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Posts from the ‘Technology’ Category

Withings launches #NoMoreSnooze and Aura: Interview

Withings launched the #NoMoreSnooze campaign to encourage people to not hit the snooze button, as well as their sleep tracker Aura which not only helps improve sleep but how we wake up. I did a quick interview with the founders to find out how it actually works. I wrote about how and why I use Withings Pulse before.

How do Pulse and Aura compare regarding the quality of measuring sleep?
Pulse measures sleep only based on the users movements. The Aura measures sleep based on movement and vital signs (heart rate & breathing), therefore it allows the user to track more in depth sleep cycles including REM (rapid eye movement) sleep when the user is completely motionless except for their breathing. Understanding the user’s sleep cycles is why the Aura is called the smart sleep system and uses data from the sleep sensor to wake up the user at the lightest time in their sleep cycle.

Isn’t the ultimate goal of wearables to make them smaller and smaller?
The Aura is not a wearable, in fact it is better than a wearable because it allows for a completely discrete experience for the user. Once the sleep sensor is placed under the user’s mattress, they never have to worry about it again and it automatically starts tracking sleep without having to touch any buttons. Along with the bedside device, the user never has to think about tracking because they will just automatically receive their sleep data on their smartphone every morning.

So far, I have been setting the Morpheuz app on my Pebble smartwatch to wake me up at the best potential time based on the measurements of Pulse. How would Aura change this habit of mine?
Aura uses scientifically proven light and sound program to drastically improve the user’s wake-up experience. It is not only the data from the sleep sensor but also that it connects to the bedside device to slowly wake up the user in their lightest sleep cycle with soothing rhythm based on their breathing rate and emitting the appropriate wavelengths of light to slowly inhibit the secretion of melatonin (the hormone responsible for our sleep-wake cycle) to wake up the user peacefully ensuring the best overall sleep quality.  

Let me know what experience you had after using Aura!

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The Future of Medicine in One Word Cloud

My book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, will become available on Amazon.com in black&white paperback, colored paperback and Kindle formats on the 2nd of September. After sharing an excerpt of the table of contents revealing what trends are featured in the book; here is a word cloud presenting the main concepts and companies that are also described in details through stories, interviews and a lot of pictures.

What would be your top 3 choices among these to read more about?

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The Most Connected Man: Video

There is an amazing article about Chris Dancy, who I also interviewed for my upcoming book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, and who is considered the most connected man. Sometimes, I heard people commenting on his story/journey saying that he is focusing on technology too much and his case should not be an example for others.

Although I think he made it clear in this article why he is using a lot of wearables and sensors to make his life better.

“I’m the most connected man in the world to myself,” he says. “I’m not the most connected man in the world to technology. Technology was the route.”

AliveCor Receives FDA Clearance to Detect Atrial Fibrillation

I’ve been using AliveCor for over a year now and I think this is the best device for measuring 1-channel ECG. I’ve been saying that it should soon be available for use for patients as well. See their recent press release for the great news.

AliveCor, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted the company clearance for its algorithm to detect atrial fibrillation (AFib), the most common form of cardiac arrhythmia. AliveCor’s automated analysis process (algorithm) instantly detects if patients are experiencing AFib through real-time electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings taken on the mobile phone based AliveCor® Heart Monitor, so physicians can intervene before potentially life-threatening conditions, like strokes, occur. Through AliveCor’s ECG analysis service, patients can confirm their results with a U.S. board-certified cardiologist or a personal physician.

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The Guide to the Future of Medicine: Let’s Prepare For The Future!

We are facing major changes as medicine and healthcare now produce more developments than in any other era. Key announcements in technology happen several times a year, showcasing gadgets that can revolutionize our lives and our work. Only five or six years ago it would have been hard to imagine today’s ever increasing billions of social media users; smartphone and tablet medical applications; the augmented world visible through Google Glass; IBM’s supercomputer Watson used in medical decision making; exoskeletons that allow paralyzed people to walk again; or printing out medical equipment and biomaterials in three dimensions.

Medical Doctor holding a world globe in her hands as medical network concept

 

It would have sounded like science fiction. Sooner or later such announcements will go from multiple times a year to several times a month, making it hard to stay informed about the most recent developments. This is the challenge facing all of us.

Based on my white paper and CNN article, I decided to demonstrate where the world of medicine is heading in a a book which will come out late August. The Guide to the Future of Medicine will feature 22 trends and technologies that will shape the future.

My mission with the book is to prove that the relation between the human touch in medicine and using disruptive innovations is mutual. By losing the quintessence of practicing medicine, the real-life doctor-patient relationship, we would lose everything. Although without implementing innovative technologies, it is becoming more and more complicated (if not impossible) to provide proper care.

Therefore this new world requires preparation and new skills must also be acquired. I wrote this book to fulfill this mission. 

Here are some of the topics you will be able to read about soon everywhere online before the book comes out.

  • Health Sensors In and Outside The Body
  • DIY Biotechnology
  • Advanced Robotics
  • Artificial Intelligence in Medical Decision Support
  • Hospitals of the Future
  • Nanotechnology
  • The 3D Printing Revolution
  • The Rise of Recreational Cyborgs
  • and many more!

Let’s prepare for the amazing yet uncertain future of medicine together! #medicalfuture

 

Why Predicting The Future Is Not Possible Without Knowing Today’s Trends

Minsuk Cho, South Korean architect, curates an “epic-scale show about both Koreas” at this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale. One of the most exciting projects they present there is the result of how architects of North Korea designed the future of houses and cities without actually ever leaving the country or studying about other city design in details.

Look what kind of futuristic concepts they came up with while, for instance, keeping the old types of phones alive, not really moving forward with the advances of technology.

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It clearly shows how important it is to stay up-to-date about how technology is advancing today in order to be able to make informed decisions and assumptions about the future.

This is why I launched a Facebook page under the name The Medical Futurist to curate and publish news, reports and analyses about the most important trends and technologies that will shape the future of medicine. Feel free to join the discussion there!

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Reinventing The Medical Curriculum

Medical curriculum worldwide cannot meet the needs of today’s e-patients and technologies any more, therefore there is time for a substantial change. Good examples are sporadic but at least exist. At Monash University, they developed a kit of 3D-printed anatomical body parts to revolutionize medical education and training. I studied anatomy when I was a medical student from books with tiny font sizes and old atlases. Here is how it can be a different experience.

The 3D Printed Anatomy Series kit, to go on sale later this year, could have particular impact in developing countries where cadavers aren’t readily available, or are prohibited for cultural or religious reasons. After scanning real anatomical specimens with either a CT or surface laser scanner, the body parts are 3D printed either in a plaster-like powder or in plastic, resulting in high resolution, accurate color reproductions.

 

3d-printed-anatomy-series

 

Moreover, in the Netherlands, a 3D bioprinting Masters program was just introduced and now they plan to become a global centre of bioprinting. This is how medical schools and institutions worldwide should aim at adopting new technologies. This is what the main organizer said:

“There will be 120 researchers completely dedicated to regenerative medicine and biofabrication. Our main work within the bioprinting facility in the early stages is on cartilage and underlying bones. For this type of biological structures, bioprinting technologies are mature and the development of bioinks is taking off exponentially. Our goal is to create a hub of knowledge focused on Utrecht while reaching out to the international scientific community.”

If we don’t change curriculum worldwide, it will be late to prepare today’s students for tomorrow’s world.

 

 

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