea that if we can use neuroscience therapies to treat impaired patients, we can also use it to enable healthy humans to do things better somehow. Besides the alleged cramming qualities of the usual pills littering university libraries, claims range from being able to make you smarter, faster, more charming—and even more moral. From drugs to headsets to far more ambiguous “neuro drinks,” the American Psychological Association estimates that neuroenhancement is now a billion dollar industry.

But how much of this is capitalist-inflated sci-fi, how much of it is a reality, and how much is there to worry about? The Brain Boosters event was as much about setting the record straight about the state of the technology as it was about testing the waters to see how the audience—“enhanced” by their drinks in hand—felt about the ethical considerations about the course the research might take in the future.

3

Stanford Inventors Designs Safe Way to Transfer Energy to Medical Chips in The Body

A very interesting video was published by Stanford University in which inventors describe how they re-designed batteries not to be bigger than a grain of rice therefore medical devices implanted into the body could be much much smaller.

The Medical Futurist: Weekly Introduction

As a medical futurist, I work on bringing disruptive technologies to medicine & healthcare; assisting medical professionals and students in using these in an efficient and secure way; and educating e-patients about how to become equal partners with their caregivers.

I publish a daily newsletter about the future of medicine, and share related news almost every hour on Twitter. Scienceroll.com is updated on a regular basis about the future of healthcare with an emphasis on social media. Here is my white paper, The Guide to the Future of Medicine.

I’m the author of Social Media in Clinical Practice handbookand the founder of Webicina.com, a service that curates medical content in social media for medical professionals and e-patients.

ScreenShot

I launched The Social MEDia Course, the e.learning format of my university course focusing on medicine and social media for medical students, physicians and also patients with Prezis, tests and gamification.

My recent keynote at TEDxNijmegen:

I hope you will enjoy reading Scienceroll.com!

Here Is The World’s First Masters Degree in 3D Bioprinting

It is not surprising that universities are ready to take steps into obvious directions of technological advances such as 3D printing. Two Australian, a Dutch and a German university just created the world’s first masters degree program that will allow students to claim that they are masters of biofabrication.

Such bold moves truly show how education must change in order to meet today’s needs.

The two year program gives students one Master’s degree in Regenerative Medicine & Technology from one of the above Australian universities and one of the above European universities. QUT’s biofabrication research has become famous for 3D printing bioink scaffolds infused with a patient’s stem cells to help a woman grow a new breast after a mastectomy.

masters-degree-in-3D-bioprinting-Associate-Professor-Mia-Woodruff.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 39,609 other followers

%d bloggers like this: