Skip to content

The Medical Futurist: Weekly Introduction

Working as a speaker and consultant with medical technology, pharmaceutical and web companies; as well as universities and governments worldwide, my mission as The Medical Futurist is to make sure the advances of technology lead to a better healthcare for everyone!

I publish a daily newsletter about the future of medicine, manage a popular Facebook page about the future; launched a Youtube channel and share related news almost every hour on Twitter.

Here is my new book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine:

KONYVBORITO_online final s 350

I’m also the author of Social Media in Clinical Practice handbookand the founder of Webicina.com, a service that curates medical content in social media for medical professionals and e-patients.

I launched The Social MEDia Course, the e-learning format of my university course focusing on medicine and social media for medical students, physicians and also patients with Prezis, tests and gamification.

I hope you will enjoy reading Scienceroll.com!

There is no difference between the online and offline worlds

I got interviewed by Creation Healthcare in their Digital Key Opinion Leaders series. An excerpt:

Can you tell of a personal ‘valuable lesson learned’ about social media that you would like medical peers and students to be aware of?

My general rule of thumb is that there is no difference between the online and offline worlds. If there is something I would never do in the offline world, why would I do it online? I’ve been communicating online for at least 15 years by keeping this simple rule in mind.

What do you see (or hope to see) in the future of healthcare engagement and social technologies?

I want every medical professional and every empowered patient worldwide to feel connected to many others. Others who can help professionally or emotionally. When they have questions or just need a good word or support. Social media has the potentials to become this bridge between people.

ScreenShot

Tips to Make Your Digital Life Efficient (Video)

In the newest video of The Medical Futurist Youtube channel, I talk about how I rewired my social media profiles and my whole online presence to make digital life as efficient as possible. Using e-mails, Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and more!

See more videos here.

Digital Health Rockstars Who Helped Predict The Future Of Medicine

I was very lucky to have the chance to conduct interviews with dozens of experts when I was writing my book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine. I learnt from them and used their insights for shaping my views about how technology will dramatically change medicine and healthcare in the upcoming years. Here is a list of people who and companies that helped predict the future:

  • Professor Steve Mann, one of the first cyborgs
  • Chris Dancy, the most connected man
  • E-Patient Dave drBronkart, e-patient guru
  • Denise Silber, organizer of Doctors 2.0 and You.
  • Lucien Engelen, Director REshape Center for Innovation at Radboud University Medical Center
  • Dr. Catherine Mohr, Vice President of Medical Research at Intuitive Surgical, developers of the da Vinci surgical robot
  • Professor Robert S. Langer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Jack Andraka, inventor, scientist
  • Dr. Rafael Grossmann, surgeon futurist, Google Glass user
  • NerdCore Medical developing educational games in medicine
  • Blake Hannaford, Professor of Electrical Engineering, Co-Founder at Applied Dexterity Inc.
  • Jacob Rosen Ph.D., Professor at UCLA
  • Joel Dudley, Ph.D., Director of Biomedical Informatics at Mount Sinai School of Medicine
  • George Church, Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School
  • Edward Abrahams, Ph.D., President of the Personalized Medicine Coalition
  • Professor Takao Someya, Organic Electronics
  • Dr. David Albert, Founder & Chief Medical Officer at AliveCor
  • Professor Anthony Atala, Director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine
  • Organovo, bio 3D printing
  • Michael Molitch-Hou, Author at 3D Printing Industry
  • Ekso Bionics
  • Robert Hester, PhD, University of Mississippi Medical Center
  • Casey Bennett, Dept. of Informatics, Centerstone Research Institute
  • András Paszternák, Ph.D., founder of nanopaprika.eu
  • OpenBCI
  • Interaxon
  • Organizers of the first cyborg Olympic Games, Cybathlon
  • Davecat, the first technosexual
  • Ian Pearson, futurist

The Guide to the Future of Medicine ebook cover

5 Ways to Prepare The Doctors of The Future

Years ago when I was a medical student I felt that lexical knowledge was more important than actually being able to find the information I need. And now there are 23 million peer-reviewed papers on Pubmed.com so the skill of being able to find information is becoming even more important than ever.

