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Posts from the ‘Web 2.0’ Category

Social Media in Clinical Practice: Chapter 17, Conclusions

When I realized Springer made the individual chapters of my book, Social Media in Clinical Practice, available, I thought it would be useful for future readers to get some insights about each chapter one by one.

Here is the short summary of what you can read about and an excerpt of the last chapter, Conclusions:

Social media has been clearly changing the way medicine is practiced and healthcare is delivered. The rising number of e-patients also initiated new movements in this area. Medical professionals of the twenty-first century must be able to meet the special needs of these patients and use digital technologies in their work and communication properly.

  • New skills have to be acquired in the digital era
  • There are some basic principles to keep in mind while using the Internet as a medical professional
  • A summary of purposes social media platforms can be used for
  • Links and Further Reading

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Chapters that have already been covered:

The “Social Media in Medicine” Course At Semmelweis University Launches!

I’m always very excited when the new semester of the Social Media in Medicine university course launches at Semmelweis University. I’ll introduce medical students to the world of social media by showing them a lot of practical examples; as well as to the world full of technological advances they will face when they leave medical school.

9 weeks, 15 extended topics, two surveys, one exam, and a lot of Facebook challenges every single day.

This course is still unique worldwide and I created a digital format as well so not only medical students and professionals at Semmelweis University can acquire such digital skills. Feel free to use the #HCSMcourse hashtag when communicating about the course.

Here is the timeline:

February 20: Introduction to social media and medicine
February 27: Medical search engines and the Google story
March 6: Solutions for information pollution and Medical communities
March 20: The mysteries of medical blogging
March 27: Crowdsourcing on Twitter for medical purposes
April 10: The world of e-patients; The era of Youtube and mobile apps
April 24: Wikipedia: the power of masses; Collaboration online
May 8: Education 2.0; written test
May 15: The future of medicine and the internet; results of the surveys

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Social Media in Clinical Practice: Chapter 16, Social Bookmarking

When I realized Springer made the individual chapters of my book, Social Media in Clinical Practice, available, I thought it would be useful for future readers to get some insights about each chapter one by one.

Here is the short summary of what you can read about and an excerpt of the sixteenth chapter, Social Bookmarking:

Communication with patients and colleagues and being up-to-date in a field of interest can be time consuming and solutions saving time and effort are very much needed in the medical profession. It is also a common case that medical professionals have to work on different computers, laptops or mobile devices such as smartphones or tablets and synchronizing information is challenging.

  • The main features of social bookmarking websites and services
  • Examples of social bookmarking sites

978-1-4471-4305-5

Chapters that have already been covered:

Disruptive Technologies in Medicine: Preparing Medical Students For The Future!

I’m very excited to announce that this semester we launch a new course, “Disruptive Technologies in Medicine” with Professor Maria Judit Molnar MD, PhD, DSc, the scientific Vice Rector of Semmelweis University. Our plan is to prepare medical students for those future technologies they will face by the time they start actually practicing medicine. I want to persuade them that the relation between the human touch and technologies is AND instead of OR.

Here are the topics we will cover with experts.

  • How Exponential and Disruptive Technologies Shape The Future of Medicine
  • Personalized Medicine – Genomic Health
  • Point of Care Diagnostics
  • The Future of Medical Imaging
  • Social Media in Medicine
  • Harnessing Big Data in Healthcare
  • Biotechnology and Gene Therapy
  • Mobile Health and Telemedicine
  • Regenerative Medicine, Optogenetics and 3D Printing
  • Medical Robotics, Bionics, Virtual Reality, and Future of Medical Technologies

We are going to teach them offline and online at the same time with plenty of assignments and interesting projects such as collaboration with the students of the course of Kim Solez at University of Alberta.

Feel free to follow all the developments and announcements of the course on Facebook. All the seats are already taken by international students. This is going to be an amazing semester!

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Social Media in Clinical Practice: Chapter 15, E-mails and Privacy Concerns

When I realized Springer made the individual chapters of my book, Social Media in Clinical Practice, available, I thought it would be useful for future readers to get some insights about each chapter one by one.

Here is the short summary of what you can read about and an excerpt of the fifteenth chapter, E-mails and Privacy Concerns:

E-mail or electronic mail is a method of sending and receiving digital messages online. This is one of the most common forms of online communication and while patients usually send simple questions via e-mail to their doctors, it might contain sensitive information which could lead to legal consequences if medical professionals do not know about such potential issues and the ways to avoid these.

