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Posts from the ‘Video’ Category

Virtual Reality Will Change The Healthcare Experience

Virtual Reality or VR is a computer-simulated environment in which we can have the feeling as being in a digital, virtual world experiencing smell, sound, taste, and visuals. VR has been mentioned in many sci-fi masterpieces such as the Necromancer by Gibson, but technology behind that only came to a point where it can become reality now. Therefore I decided to describe some medical implications of virtual reality in the newest video of The Medical Futurist Youtube Channel.

I recently started discovering the options of virtual reality with the Google Cardboard. Putting my own smartphone with the right application into a cardboard can give the feeling of being in a virtual world. My favorite apps so far are Roller Coaster VRCmoar Roller Coaster VR, and Solar System VR. I should start filming the first reaction of people who give it a try.

Google-Cardboard-2-640x360

Cardboard is just the very first step. Devices such as Oculus Rift acquired by Facebook, Sony’s Morpheus or Magic Leap will make the difference in the coming years. Check how Magic Leap could change the world around ourselves. Let’s see how virtual reality could change the healthcare experience with ever-improving technologies.

  • Imagine that we could use virtual reality for training surgeons. They could be inside the human body based on the patient’s radiology images discovering all the options before opening up the patient during an operation.
  • We could use virtual reality for patients to experience the hospital feeling even before going to the hospital. They could see how a procedure takes place, how much time it takes, what’s going to happen to them by getting a treatment or procedure.
  • We could use that for psychology treatments, for people with addictions to show them different kinds of worlds. One with being addicted to something, and one with not being addicted any more showing them the real differences in life and how it could change if they found a solution for that addiction. The same is used in PTSD or fighting phobias.
  • Imagine that we could use it for stress relief letting people travel to countries around the world and experiencing the real world through virtual reality.
  • We could train people for emergency and disaster situations without risking anybody’s life.
  • Virtual rehabilitation performed at the patient’s home for anxieties, attention deficits or amnesia. The list of conditions in which VR could be helpful is incredibly long.
  • 360 immersive Virtual Reality arrived to the Cathlab chaning Medical Education.
  • If there is no available real cadaver to practice surgery on, VR can help.
  • A new way for motivating people for doing exercises could be merging VR with video games. See this video:

When for the first time I showed Google Cardboard to my 7 years old niece and she checked that out, she asked me, why would people want real-life experience any more when they can have this. So we will face really serious ethical questions in the coming years, but again virtual reality with the devices coming to the market very soon has the potentials to change the whole healthcare experience.

Read more about the future of virtual reality in my new book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine!

The Guide to the Future of Medicine ebook cover

9 Ways Technology Helps Manage Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease

With all these technological advances, improvements and new devices coming to the market, we could significantly improve the lives of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease patients. They could change the way they eat or they orientate, how they gather information. We could improve their lives all together. In the newest video of The Medical Futurist Youtube channel, I describe 9 examples.

Lift Labs designs a spoon that can cancel the tremor for Parkinson’s disease patients while they are having their meal.

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The Wright Stuff offers a range of products that makes getting dressed easier for anyone who has lost the use of one of their hands. The company has Dressing Sticks, one-handed belt, sock aids, they even one-handed nail clippers for people.

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Wearable cameras and augmented reality glasses could help patients with Alzheimer’s disease. These gadgets can snap hundreds of photos every day from their user’s perspective logging their lives this way.

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Tablet-based applications such as Speak For Yourself put vocabularies of 13,000 words within a few touches on a screen. Plus, as the sound quality is improving, the voice becomes more and more natural.

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MC10 develops a Biostamp that is thinner than a band-aid, and it has the size of just two postage stamps. It can be attached to any part of the body and the sensors monitor temperature, movements, heart rate, all these vital signs which can be transmitted wirelessly to an application, for example.

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Even little ideas matter. A German senior center implemented the idea of using fake bus stops to prevent Alzheimer’s disease patients from wandering off. Because their short term memory is not intact, but while the long term memory works fine, therefore they know what the sign means and they stop. It is a huge success in Germany, now they want to bring it to several clinics.

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Devices could be used for fall prevention to make sure when a patient falls down or there is an emergency situation, this sign could be transmitted wirelessly to the local clinic or hospital.

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A company called Ybrain has built a wearable device based on neuroscience technology to specifically target brain regions using electrical signals that aim to reduce the symptoms of degenerative brain diseases like Alzheimer’s disease.

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A company called GTX Corp developed a smart shoe with which patients can find the way home and they can orientate quite easily while walking around the street.

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It’s time to significantly improve the lives of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease patients. If you know about other examples, technological solutions or gadgets, please share those!

Read more about the future of disease management in my recent book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine!

The Guide to the Future of Medicine ebook cover

Tips to Make Your Digital Life Efficient (Video)

In the newest video of The Medical Futurist Youtube channel, I talk about how I rewired my social media profiles and my whole online presence to make digital life as efficient as possible. Using e-mails, Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and more!

See more videos here.

5 Ways to Prepare The Doctors of The Future

Years ago when I was a medical student I felt that lexical knowledge was more important than actually being able to find the information I need. And now there are 23 million peer-reviewed papers on Pubmed.com so the skill of being able to find information is becoming even more important than ever.

I thought that medical curriculum should be redesigned in a way that now we can serve this new need for skills such as digital literacy. That is why I launched the world’s first university course focusing on social media, mobile health and the future of medicine. The course is still running with full house.

In my new video, I described methods that help us prepare students for becoming physicians who can take care of their patients in a technological world. Here is the video and then summaries of the 5 methods.

Developing e-learning platforms

I launched an e-learning platform for my students on which they can check all the presentations with hand-outs, data, studies, plus they can do the tests online. If they complete the tests online, they can skip the written exam.

The Social MEDia Course

The Social MEDia Course

Engaging students through social media

As all my medical students have Facebook accounts; challenges, tasks about online activities and questions about the topics covered during the lectures are posted every day during the semester on the Facebook page of the course and students with the most bonus points do not have to take the written exam. They fight against each other.

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Gamification

The typical curriculum requires students to study texts and data by heart without proper reasoning and understanding the logic behind it. Instead, study through serious diagnostic games has clear advantages. The “Healing Blade” card game takes the player into a world of sorcery and creatures where real–world knowledge of infectious diseases and therapeutics play a pivotal role in the winning strategy. “Occam’s Razor” is a real diagnostic card game released by NerdCore Medical.

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Creating a digital environment

I offer students the chance to interact with each other outside the curriculum online. If they need help in using a social media channel, they can find me online and I’m happy to help. With some of them, I’m still in touch even years after they completed my course. This way they can learn the tricks of online collaboration and it might be a simpler task when they have to do it as a part of their everyday job.

Rethinking the whole curriculum

At Radboud University Medical Center, they are currently working on a revolutionary new medical curriculum. The educational vision behind this transformation has been inspired by people all over the world who want to improve people’s lives through healthcare and education. In this system, each student has a personal coach. They work with a so–called open space technology in which students themselves decide what will be addressed when students and teachers meet. Currently, biomedical and medical students also work as consultants for pharmaceutical companies in an attempt to come up with innovative ideas. These young students still have a lot to learn, but it seems they learn very quickly when under pressure.

Please share what you think either as a student or a lecturer and read more about the future of medical education in my recent book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine!

The Guide to the Future of Medicine ebook cover

Which Wearable Device to Choose? (Video)

As a geek, let me tell you it’s quite simple to fall in love with a gadget or device at first sight. Although the way we try to stay healthy should not be controlled by technology or gadgets but by being proactive in our own health.

As many subscribers asked me about how I choose my own wearable devices for tracking health, I thought I would share the quality features I take a look at first so then you can make an informed decision when purchasing a wearable tracker.

A few things I check:

  • Company behind the device
  • App is updated regularly
  • User reviews
  • Money-back guarantee
  • What do I want to measure
  • How to access data
  • How to export data
  • Is it compatible with my smartphone

Read more about health wearables in The Guide to the Future of Medicine.

Ethical Issues of The Future of Medicine: The Top 10

While I was writing my book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, I was constantly thinking about all the ethical issues disruptive technologies will make us face in the coming years. I’m a born optimist and if you look at recent developments in medicine & healthcare, you realize optimism can now be based on facts. Although, without being prepared for the coming waves of change, physicians, patients and all stakeholders will only come across threats, ethical issues and serious problems when they try to implement technology into everyday care.

I remain confident that we are still in time and we can still prepare for the amazing yet uncertain future of medicine. What is definitely needed, among others things such as new skills, is initiating public discussions now. It was my intention when I made a list of 10 potential ethical issues we will all have to deal with soon.