I thought that medical curriculum should be redesigned in a way that now we can serve this new need for skills such as digital literacy. That is why I launched the world’s first university course focusing on social media, mobile health and the future of medicine. The course is still running with full house.

In my new video, I described methods that help us prepare students for becoming physicians who can take care of their patients in a technological world. Here is the video and then summaries of the 5 methods.

Developing e-learning platforms

I launched an e-learning platform for my students on which they can check all the presentations with hand-outs, data, studies, plus they can do the tests online. If they complete the tests online, they can skip the written exam.

The Social MEDia Course

The Social MEDia Course

Engaging students through social media

As all my medical students have Facebook accounts; challenges, tasks about online activities and questions about the topics covered during the lectures are posted every day during the semester on the Facebook page of the course and students with the most bonus points do not have to take the written exam. They fight against each other.

1

Gamification

The typical curriculum requires students to study texts and data by heart without proper reasoning and understanding the logic behind it. Instead, study through serious diagnostic games has clear advantages. The “Healing Blade” card game takes the player into a world of sorcery and creatures where real–world knowledge of infectious diseases and therapeutics play a pivotal role in the winning strategy. “Occam’s Razor” is a real diagnostic card game released by NerdCore Medical.

11

Creating a digital environment

I offer students the chance to interact with each other outside the curriculum online. If they need help in using a social media channel, they can find me online and I’m happy to help. With some of them, I’m still in touch even years after they completed my course. This way they can learn the tricks of online collaboration and it might be a simpler task when they have to do it as a part of their everyday job.

Rethinking the whole curriculum

At Radboud University Medical Center, they are currently working on a revolutionary new medical curriculum. The educational vision behind this transformation has been inspired by people all over the world who want to improve people’s lives through healthcare and education. In this system, each student has a personal coach. They work with a so–called open space technology in which students themselves decide what will be addressed when students and teachers meet. Currently, biomedical and medical students also work as consultants for pharmaceutical companies in an attempt to come up with innovative ideas. These young students still have a lot to learn, but it seems they learn very quickly when under pressure.

Please share what you think either as a student or a lecturer and read more about the future of medical education in my recent book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine!

The Guide to the Future of Medicine ebook cover

Wearable Predicting When You Need To Go To The Restroom?

I know a wearable revolution is going on, I use 20-30 devices myself, but it seems I can still be surprised. A new wearable that will launch its crowdfunding campaign soon will try to predict when you need to go to the restroom. They want to help elderly and disabled people by giving them enough time to find a restroom. I keep on wondering how it might work if it is not a hoax. An excerpt from the article by Mashable:

The rectangular device appears to be about the size of a business card and is worn over the abdomen, though it’s not clear from the video how users keep it in place.

The device tracks your, err, activity, over time; it will eventually learn more about your habits to provide more tailored notifications, according to the company. “You’ll no longer feel stressed about unpredictable bowel movements,” the video reassures you.

d-free

Here is the video:

Which Wearable Device to Choose? (Video)

As a geek, let me tell you it’s quite simple to fall in love with a gadget or device at first sight. Although the way we try to stay healthy should not be controlled by technology or gadgets but by being proactive in our own health.

As many subscribers asked me about how I choose my own wearable devices for tracking health, I thought I would share the quality features I take a look at first so then you can make an informed decision when purchasing a wearable tracker.

A few things I check:

  • Company behind the device
  • App is updated regularly
  • User reviews
  • Money-back guarantee
  • What do I want to measure
  • How to access data
  • How to export data
  • Is it compatible with my smartphone

Read more about health wearables in The Guide to the Future of Medicine.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 44,220 other followers

%d bloggers like this: