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Posts from the ‘Medicine’ Category

Top 5 Wearable Trackers And Handheld Devices Measuring How And What You Eat

For years, I’ve been measuring plenty of health parameters and vital signs about myself to make sure I truly live a healthly life but tracking what I eat and my eating habits has been a real problem. Although, I have been using a few trackers and have had a chance to try or see some other devices which will revolutionize the way we eat every day. Let’s see the top 5 wearable trackers and handheld devices.

1) Liftware: Designed by Lift Labs which was acquired by Google, Liftware is a stabilizing handle and a selection of attachments that include a soup spoon, everyday spoon, and fork. Liftware is specially designed to improve the lives of those with Essential Tremor, Parkinson’s Disease, or other motion disorders.

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2) HAPI fork: Eating too fast leads to poor digestion and poor weight control. The HAPIfork, powered by Slow Control, is an electronic fork that helps you monitor and track your eating habits. It also alerts you with the help of indicator lights and gentle vibrations when you are eating too fast.

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3) Tellspec: The world’s first handheld device able to scan food so consumers know more about the ingredients before they buy or eat the food. TellSpec brings together spectroscopy and a unique mathematical algorithm in a revolutionary system that can analyze the chemical composition of foods.

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4) BitBite: BitBite is a wearable device meant to track, analyze and change the way you eat. When you slow down, chew more and eat at regular intervals you’ll be improving your nutrition, feel better and shed those extra pounds.

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5) Automatic Ingestion Monitor: Known as the Automatic Ingestion Monitor (AIM), the 3D-printed prototype device is worn over one ear. Among other things, it incorporates a motion sensor, a tiny camera, and a Bluetooth transmitter. When the user eats, the sensor detects the distinctive chewing motion of their jaw – it’s able to tell the difference between that motion, and those that accompany activities such as talking. Once AIM is triggered by the chewing, its camera takes photos of what the user is eating.

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See how some of these work in action and how they could be used to improve eating habits in the newest video of The Medical Futurist Youtube channel. And please let me know if you know about other devices.

The Medical Futurist: Weekly Introduction

Working as a speaker and consultant with medical technology, pharmaceutical and web companies; as well as universities and governments worldwide, my mission as The Medical Futurist is to make sure the advances of technology lead to a better healthcare for everyone!

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I publish a daily newsletter about the future of medicine, manage a popular Facebook page about the future; launched a Youtube channel and share related news almost every hour on Twitter.

Here is my new book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine:

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I’m also the author of Social Media in Clinical Practice handbookand the founder of Webicina.com, a service that curates medical content in social media for medical professionals and e-patients.

I launched The Social MEDia Course, the e-learning format of my university course focusing on medicine and social media for medical students, physicians and also patients with Prezis, tests and gamification.

I hope you will enjoy reading Scienceroll.com!

Fitness Band Named Best Christmas Gift in Sweden

The Trade Union, an interest organisation for retail trade, in Sweden named fitness activity trackers the Christmas Gift of the year. Isn’t it a good sign of health management becoming trendy?

Fitness armbands are set to be this year’s hottest Christmas gift, according to Swedish retail researchers HUI Research. The device was unveiled by HUI as 2014’s Christmas Present of the Year (Årets julklapp) on Tuesday. The company expects them to be a big seller in the lead up to Christmas. “The health trend is going strong; it’s trendy to be active,” said Lena Larsson, CEO at HUI Research. “Fitness armbands encourage daily exercise and are a lifestyle product for tech-savvy fitness enthusiasts.”

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Win a Copy of My New Book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine!

There is a giveaway contest on Goodreads.com open until the 12th of December. If you enter with one click, you can become one of the 10 winners who will receive a paperback copy of my recently released book.

Good luck!

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Organovo Will Soon 3D Bioprint Organs

Organovo is in the forefront of innovation when it comes to 3D printing biomaterials. A few weeks ago, they announced they can print out liver tissue to be used for pharmaceutical analyses. It might lead to an era when animal testing will not be necessary.

Now they announced a partnership with Yale about further developing this idea of bioprinting tissues and later organs.

CEO of Organovo, Keith Murphy, said of the partnership, “Developing organs for surgical implantation will take meaningful efforts and focused partnerships. This collaboration with Yale, which combines their expertise and technology with our own, is one important step in progressing towards implantable, therapeutic tissues. We are grateful to the Methuselah Foundation for their generous gift that gives those working towards significant breakthroughs in organ bioprinting an opportunity to use the NovoGen bioprinter and enable greater access to Organovo’s powerful platform.”

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Here is how the process works:

Start Measuring Your Sleep Quality at Home!

I’m sure a lot of people hate their jobs and others just because they always have a bad sleep.Today’s news are full of scary facts and side effects from missing sleep. It’s time to improve that.

I’ve been measuring my sleep quality for over a year and now I sleep less but still wake up in a more energized way. How? With wearable trackers.

I use Withings Pulse once a week on my wrist at night to measure my sleep quality. How long deep sleep periods I have and how much time it takes to go asleep. Then I use the Morpheuz app on the Pebble smartwatch that wakes me up at the best time when I’m not in deep sleep any more. Jackpot.

This is the topic I cover in my new video on the Medical Futurist Youtube channel.

IBM Watson is the Stethoscope of the 21st Century

In 2011, people witnessed an interesting competition on the television quiz show Jeopardy. It featured the two best players in the history of the show, Ken Jennings, who had the longest unbeaten run of 74 winning appearances, and Brad Rutter, who had earned the biggest prize of $3.25 million. Their opponent was a huge computer with over 750 servers and a cooling system stored at a location so as not to disturb the players. The room–sized machine was made by IBM and named after the company’s founder, Thomas J. Watson. It did not smile or show emotion, but it kept on giving good answers. At the end, Watson won the game with $77,147 leaving Rutter and Jennings with $21,600 and $24,000 respectively.

Cognitive computers have been developing rapidly over the last few years following three technological breakthroughs. One is cheap parallel computation due to a new kind of chip called a graphics processing unit (GPU). The second one is accessible big data due to massive databases, web cookies, wearable devices and decades of search results. The third one is building better algorithms due to the services of Netflix, Google, Amazon and the others.

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From Stethoscope to Cognitization

People, especially in medicine, do not like change. Moreover, after many of my talks, physician colleagues ask me whether artificial intelligence (AI) might replace them in their jobs and whether algorithms can eventually become better at making diagnoses. Both will happen but the job of physicians will transform into a new role because of that. They finally have more time to deal with patients instead of chasing the information they would need. They will get access to that immediately. Cognitive computers will help physicians diagnose the same way stethoscope could change the medical profession from the early 19th century when René Laennec developed a wooden tube that worked like an ear trumpet to listen to cardiac and lung sounds.

The use of AI does not have to lead to the loss of the human touch. In 1997, IBM’s supercomputer Deep Blue could beat Garry Kasparov, the reigning chess grand master that time. He said he could have performed better if he had access to the same databases as Deep Blue. So later, freestyle matches were organized in which supercomputers could play against human chess players assisted by AI (they were called human/AI centaurs). Guess what! In 2014 in a Freestyle Battle, the AI chess players won 42 games, but centaurs won 53 games. The best potential pair is a human with technology. This is the only balance that can lead to a positive future with more and more disruptive innovations including ever-improving cognitive computing but an also ever-improving human intelligence and wisdom. This is the winning combination.

If AI can improve a chess player, it can improve a physician as well.

What even the most acclaimed professors know cannot match cognitive computers. As the amount of information they accumulate grows exponentially, the assistance of computing solutions in medical decisions is imminent. While a physician can keep a few dozen study results and papers in mind, IBM’s Watson can process millions of pages in seconds. This remarkable speed has led to trying Watson in oncology centers to see how helpful it is in making treatment decisions in cancer care. We need to prepare for its use but IBM has taken the first steps. Watson does not answer medical questions, but based on data it comes up with the most relevant and likely outcomes. Physicians make the final call. Computer assistance can only facilitate the work of physicians, not replace it. Just like how stethoscope did.

Read more stories about how artificial intelligence can impact medical decision-making in the new book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine.

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