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Posts from the ‘WolframAlpha’ Category

Interactive Main Page for WolframAlpha

You know how much I admire WolframAlpha and how often I use it for medical search queries. Now they have an amazing, interactive main page with a lot of medical examples including tooth #31, check it out.

Health 2.0 News: From Android Interfaces to Wikipedia Hard-Cover Editions

Welcome to the Imagine Medicine contest! We are looking for fascinating medical photography that… imagines medicine. Nothing is off the table: portraits, group shots, happy shots, tragic shots, clinical shots, photoshop illustrations, macro, micro, and anything in between. Can you imagine medicine, showcase it as art, and make us wonder?

Health 2.0 News: Reporting Adverse Events and Lady Gaga in Lab

Today the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced the launch of a new app for smartphones that will alert consumers to the latest recall information in one spot, allowing them to track and actually see recalled products.  This means that a consumer doesn’t have to navigate a difficult and cumbersome Web site, or number of Web sites, to get the latest consumer information.

But there is something else in the app that is extremely provocative.  The app also has a “report incident” function that allows for a consumer to submit a report about a product that might be unsafe.

Computing Worldwide Health Indicators on WolframAlpha

I’m a big fan of WolframAlpha as it saves me plenty of times and clicks each and every day because it knows what kind of information I’m trying to find. According to the official blog, they just added data on health indicators for more than 200 countries and territories. The sources are obviously the CDC and  the World Health Organization among others.

Data is also now available on specific types of health care personnel, such as physicians, nurses, and dentists, and Wolfram|Alpha can also compute per capita figures for each type of health professional. Check out the figures on midwives in South Africa or dentists in Iceland—or for a particularly interesting view, trying asking about doctors per capita in all countries.

Try comparing medical resources of Cuba and the USA, or contraceptive use in Chad and France. Regional overviews are possible, too: you can view maps and summaries of data on underweight children in Africa and DTP immunization around the world, for example.

Health 2.0 News: iFall and Marketing Hospitals

  • Stephen Wolfram: Computing a theory of everything

A team at Florida State University is developing software on Android phones to help detect falls and shorten the time it takes to alert emergency services. Unlike other fall-detection technology, this app adds fall detection capability to one of the most commonly-owned devices – your phone.

Wolfram|Alpha Knows Your DNA

I’ve written about Wolfram Alpha several times, I really like it and think it saves me plenty of time while searching online.

I use WolframAlpha because sometimes (if I know exactly what I want to find) it saves me plenty of time and clicks. If I want to calculate BMI, Google lists me several calculators. WolframAlpha calculates it itself. If I want to find information very fast about a clinical marker, Google gives me resources, WA gives me the best answer in one click. I also use it for ICD classification, as it’s more easily accessible than Wikipedia; for epidemiological data and other calculations.

To sum it up, I think WolframAlpha is for those who perfectly know what they want to find and want to save time and clicks. For other search queries, Google is still the best.

Just to show you how useful it is in genetics and molecular biology, here are a few examples:

Information on a gene:

Comparison between genes

SNP analysis

Chromosomes and many more. See this blog entry for more details.

Further reading:

Medical Test Data on Wolfram|Alpha

Scienceroll.com readers know well I’m an admirer of WolframAlpha:

I use WolframAlpha because sometimes (if I know exactly what I want to find) it saves me plenty of time and clicks. If I want to calculate BMI, Google lists me several calculators. WolframAlpha calculates it itself. If I want to find information very fast about a clinical marker, Google gives me resources, WA gives me the best answer in one click. I also use it for ICD classification, as it’s more easily accessible than Wikipedia; for epidemiological data and other calculations.

To sum it up, I think WolframAlpha is for those who perfectly know what they want to find and want to save time and clicks. For other search queries, Google is still the best.

Now the Wolfram Alpha Team released a guide about how this unique search engine can be used for analyzing medical test-related data.

You can fine-tune the results even more by adding additional personal attributes. For example, entering “cholesterol tests age 65” filters the general population distribution to return only values from individuals 60–70 years old.

By adding more filters such as smoking status, diabetic status, pregnancy status, and other individual characteristics, you can find out more about how your test results compare to other populations covered by NHANES.

WolframAlpha Community: Medicine and Health

I use WolframAlpha because sometimes (if I know exactly what I want to find) it saves me plenty of time and clicks. If I want to calculate BMI, Google lists me several calculators. WolframAlpha calculates it itself. If I want to find information very fast about a clinical marker, Google gives me resources, WA gives me the best answer in one click. I also use it for ICD classification, as it’s more easily accessible than Wikipedia; for epidemiological data and other calculations.

To sum it up, I think WolframAlpha is for those who perfectly know what they want to find and want to save time and clicks. For other search queries, Google is still the best.

Now WolframAlpha launches communities and forums.

wolframalpha community

Some medicine-related forums and interesting discussions:

Health & Fitness:

Medicine:

Life Sciences:

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