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Genentech and PatientsLikeMe Enter Research Collaboration

Having witnessed the development of the globally known patient portal, Patientslikeme, over the last few years, I was not surprised to see the news:

PatientsLikeMe announced today a five-year agreement with Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, to explore use of PatientsLikeMe’s global online patient network to develop innovative ways of researching patients’ real-world experience with disease and treatment. The agreement is the first broad research collaboration between PatientsLikeMe and a pharmaceutical company and provides PatientsLikeMe the opportunity to expand its patient network in oncology.

“We envision a world where patient experience drives the way diseases are measured and medical advances are made. Genentech’s leadership and commitment to this mission brings us closer to having patients at the true center of healthcare,” said PatientsLikeMe Co-founder and Chairman Jamie Heywood. “With Genentech we can now embark on a journey to bring together many stakeholders across healthcare and collaborate with patients in a new way.”

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Digital Contact Lens Will Let Us Turn The Page By Blinking

Google is working on a new digital, multi-sensor contact lens according to the US Patent & Trademark Office. It will work with Google Glass and other wearables, as well as Android smartphones, Google Now, smart televisions and other devices.

It will let its user turn the page of a book or proceed to the next song by blinking.

The ultimate goal is to insert a screen into the lens but this will take years to fulfill.

According to Google, a mechanism is provided for detecting blinking of an eye via multiple sensors on or within the contact lens (hereinafter referred to as multi-sensor contact lens). For example, a multi-sensor contact lens can be placed in one or both eyes of a user that can actively determine (or infer) blinking of the eye.

In a non-limiting example, multi-sensor contact lens monitors sensors on or within the multi-sensor contact lens at intervals that are less than an average or shortest length of time of an eye blink. It is to be appreciated that both eyes of a human user generally blink at the same time, and thus in various embodiments only one multi-sensor contact lens is needed to generate a command to a remote device.

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The Medical Futurist: Weekly Introduction

As a medical futurist, I work on bringing disruptive technologies to medicine & healthcare; assisting medical professionals and students in using these in an efficient and secure way; and educating e-patients about how to become equal partners with their caregivers.

I publish a daily newsletter about the future of medicine, and share related news almost every hour on Twitter. Scienceroll.com is updated on a regular basis about the future of healthcare with an emphasis on social media. Here is my white paper, The Guide to the Future of Medicine.

I’m the author of Social Media in Clinical Practice handbookand the founder of Webicina.com, a service that curates medical content in social media for medical professionals and e-patients.

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I launched The Social MEDia Course, the e.learning format of my university course focusing on medicine and social media for medical students, physicians and also patients with Prezis, tests and gamification.

My recent keynote at TEDxNijmegen:

I hope you will enjoy reading Scienceroll.com!

Is This The Superhuman Robot?

Are we getting closer to a really humanoid robot? Here is a new step:

My Article About The Future of Medicine in The Futurist Magazine!

It’s a huge pleasure to share my article, Rx Disruption: Technology Trends in Medicine and Health Care, that was just published in the Futurist magazine. It is also an important step in my journey as a medical futurist.

As online platforms and digital technologies rapidly emerge and change, we need partnerships between patients and health-care professionals, as well as a guide to prepare for the future technologies that will have to be implemented quickly in everyday practices and in the health management of patients. Based on what we see in other industries, this is going to be an exploding series of changes. While redesigning health care takes a lot of time and effort, the best we can do is to prepare all stakeholders for what is coming next.

The following overview of the major trends in health care offers guidance for preparing individuals, organizations, and medical practitioners for the health-care landscape ahead. This guide will be continuously updated, so reader feedback is welcome.

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TED Talk: What I learned from going blind in space

The famous astronaut, Chris Hadfield, had a great presentation at the recent TED conference. Enjoy!

The First Bionic Olympics To Be Held in 2016

After Pistorius competing at the last 2012 Olympic Games with prosthetics, we all knew that the world of sport was about to change dramatically. More and more athletes now utilize innovative technologies or actually wear them to augment human capabilities, therefore the announcement of the first Bionic Olympic Games called the Cybathlon to be held in Switzerland in 2016 did not come as a surprise.

The Cybathlon will award two categories of medals for each event: one for the athlete and one for the scientist or company that manufactured the robotic assistive device. That includes things like the latest prosthetics, exoskeletons, and powered wheelchairs, and more futuristic technologies like electrically stimulated muscles and brain-computer interfaces.

For instance, during the BCI event (image above), participants—or “pilots” to use the Cybathlon lingo—that are paralyzed below the neck will be equipped with brain-machine interfaces that will enable them to control an avatar with their mind. The virtual avatar will compete in a horse or car racing video game.

 

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