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Posts tagged ‘Blogging’

How I Completely Re-Wired My Digital Life: 16 Tips

I’ve been massively active online for at least 10 years therefore I have built networks focusing on my favorite topics leading to a point where I invest my time into human intelligence instead of checking hundreds of article titles every day. Although, as others, I often face the problem of being efficient time-wise online as receiving thousands of social media messages a day makes it a real challenge.

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Now I share with you the experience I’ve had in the last 6 months as during that time I have completely re-wired how I use the internet for professional purposes and how I manage my digital life.

Dealing with e-mails: I have to deal with about 200 e-mails a day, the majority of them requiring action from me. I tag e-mails massively in Google Mail and have been teaching Gmail how to categorize my e-mails automatically (important ones, promotions, social media related e-mails, etc.). While some of my colleagues quit using e-mail, I think this is still my information HQ and the official communication channel to me. But I don’t start the morning any more by checking e-mails. Instead, I start the day with reading a chapter in a book. It gives me a great start, plus as my brain is the most active in the early hours, I can learn a lot. After that, I deal with e-mails at specific time periods, otherwise I couldn’t focus properly.

Facebook: I use Facebook for professional purposes and before this time, Facebook was proven to be absolutely useless. But I changed my strategy and unfollowed (hiding their posts from my stream) cc. 1400 out of my 1600 followers. At the same time, I started following about 100 pages focusing on social media and the future of medicine. It means now my Facebook stream is almost free of noise but full of useful information.

Google+: The main streams of my Google+ network are very much hectic, but the communities of Google+ focusing on my areas such as the future, medicine and social media are priceless. Those are the most curated information streams I check every day.

Twitter: This is my key and fastest communication channel. In my experience, people using Twitter can be approached much easier through their Twitter account than via e-mail. As Twitter messages should only contain real information (no garnish), I can respond in seconds. I use Tweetdeck for organizing my streams and get the most important filtered news out of my focused groups easily. Symplur helped me organize topics with new hashtags such as #medicalfuture or #HCSMcourse.

Hand holding a Social Media 3d Sphere

Linkedin: This is my most professional channel. I’ve been working on improving my profile there for years which resulted in an “All-Star” profile as ranked by LinkedIn. I paid for the premium service showing me those who check my profile and might be potential clients. It also puts my profile high up in search results. It is connected to my blog automatically.

Blogging: This is one of the activities I enjoy the most even after 7 years (have written over 5000 blog entries). To be honest, I still use bookmarks for storing the topics I would like to write about and dedicate at least 5 hours a week to blogging. Whatever project I come up with, I can reach thousands of very relevant people with only one blog entry. My blog is a golden mine for me.

The Ultimate Online Resource: I thought I had so many online channels I needed a professional website serving as an umbrella above all those channels. Medicalfuturist.com now shows all my active channels featuring Scienceroll.com and Twitter.com/Berci; and the Medical Futurist Newsletter let me build a network of people interested in the future of medicine. This is now my digital public HQ.

Organizing short- and long-term tasks: One of the toughest challenges I face is organizing the many tasks, projects and jobs I have. The reason why is that although I have thousands of meetings a year and travel a lot, I don’t work in an office and don’t have access to an intellectually rich community in my everyday life. Therefore I have to create this ambiance around me. I use a Google Document with color codes and different sections showing me the tasks of today, of tomorrow, of this week and of this month. Every 4 weeks, I sit down and analyze the long-term goals (months-years) and assign new tasks to my everyday life. This is crucial in order to put effort into things that really matter. This system now makes sure I keep being motivated without artificial or external inputs.

Just before deadline

Bookmarks: When you save tens of thousands of links, a traditional bookmark is not enough any more. The links I might need later are saved and categorized by bit.ly (as I shorten almost all the links I share). By creating bundles, it lets me organize these links in a convenient way.

Web browser: About 2 years ago, I switched from Firefox to Google Chrome and I have no idea why I didn’t start using it earlier. All the devices I use (PC, laptop, tablet and smartphone) have Chrome and it automatically synchronizes my settings, bookmarks and browser history. It makes my life easier.

Automatic updates: There are pieces of information I need to collect through non-structured channels such as search engines. As I don’t have to go back and search for the same things again and again, I use Google Alerts for getting updates about certain topics; and use Pubmed.com‘s Save Search function to get peer-reviewed papers automatically focusing on my areas.

Feedly: While some people think RSS is so web 2.0-ish, I couldn’t live without it as my information resources would be hectic while I need a very much structured way of following resources. Feedly lets me organize websites into categories and now I follow 430 resources easily.

Improving cognitive skills: I’m a huge fan of life-long learning as I believe improving my cognitive skills should be a priority at any point in my life. When I came across Lumosity, I knew I found what I’d been looking for. I’ve been using it for 5 months and I can feel how better I’m at different tasks that require good memory, speed, flexibility or other skills. It only takes 5 minutes a day. When I have to wait somewhere, I grab my phone and use Dr. Newton, a game for improving cognitive skills therefore I always try to do something useful for my brain.

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Focus: Dealing with hundreds of messages and thousands of pieces of information is one thing, but the projects I work on require real focus. In order to make it easier for myself, I use time frames for different tasks (such as checking e-mails or using Twitter) every day and keep other timeframes free for tasks that require real focus. Focus@Will has been proven to facilitate this for me.

Learning new things: No matter, how limited my free time is, I must constantly try to learn new things. As I have wanted to learn to speak Spanish for years, I decided to download Duolingo and follow its instructions as it teaches languages in a gamified and interesting way. I love it.

