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Posts from the ‘Medicine’ Category

The Medical Futurist: Weekly Introduction

Working as a speaker and consultant with medical technology, pharmaceutical and web companies; as well as universities and governments worldwide, my mission as The Medical Futurist is to make sure the advances of technology lead to a better healthcare for everyone!

I publish a daily newsletter about the future of medicine, manage a popular Facebook page about the future; launched a Youtube channel and share related news almost every hour on Twitter.

Here is my new book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine:

KONYVBORITO_online final s 350

I’m also the author of Social Media in Clinical Practice handbookand the founder of Webicina.com, a service that curates medical content in social media for medical professionals and e-patients.

I launched The Social MEDia Course, the e-learning format of my university course focusing on medicine and social media for medical students, physicians and also patients with Prezis, tests and gamification.

I hope you will enjoy reading Scienceroll.com!

Why Predicting The Future Of Medicine Is Hard – Video

Science fiction movies sometimes show us a great future, but in medicine, they almost always make a huge mistake. There are 3 major reasons why predicting the future in medicine & healthcare is hard, if not impossible.

Please do share what you think.

5 Healthcare Startups Among The 30 Innovative Companies Changing The World

CNN came up with the Upstart30 list that features 30 innovative companies that are changing the world. The only good thing about such lists is that you can come across startups you have never heard of before. Here are 5 healthcare startups from the list:

  • uBiome: genetic sequencing of your microbiome, the microbes living in your digestive system.
  • Ovuline: data on menstrual cycles and physical and emotional symptoms to predict when a woman is most fertile.
  • Honor: In elderly care, they screen and assign caretakers to seniors based on skills.
  • Eko Devices: Using Bluetooth technology, the Core sends digital recordings of heartbeats to Eko’s app and web portal. Doctors can chart the heartbeat or send the recording to a specialist for further review.
  • BioBots‘ first product is a revolutionary 3D printer for building cells, tissues and organs. The printer uses a chemical that works with visible blue light technology, which doesn’t harm the cells.

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Dealing With Data From Wearables

I use plenty of devices to obtain data about my lifestyle and health parameters. My only intention behind that is living a better and healthier life. But dealing with the awful amount of data is a struggle. I could improve my sleep, daily fitness or concentration one by one, but combining data requires me being a researcher, a doctor and a geek. It seems I’m not alone with this problem.

There’s hope for wearable devices that actually take the types of measurements that would be helpful for health monitoring. But realizing that hope will probably mean moving on to radically new technologies. And it will certainly mean developing devices that are able to take a wider variety of measurements.

Instead, I would love to use an app or a service that draws conclusions for me based on my wearables. I wrote about Exist.io a few days ago and I decided to give it a try. A long story short, it was not a success.

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Conclusions it provided based on my schedule, sleep quality, daily activities, Twitter and Instagram profiles were not useful and I can draw better ones myself. While I wished such an app could help me in my quest of living a healthy life, but I’m a bit glad it didn’t work out fine. That might be a sign that we should not rely on an app when making decisions about lifestyle. They could help us, but the decision must be ours.

I’m pretty sure Exist will get better and IBM Watson will soon join this market with its smart algorithms. Maybe after the wearable revolution, we will not only get flooded by sensors, but by better apps. And maybe Google’s new wearable might change things. Until then, I keep on thinking about what changes I can make in my lifestyle based on what I measure.

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If you know of such apps, please let me know. Thank you!

10 Thoughts About The Future Of Medicine

I give about 90-100 talks per year and in every case I get really exciting questions from laypeople, industry experts, medical professionals, students, and engineers. They come up with amazing ideas and I thought that I would collect those 10 thoughts which might really shape the future of medicine. Here they are as a list and then in details in the video.

  1. Being up-to-date
  2. Be skeptic about bad technologies
  3. Read and watch science fiction
  4. Be proactive
  5. We will become pilots of our health
  6. The ivory tower is no more
  7. Measuring any vital signs at home
  8. Patient will be the king
  9. IT is going to be intuitive
  10. It only depends on us!

The Medical Futurist: Weekly Introduction

Working as a speaker and consultant with medical technology, pharmaceutical and web companies; as well as universities and governments worldwide, my mission as The Medical Futurist is to make sure the advances of technology lead to a better healthcare for everyone!

I publish a daily newsletter about the future of medicine, manage a popular Facebook page about the future; launched a Youtube channel and share related news almost every hour on Twitter.

Here is my new book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine:

KONYVBORITO_online final s 350

I’m also the author of Social Media in Clinical Practice handbookand the founder of Webicina.com, a service that curates medical content in social media for medical professionals and e-patients.

I launched The Social MEDia Course, the e-learning format of my university course focusing on medicine and social media for medical students, physicians and also patients with Prezis, tests and gamification.

I hope you will enjoy reading Scienceroll.com!

AliveCor Launches Updated App : The New Heart Journal

I’ve been using AliveCor to measure ECG on my smartphone for years. I’ve seen its evolution from the very early device to the one of today. It’s good to see they just released an updated application which can serve as a heart journal.

AliveCor, Inc., the leader in FDA-cleared ECG technology for smartphones, announced today the launch of the latest version of its AliveECG app. The new version of the AliveECG App includes The Heart Journal, a feature that allows users to log and tag daily activities, symptoms and events in real-time that can impact heart health and work to identify abnormalities. It also introduces a new metric called Beat Fluctuation, a measure of how much the heartbeat changes from beat to beat in ECG (or EKG) recordings.

These new features help users to not only learn more about their own heart health, but also contribute valuable data to the global understanding of heart arrhythmias. Currently thousands of patients a month are creating more than 40,000 different tags after they record an ECG. With the new Heart Journal users can now document their lifestyle factors anytime – with or without an ECG recording.

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