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Posts from the ‘Web 2.0’ Category

5 Things I Learnt On The Way To 50,000 Twitter Followers

I started using Twitter in 2007 and have been publishing thoughts, content and news about digital health since then almost on an hourly basis. I don’t care about numbers but when you reach a milestone, it keeps you thinking about what you have learnt on the way. Here are the 5 things I learnt while building a network of over 50,000 followers.

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1) The slower, the better.

I could have followed tens of thousands of people irrelevant to my topics and gain a few more followers myself. But using Twitter has always meant being in the bloodstream of information and for this I chose to take it slow. It took me over 8 years to build my network and I’m glad I chose the wise way. I know many of those people in person or we have been in contact for years. It builds trust and leads to professional relationships.

2) There are no limits

I travel around the world almost constantly, but I’m based in Budapest. What I learnt is there are no physical or geographical limitations when millions of people are connected to each other. My network is mostly US-based but I can talk to any medical professional, patient or innovator who has something to say about forming the future of medicine.

3) We solve problems together

A lot of issues related to healthcare pop up in the stream of Twitter every day and we try to get the best people to think about the possible solutions. Through Twitter, I managed to crowdsource a complicated diagnosis, I get answers for very specific questions and make new contacts around the world.

4) People respond more easily

I talk with people by e-mail, Skype, LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and many more channels. In my experience, people tend to respond faster when approached on Twitter as they know the character limitation only lets them transmit the key part of the information without the garnish.

5) I get news on Twitter

Twitter is the best filter I have today to get the key news and announcements about digital health. Companies get in contact with me to test their products and wearable health trackers. Twitter sends me those tweets that received the biggest attention that day. If I still miss something, someone will send it to me personally.

Because of my Twitter network, I live in a limitless world full of opportunities and information.

Let’s tweet in touch!

20 Doctors You Should Be Following on Twitter

It’s always a pleasure to be included in such lists as I get to know others working in the field of digital health. Here is the full list and an excerpt:

Twitter can be the ideal platform for a physician to offer meaningful, relevant information to patients and colleagues. Getting started is the hardest part, but looking to others who have succeeded on Twitter can be a good way to draw inspiration. These 20 doctors are burning up their Twitter feeds and attracting massive followings—each in their unique way.

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Three Digital Services in Diabetes

When I wrote about why diabetes management is facing extraordinary times, I included digital services. I recently came across some new services I haven’t heard about and thought I would share them with you. Hopefully, patients managing diabetes will find them useful.

1) VoyageMD: It helps diabetes patients who need to travel. Created by Professor David Kerr, it provides the latest information on all aspects of travel and diabetes including reviews on places to stay; travel itineraries and checklists; travel product reviews and airport procedures.

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2) ExCarbs: It was designed to help people with diabetes using insulin to feel comfortable with taking up exercise.

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3) diasend: It is a standalone system for easy uploading of information from most glucose meters, insulin pumps, CGMs and mobile apps. It also users to choose to link to various activity tracker systems including Fitbit, Up by Jawbone, Nike+ FuelBand, Moves and Runkeeper.

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Please let me know if you come across others.

The Medical Futurist on Instagram

As 90% of the hundreds of millions of Instagram users are younger than 35, I made a decision. I think the message that technologies can improve the human touch should reach millennials as well.

So, check out the Medical Futurist on Instagram. Photos and images about future technologies and the amazing innovations I come across worldwide.

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Tips to Make Your Digital Life Efficient (Video)

In the newest video of The Medical Futurist Youtube channel, I talk about how I rewired my social media profiles and my whole online presence to make digital life as efficient as possible. Using e-mails, Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and more!

See more videos here.

10 Exemplary Social Media Healthcare Professional Mentors

It’s always an honor being included in lists with such amazing names from Kevin, MD to Larry Chu. An excerpt from the announcement:

What follows are just ten of the exemplary digital opinion leaders (DOLs) creating social media training resources that have been highly shared by other healthcare professionals in the past year. Do you agree with my selection? Please add your suggestions to this list, and I invite you to further enhance this resource through your own opinions and experience.

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Channelling the future in medical education: Infographic!

I launched two courses at Semmelweis Medical School in order to prepare students for the digital world. One is focusing on the medical use of social media, and the other is dedicated to disruptive technologies and how to find the human touch in the digital jungle. Therefore I was very excited when Ashfield, an international healthcare services organization, asked me to be the moderator of a global discussion on the future of education.

I had a chance to work with key opinion leaders of medical education and to engage in amazing discussions about the future needs of medical professionals.

Medical education must ­finally step up to meet the expectations of empowered patients, the needs of busy physicians, and the use of disruptive technologies. This forum was designed to facilitate this process.

See the detailed article about the results on Pharmaphorum, the announcement by Ashfield and the whole infographic. Here is my favorite part and an excerpt from the article of Ruth Herman:

The digital revolution has already led to major changes in channel preferences as mobile technologies, online networks and other innovations provide better ways for healthcare professionals to learn and obtain new information. These changes are likely to continue as the digital skills and sophistication of both patient and physician populations continue to grow. So how can the providers of this information stay ahead?

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