1) Hacking medical devices

It has already been proven that pacemakers and insulin pumps can be hacked. Security experts have warned us that someone would be murdered through these methods any time soon. How can we prevent wearable devices that are connected to our physiological system from being hacked and controlled from a distance?

2) Defending our privacy

We share much more information about ourselves now than we think. Check mypermissions.org to see what services and apps you have given permission to access your personal information already. What if we start using augmented reality contact lenses and get information about people immediately? Kids being born these years represent the first generation of which every life detail is getting logged. While such big data could significantly improve healthcare, how to prevent companies and governments from using these?

3) Scanning ourselves at home

Now physicians are worried because patients do Google their symptoms and treatments and they might take the misinformation they find there to the caregiver. What will be doctors worried about when patients scan themselves, do a blood test and even genetic analysis at home? Will we able to persuade such patients to turn to doctors and not only trust algorithms? If you think that is still science fiction, check the finalist of the Nokia Sensing XChallenge.

4) Healthy people switching to technology

Matthew James was born with dysmelia, a congenital disorder causing deformed limbs. James wrote to his favorite Formula One team, Mercedes, at age 14 that he was ready to display their logo on his prosthesis if they could support him financially. He received £30,000 but was not taken up on his offer of advertising space. This story shows that the implementation of such innovations in the everyday lives cannot depend purely on individual entrepreneurship. As a consequence, what if people start asking their doctors to replace their healthy limbs for robotic ones?

Prosthetic arm

5) Biological differences

Today, societies struggle to fight gender and financial inequality. But from the time technology can truly augment human capabilities, people will get smarter, healthier and faster only by being able to afford them. How do we prepare society for a time when financial differences lead to biological ones?

6) How society changes if we can prolong life

Longevity studies have been going on for decades. Several aspects about the ultimate secrets of long life have been discovered, but we haven’t really got closer to significantly prolong life. Sooner or later, we will. What happens with the basics of society if the majority of us start living for more than 100 years? How can we make sure that ageing doesn’t necessarily get associated with severe decline in health?

7) Bioterrorism due to nanotechnology

In the wildest futuristic scenarios, tiny nanorobots in our bloodstream could detect diseases. After a few decades they might even eradicate the word symptom inasmuch as no one would have them any longer. These microscopic robots would send alerts to our smartphones or digital contact lenses before disease could develop in our body. If it becomes reality, and microrobots swimming in bodily fluids are already out there, how can we prevent terrorists from trying to hack these devices controlling not only our health but our lives?

bigstock-Nanobots-7414004

8) Technological developments vs. evidence based medicine

Over the last few years, technological advances have become so fast, it’s really hard to keep track of them any more. In the meantime, evidence based medicine shapes how we deliver healthcare. The latter is a fundamentally long process. Certain solutions such as simulations with cognitive computers might make them faster but these could never be as fast as technological developments. When patients start seeing the amazing innovations out there not being accessible to them in the everyday care, how will it transform the basic ways of practicing medicine?

9) Transhumanism & Singularitarianism

There are movements and philosophies that highlight one concept or approach even though it is highly unlikely that one solution will lead to a prosperous future. A network of interconnected people, devices, and concepts is intended to solve global issues. It is advisable not to trust just one movement or philosophy such as transhumanism or singularitarians. The most plausible solution will be a mix of all the concepts trying to describe the coming decades. We should be skeptical and analytical before accepting major philosophies about the future. In the history of mankind the number of new philosophies has never increased as fast as it is doing now. But it has never been easier to learn more about them.

10) Sexuality becoming technological

A man named Davecat lives with his wife and mistress, both of whom are Synthetiks––specially designed, life–sized Dolls. Accordingly, Davecat calls himself a technosexual. While some will not understand how Davecat thinks about his partners, his story represents perfectly the diversity of concepts and theories that will arise in the next couple of years. How can we prepare for all these if we cannot even solve today’s issues in sexuality?

davecat_130907

What have I missed? Please leave a comment and start the discussion now!

Read more about the ethical issues of the future of medicine in my recent book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine!

The Guide to the Future of Medicine ebook cover

Boston Dynamics Showcases Their Robotic “Animal Park”

If you ever wonder where the developments of robotics are heading, check what Boston Dynamics has been working on:

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