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Posts from the ‘Medicine’ Category

The Medical Futurist: Weekly Introduction

As a medical futurist, I work on bringing disruptive technologies to medicine & healthcare; assisting medical professionals and students in using these in an efficient and secure way; and educating e-patients about how to become equal partners with their caregivers.

I publish a daily newsletter about the future of medicine, and share related news almost every hour on Twitter. Scienceroll.com is updated on a regular basis about the future of healthcare with an emphasis on social media. Here is my white paper, The Guide to the Future of Medicine.

I’m the author of Social Media in Clinical Practice handbookand the founder of Webicina.com, a service that curates medical content in social media for medical professionals and e-patients.

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I launched The Social MEDia Course, the e.learning format of my university course focusing on medicine and social media for medical students, physicians and also patients with Prezis, tests and gamification.

My recent keynote at TEDxNijmegen:

I hope you will enjoy reading Scienceroll.com!

3D Printing Vascular Networks

The technique of 3D printing clearly went mainstream this year. 2014 was the turning point. After successfully printing out in 3D working liver tissues, heart valves, prostheses, medical equipment and many more, it is ready to revolutionize almost every aspect of medicine.

As printing out biomaterials is possible and actually faster than growing cells in laboratories, we might not be far from printing out living organs eradicating organ donor waiting lists forever.

In the latest developments, scientists from the Universities of Sydney, Harvard, Stanford and MIT made a groundbreaking announcement that they have worked out a technique making such vascularisation possible within the 3D bioprinting process. It means now it became possible to create vascular networks within printed biomaterials, then organs as well. Here is a summary of the method:

To achieve this, the researchers used an extremely advanced bioprinter to fabricate tiny fibers, all interconnected, which would represent the complex vascular structure of an organ. They coated the fibers with human organs-3endothelial cells, and then covered it with a protein based material, rich in cells. The cell infused material was then hardened with the application of light. Once hardened the researchers carefully removed the coated fibers, leaving behind an intricate network of tiny spaces throughout the hardened cell material. The human endothelial cells were left behind, along the tiny spaces created by the fibers, which after a week self organized into stable capillaries.

organs-feat

The Guide to the Future of Medicine: Submitted

After 8 months of hard work, I just submitted the manuscript of my upcoming book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, to the editor. Over 70 interviews and a lot of examples.

I cannot tell you how excited I’m about its release this August. 3D printing organs, artificial intelligence, home diagnostics, digital brains and many more topics in a guide that is meant to prepare all of us for the future of medicine. It’s coming soon!

The Birth of Artificial Intelligence

The Medical Futurist: Weekly Introduction

As a medical futurist, I work on bringing disruptive technologies to medicine & healthcare; assisting medical professionals and students in using these in an efficient and secure way; and educating e-patients about how to become equal partners with their caregivers.

I publish a daily newsletter about the future of medicine, and share related news almost every hour on Twitter. Scienceroll.com is updated on a regular basis about the future of healthcare with an emphasis on social media. Here is my white paper, The Guide to the Future of Medicine.

I’m the author of Social Media in Clinical Practice handbookand the founder of Webicina.com, a service that curates medical content in social media for medical professionals and e-patients.

ScreenShot

I launched The Social MEDia Course, the e.learning format of my university course focusing on medicine and social media for medical students, physicians and also patients with Prezis, tests and gamification.

My recent keynote at TEDxNijmegen:

I hope you will enjoy reading Scienceroll.com!

Social Media in Clinical Practice: The Handbook

Springer published my book, Social Media in Clinical Practice, almost a year ago and since then, I have received an amazing number of photos about people holding the book, social media posts and e-mails from readers who found my handbook to be very helpful in their professional lives. While the content is fortunately still up-to-date, it seems the turn-around time for a new book is about one year as lately, the number of messages has dramatically increased.

Medical professionals worldwide shared their insights, experience and suggestions about using social media resources in medicine using my book’s examples. Therefore, I’d like to ask anyone who likes to discuss such topics to use the #hcsm hashtag on Twitter or contact me directly, I’m always happy to initiate new discussions.

Here you can check out the detailed descriptions of all the chapters.

Dr Mesko_Social Media in Clinical Practice Cover

Apple or Google? Maybe WebMD?

