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Twenty-Two Trends Shaping the Future of Medicine: The List

My upcoming book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, will become available on Amazon.com in black&white paperback, colored paperback and Kindle formats in a few days, therefore I thought I would share an excerpt of the table of contents revealing what trends are featured and described in details through stories and a lot of pictures in the book.

Through these, I try to prove that we can use more and more disruptive technologies in medicine while successfully keeping the human touch.

Please feel free to comment on these trends here or by using the #medicalfuture hashtag on Twitter.

  • Empowered Patients
  • Gamifying Health
  • Eating in the future
  • Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality
  • Telemedicine and Remote Care
  • Re–thinking the Medical Curriculum
  • Surgical and Humanoid Robots
  • Genomics and Truly Personalized Medicine
  • Body Sensors Inside and Out
  • The Medical Tricorder and Portable Diagnostics
  • Do–It–Yourself Biotechnology
  • The 3D Printing Revolution
  • Iron Man: Powered exoskeletons and prosthetics
  • The End of Human Experimentation
  • Medical Decisions via Artificial Intelligence
  • Nanorobots Living In Our Blood
  • Hospitals of the Future
  • Virtual–Digital Brains
  • The Rise of Recreational Cyborgs
  • Cryonics and Longevity
  • What Will a Brand New Society Look Like?

The Guide to the Future of Medicine ebook cover

The Most Connected Man: Video

There is an amazing article about Chris Dancy, who I also interviewed for my upcoming book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, and who is considered the most connected man. Sometimes, I heard people commenting on his story/journey saying that he is focusing on technology too much and his case should not be an example for others.

Although I think he made it clear in this article why he is using a lot of wearables and sensors to make his life better.

“I’m the most connected man in the world to myself,” he says. “I’m not the most connected man in the world to technology. Technology was the route.”

AliveCor Receives FDA Clearance to Detect Atrial Fibrillation

I’ve been using AliveCor for over a year now and I think this is the best device for measuring 1-channel ECG. I’ve been saying that it should soon be available for use for patients as well. See their recent press release for the great news.

AliveCor, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted the company clearance for its algorithm to detect atrial fibrillation (AFib), the most common form of cardiac arrhythmia. AliveCor’s automated analysis process (algorithm) instantly detects if patients are experiencing AFib through real-time electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings taken on the mobile phone based AliveCor® Heart Monitor, so physicians can intervene before potentially life-threatening conditions, like strokes, occur. Through AliveCor’s ECG analysis service, patients can confirm their results with a U.S. board-certified cardiologist or a personal physician.

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The Guide to the Future of Medicine: See The Cover!

Here is the cover of my upcoming book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine. Only a few days left before it becomes available in paperback and e-book formats on Amazon.com.

Over one year of hard work, 70 interviews and 22 trends that will shape the future of medicine. My mission is to prove that it is possible to find a balance between using technologies and keeping the human touch in practicing medicine at the same time.

I cannot wait to hear what you think about it! Stay tuned for more details about the book in the coming days!

The Guide to the Future of Medicine ebook cover

Are There Limits of 3D Printing in Healthcare?

In only a few days’ time, one could read about the potentials of 3D printing in healthcare from different angles. Surgeons in Portugal recreated the tumor and surrounding tissue of a 5-year-old boy’s neuroblastoma using 3D-printing to be able to practice removing the tumor before trying again after failed attempts. In another story, a company tries to create a specialized filament and process for the 3D printing of medical pill capsules. More and more ideas appear online every day about how this technology could be used for medical purposes. Companies such as 3DSystems are in the forefront of innovation.

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The NIH is leading a 3D printing competition to find new ways of visualizing scientific and medical data and concepts that can enhance discovery and learning. Amazon just opened its 3D printing store therefore buyers can browse a variety of 3D printed products including jewelry, home decor, tech accessories, and more.

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With global doctor shortages and the lack of proper medical equipment in underdeveloped regions, this might be the time for a change in the way how we access these. What if we could just print out in 3D what we need from customized prosthetics to medical equipment? Scanners that create blueprint models of existing objects are already available. Now there are also search engines that let you find a 3D printer near you. 

What happens when it becomes possible to print out drugs? Patients don’t get prescriptions any more but only blueprints based on which they get the drugs printed out on demand at the pharmacy completely changing the landscape of the pharmaceutical industry.

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There are a lot of questions without an answer or solution now, therefore it is time to discuss these on a global scale. Use the #medicalfuture or #3dprinting hashtags on Twitter and please share what you think!

Giving a Keynote at HIC2014 in Melbourne

I’m flying to Melbourne to give a keynote at Australia’s premier digital health, e-health & health informatics conference called HIC 2014. My keynote, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, will feature directions medicine is heading at the moment accompanied by a guide to help everyone prepare for this future world. I’ll live tweet during the event through #hic2014.

See you there!

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Smart Socks, Necklace, Tattoo And Even Water Bottle: When Does It Stop?

Many times I wrote about the wearable gadgets that help me live a healthy life. I know there is a wearable revolution going on but some of the recent announcements make me think whether the list and range of such gadgets ever get rationale. A few examples from the past days:

  • Smart socks as fitness activity trackers
  • Smart water bottle to alert you to keep yourself hydrated: “The Hug solution includes a sensor band that wraps around just about any water bottle to track your H2O consumption, and an accompanying mobile app that reminds you to drink when your hydration levels are low.”
  • Smart ring controlling devices
  • Smart golf gloves and many more.

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The next ones would be smart ear rings and smart nail clippers? Hopefully not.

I cannot wait to reach the point when we get over this phase of hype and start focusing on meaningful developments.

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