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Posts from the ‘Mobile’ Category

Social Media in Clinical Practice: Chapter 11, Medical Smartphone and Tablet Applications

When I realized Springer made the individual chapters of my book, Social Media in Clinical Practice, available, I thought it would be useful for future readers to get some insights about each chapter one by one.

Here is the short summary of what you can read about and an excerpt of the eleventh chapter, Medical Smartphone and Tablet Applications:

There are approximately four billion mobile phones in the world, out of which 1.08 billion are smartphones. It is estimated that mobile Internet should take over desktop Internet usage by 2014. In 2012, 31 % of cell phone users used their phone to look for health information in the US, while this number was 17 % in 2010.Examples of Using Second Life in Medicine

  • Main Differences Among Mobile Operating Systems
  • Resources and databases of medical smartphone applications
  • Medical Smartphone Applications
  • Features to be checked before choosing a smartphone application
  • Smartphone Apps for Consumers
  • Smartphone Apps for Medical Professionals
  • Tablets in Medicine
  • Potential Uses of Mobile Technology in Healthcare

978-1-4471-4305-5

Chapters that have already been covered:

Geotagging-Based Augmented Reality: ARYS

I just came across a startup competing in the Global Startup Battle that produced a nice application backed by a great idea in just 54 hours. I’m supporting ARYS in the competition.

ARYS is a smartphone app that features the possibility to add photos, music, text and video to a place as a geotag and share it with the public, so later on anyone can see it when they pass by using the ARYS app. ARYS is a revolutionary application that lets you leave your MARK in the city so others can see it later. With the help of ARYS you can leave a AR message very easy for the public or a friend at a certain spot in the city.

We will see similar techniques soon in the OR as well. Here is how Go Pro cameras and Google Glass can be used in medical training.

The Guide to the Future of Medicine: Download the White Paper with Infographic

Being a medical futurist means I work on bringing disruptive technologies to medicine & healthcare; assisting medical professionals and students in using these in an efficient and secure way; and educating e-patients about how to become equal partners with their caregivers.

Based on what we see in other industries, this is going to be an exploding series of changes and while redesigning healthcare takes a lot of time and efforts, the best we can do is to prepare all stakeholders for what is coming next. That was the reason behind creating The Guide to the Future of Medicine white paper which you can download for free.

Future_cover_valasztott

Please use the Twitter hashtag #MedicalFuture for giving feedback.

In the white paper, there is an infographic featuring the main trends that shape the future of medicine visualized from 3 perspectives:

  1. Which stage of the delivery of healthcare and the practice of medicine is affected by that (Prevent & Prepare; Data Input & Diagnostics; Therapy & Follow-up; and Outcomes & Consequences);
  2. Whether it affects patients or healthcare professionals;
  3. The practicability of it (already available – green boxes; in progress – orange boxes; and still needs time – red boxes)

Click here to see the infographic in the original size.

Guide to the Future of Medicine Infographic

I hope you will find the guide useful in your work or in preparing your company and colleagues for the future of medicine.

Mobile Medical Applications: FDA Guidance is Out!

The FDA finally issued a guidance for industry and FDA staff about mobile medical applications. I think they meant medical mobile applications, but still. The point is they are moving forward. Here is the PDF.

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Your Cardiac Rhythm as a Password for Computer Access

The new technology developed by Nymi was just announced and will certainly raise important questions about security. This is a bracelet using ECG authentication serving as a password to access computers or open doors.

The benefit of the Nymi’s new and exciting ECG authentication is that it is highly secure without compromising convenience. The Nymi has a 3-Factor system ensures that you and only you have access to your Nymi, and control of your identity. To access the Nymi you must first have possession of the wristband. Second, you must possess your unique heart rhythm, and finally, you must have access to the secure application on a registered smartphone. Once you’ve authenticated, you will remain authenticated so long as the wristband is not removed.

While the idea is great, what about people with different forms of arrhythmia? What about ECG results available in medical records of almost everyone? I hope the team behind Nymi will give us the responses.

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The Samsung SmartWatch to Replace Medical Pagers?

The new Samsung Galaxy Gear Smartwatch was just presented and based on its features it has the potential to replace medical pagers while smartphones could not make this step.

  • Obviously, it works like a watch.
  • It can record videos.
  • Play music.
  • Has a pedometer
  • Make phone calls
  • Has its own applications
  • Weather, taking notes, sending messages and many more.

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Augmented Reality in Operating Rooms Soon!

A clinic in Germany started experimenting with an application using augmented reality on iPads in the OR. During operations, surgeons can see through anatomical structures such as blood vessels in the liver without opening organs therefore they can perform more precise excisions.

A CT scan is performed before the surgery and the imaged vessels are identified within software, all of which is then transferred to the iPad. During the procedure the surgeon can navigate the imaged liver to see where the vessels are, and if the camera is turned on and pointed at the exposed liver the app automatically superimposes the vessel structure of the organ onto the live picture. Notably, the app is not simply a concept, but was already tested successfully during a liver tumor removal at Asklepios Klinik Barmbek in Hamburg.

fraunhofer-MEVIS

Years ago, I wrote about an experiment of similar kind performed at the Computer Assisted Medical Procedures Institute at the Technische Universitat München.

The technology is now there, we just have to put evidence behind using it in practice. Exciting times ahead!

 

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