It has been rumored that Apple would come up with something truly innovative related to the wearable health trackers. Then what they actually came up with was less then people expected. Days later, Google announced its Google Fit project. But maybe a third applicant could be the winner as WebMD just released its application and the mission statement behind the smartphone app is that we can measure more and more health parameters about ourselves, but what matters is how we interpret the data.

On Monday, WebMD launched a new program in its iOS app called Healthy Target that works with activity trackers like Fitbit and Jawbone, as well as glucometers and wireless scales, to aggregate and pull in health data.

HealthyTarget

British Medical Journal Becomes ‘Patients Included’

The concept of the “patients included act” was developed by Lucien Engelen of the REshape Center from the of Radboud University Medical Center in 2010. Conferences featuring actual patients as speakers or attendees could receive this prestigious badge.

Now, Prof. Dr. Melvin Samson, chairman of the Board of the Radboud University Medical Center in Nijmegen awarded the British Medical Journal a special “Patients Included” certificate to acknowledge and encourage their focus on the involvement of patients in the field of medical publishing. Well done!

Read the official announcement here.

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My Wearable Health Trackers: Withings

In this edition of my series about wearable health trackers that I use, I have described Tinké and AliveCor. Now let me share my experience of using Withings products. Withings has developed plenty of trackers from smart body analyzers and activity trackers to blood pressure monitor or baby scale. I’ve been using their Pulse activity tracker and the smart Blood Pressure Monitor.

The Pulse is really small, easy to wear, measures the number of steps I take, number of calories I burn, the distance I cover; and can measure oxygen saturation as well as monitor my sleep. The device can be controlled by a small button on the top, but also, and it is remarkably well-designed, by swiping my finger on the screen to change the parameters.

What I like the most is the sleep monitor functionality that helps me assess the quality of sleeping time. It shows me how much time it took to go to sleep, how much light and deep sleep I actually had.

 

af5r-800

The Blood Pressure monitor is wireless, user-friendly (only has one start button), and makes proper measurements (I compared it to traditional devices). My only concern with that is the Bluetooth connection as every time when I want to initiate a measurement, I have to remove the device from my phone’s “Bluetooth connected devices” list and add it again. It is a bit frustrating, but it still causes less hassle than using old gadgets.

Withings-Wireless-Blood-Pressure-Monitor

Regarding the common Withings app (there is one app for all their devices), the visualizations of measurements could allow a smoother zooming, otherwise it provides what it has to provide.

As a company producing more types of health trackers, so far, Withings seems to be the best one taking design, functionalities and user experience into consideration.

My Wearable Health Trackers: AliveCor

The next item in this series of wearable health trackers is AliveCor which I have been using for over a year now and I consider it the most useful tracker these days. AliveCor has a brave mission of developing a device that measures ECG of the heart at home in clinically approved quality. It provides a one channel ECG and has been shrinking in size over the last couple of versions (see the images below).

AliveCor-ECG

The old device working only with iPhones.

AliveCor-versatile-heart-monitor

The new, universal device.

A few key features:

  • Universal device working with any smartphones.
  • Stores the ECG measurements in the cloud in a safe format.
  • Results can be sent by e-mail in PDF format.
  • It highlights educational materials about different diagnoses and measurements.
  • Users can request professional analysis for a fee.
  • It is FDA approved.

AliveCor is the health tracker every medical professional is impressed about when I show it to them during my talks.

Here is a video about how it works in action:

The Medical Futurist: Weekly Introduction

As a medical futurist, I work on bringing disruptive technologies to medicine & healthcare; assisting medical professionals and students in using these in an efficient and secure way; and educating e-patients about how to become equal partners with their caregivers.

I publish a daily newsletter about the future of medicine, and share related news almost every hour on Twitter. Scienceroll.com is updated on a regular basis about the future of healthcare with an emphasis on social media. Here is my white paper, The Guide to the Future of Medicine.

I’m the author of Social Media in Clinical Practice handbookand the founder of Webicina.com, a service that curates medical content in social media for medical professionals and e-patients.

ScreenShot

I launched The Social MEDia Course, the e.learning format of my university course focusing on medicine and social media for medical students, physicians and also patients with Prezis, tests and gamification.

My recent keynote at TEDxNijmegen:

I hope you will enjoy reading Scienceroll.com!

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