  • The most common topics in patients’ e-mails include
  • The potential advantages and disadvantages of using e-mails in the doctor-patient relationship
  • A typical e-mail consists of these elements
  • Suggestions About Dealing with E-mails
  • Privacy Concerns in Social Media

978-1-4471-4305-5

Chapters that have already been covered:

Torrent Site For Academics: Brilliant!

Researchers at the University of Massachusetts came up with a very simple but still brilliant idea of creating a torrent site for academics. They have community sites such as ResearchGATE and reference managers such as Mendeley, but this torrent site sharing even huge datasets could find its target audience quickly.

AcademicTorrents provides researchers with a reliable and decentralized platform to share their work with peers, as well as the rest of the world. The site currently indexes over 1.5 petabytes of data, including NASA’s map of Mars. 

AcademicTorrents allows researchers to upload datasets, articles and other research material. The site runs it own tracker and supports web-seeds as well, which guarantee that files are available at all times.

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Wikipedia and/vs Pharma Industry

A while ago, I published an open letter in which I asked pharmaceutical companies to name one of their employees who could make 100% transparent edits on Wikipedia entries related to their own products. Now John Mack, the Pharmaguy, posted some updates about new reports on the relation between Wikipedia and the pharma industry and he asked me what I think about it.

As I’ve been plenty of pharma companies since then assisting them in creating an efficient digital strategy, here is what I said:

“Since I announced my open letter for pharma companies, I’ve been in touch with several international pharmaceutical companies and while they all agreed my proposal was the perfect method for them about editing Wikipedia in a proper way, none of them seemed to be able to make the final required step for that. I’m still optimistic though as I know how much time it takes to run through such ideas in large companies.” – Bertalan Mesko, MD, Medical Futurist at medicalfuturist.com, @Berci

Pharma-Wikipedia

The Relation Between The Human Touch and Medical Technology: AND Instead of OR

I’ve been giving talks about the future of medicine for years and many times, part of the audience is worried about losing the human touch of practicing medicine by using more technologies. As a medical futurist, I want to make things clear here.

The relation between the human touch in medicine and disruptive innovations is and; instead of or as people tend to think. By losing the quintessence of practicing medicine, the real-life doctor-patient relationship, we would lose everything. Although without using innovative technologies, it is becoming more and more complicated (if not impossible) to provide proper care.

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When I was 10 years old, I volunteered in computer shops to learn the hardware part of PCs. That time a man kept on coming back to the shop as he was expecting a delivery of a brand new hard drive he ordered some weeks ago. It was a hard drive of 40 megabytes (yes, megabytes) and he told me he had no idea what he would do with so much space on his computer. After almost two decades we have over a zettabyte of information online. It is practically impossible to keep up with that without using proper technologies. Moreover, it doubles now every 12 months, and soon will double every 12 hours.

The real challenge here is finding a balance between these; and it’s easier than you would think. By preparing for what is coming regarding medical innovation for all stakeholders of healthcare, we get a chance to start working out the methods and solutions in time, therefore we can use more and more efficient and secure technologies in medicine without losing the human touch of the doctor-patient relationship.

This is the topic I cover in my new book which should be out in a few months’ time. Wish me luck!

 

 

Social Media in Clinical Practice: Chapter 14, Creating Presentations and Slideshows

When I realized Springer made the individual chapters of my book, Social Media in Clinical Practice, available, I thought it would be useful for future readers to get some insights about each chapter one by one.

Here is the short summary of what you can read about and an excerpt of the fourteenth chapter, Creating Presentations and Slideshows:

Interpreting and sharing research results and clinical findings became more important than ever as social media is changing the landscape of online communication. The common way of doing that is by giving presentations online and offline. As clinicians are overwhelmed and being up-to-date is more challenging than ever, giving clear and engaging presentation is demanding.

  • A series of suggestions and pieces of advice might help improve presentations skills and materials.
  • Avoiding Last Minute Surprises
  • Methods for Giving a Presentation
  • Tools and Platforms for Creating Presentations
  • Comparisons of presentation creator tools

    978-1-4471-4305-5

Chapters that have already been covered:

Daily News About The Future Of Medicine And Healthcare

After launching the daily “Medical Futurist Newsletter” which has now over 1000 subscribers, I’m happy to announce the new website of Medicalfuturist.com where several announcements and reports will be published daily to showcase what is truly important about the future trends in medicine and healthcare.

Feel free to share and spread the word about it. The best way to prepare for the future of medicine is to keep yourself up-to-date about key trends and developments.

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