Physical activities: I cannot work efficiently without living a healthly life and being physically active. I use the wearable Shine to make sure I exercise enough every single day and do include the exercises I have to do every day in my Google Document. I realized I really accomplish things and tasks that are in my time-management Google Document and adding the details of doing physical activities as such tasks to that as well turned out to be a great solution for motivating myself.

I hope this experience of over 6 months will help you be more efficient and successful in your personal and digital lives as well!

Scienceroll.com: Weekly Introduction

I would like to share my favourite and ongoing projects with you so I can give you a proper introduction to Scienceroll.com.

Medicine 2.0 University Course: This is the second semester of the first university course that focuses on web 2.0 and medicine for medical students. Last semester, almost 50 students attended the 20 slideshows through 10 weeks and they filled a survey out before and after the course. I launched the second semester for English-speaking students (February – May, 2009). I’m open to launch the same course in Second Life.

Medicine20 Course 4 by you.

Medicine 2.0 Collection: I maintain the biggest collection of links and posts focusing on web 2.0 and medicine.

Webicina.com is my service that aims to help medical professionals and patients enter the web 2.0 era by providing them with e-courses, consulting and personalized packages.

PeRSSonalized Medicine is a free tool that lets you select your favourite resources and read the latest news and articles in one personalized place. You can create your own “medical journal” and as we are totally open to suggestions, let us add the journals, blogs and websites that you would like to follow.

Webicina.Com

Diabetes 2.0 Package: If you would like to know which web 2.0 tools can provide support or reliable health information, which communities to join and which quality blogs to read, this personalized package is made for you.

Webicina.Com

Scienceroll Search is a personalized medical search engine powered by PolyMeta search and clustering engine. You can choose which databases to search in and which one to exclude from your list. It works with well-known medical search engines and databases and we’re totally open to add new ones or remove those you don’t really like.

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Medicine 2.0 Blog Carnival and Microvarnival: The blog carnival focusing on web 2.0 and medicine. Let me know if you have a submission or if you want to host an edition.

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Gene Genie is the blog carnival of genes, personalized genomics and gene-related diseases. Our plan is to cover the whole genome before 2082 (it means 14-15 genes every two weeks). Let me know if you have a submission or if you want to host an edition.

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List of biomedical and scientific community sites: More than 30 communities with links, descriptions and screenshots.

List of Biomedical video sites: Almost 40 sites featuring scientific or medical videos and videocasts.

Gene Genie #43 at Pharmamotion

The  43rd edition is up at Pharmamotion. A great compilation of articles and blogposts about human genetics and personalized medicine. Thank you, Flavio Guzman, for hosting Gene Genie.

Gene Genie is the blog carnival of genes and gene-related diseases. Our plan is to cover the whole genome before 2082 (it means 14-15 genes every two weeks). We accept articles on the news of genomics and clinical genetics. The news and articles of personalized genetics are also included. Check out Gene Genie for more about this unique field of medicine.

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Many thanks to Ricardo Vidal for the logo!

Don’t forget to submit your articles via e-mail (berci.mesko at gmail.com).

Let me know if you would like to host an edition.

Here are all the issues of Gene genie:

Medicine 2.0 Carnival #35: Twitterity

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Medicine 2.0 is a blog carnival aiming to analyze and describe the impact of web 2.0 on medicine and healthcare. We, bloggers, believe web 2.0 can change the way medicine is practiced and healthcare is delivered.

Let’s launch the carnival with articles on medical search.

Medical Search:

On Walter Jessen’s Highlight HEALTH 2.0 blog, Hope Leman had a guest post: Mednar Search … and Hope said, “It is good.

AltSearchEngines reviewed the Health 2.0 Conference – Day 2.

Googling for Life Scientists – Patricia F. Anderson, Librarian (UBC Academic Search – Google Scholar Blog)

Twitter:

Top U.S. Hospitals Are On Twitter (Clinical Cases and Images)

Twitterview: The Future of Medicine in 140 Characters (Scienceroll)

Twitter a Healthcare Marketing Tool? Maybe. (Health Leaders Media)

Construct your own ‘Top 10 Must Follow’ List as it relates to your own Niche (TwiTip): The link leads to the top 10 medical twitterers.

Omnee: An organic directory of Twitter users (Scienceroll)

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Telemedicine:

Telehealth and EMRs – How can Physicians Use these Tools? (Canadian EMR)

Convergence of Health 2.0 and medical home? (HealthBlawg)

OpenECGproject: Open Source for Electrocardiography (Scienceroll)

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Blog:

10 blogging myths debunked from a medical blogger perspective (Clinical Cases and Images)

Work for Nature, Go to SciFoo (Nascent)

Health 2.0:

Video: Dr. Jay Parkinson’s presentation about HelloHealth (Clinical Cases and Images)

Top Physician Recommended Health Sites on the Web (Chris Pirillo)

The “Last Mile“ (The Last Mile of healthcare Consumerism)

Health 2.0: Are We On The Same Page? (Mark My Words)

From search to transactions: Americans move along the eHealth continuum (Health Populi)

The Doctor Will E-Mail You Now (Newsweek)

Health 2.0: Patients on Social Networks (BusinessWeek)

The New Examined Life (WSJ)

OrganizedWisdom Interview with Health 2.0 Conference Co-founder Indu Subaiya (Health 2.0)

Medicine and health 2.0:

The Bridge: Do you want to change healthcare? (Scienceroll)

United Health Jumps Into Consumer Fray (Chilmark Research)

Healthcare Goes Mobile:

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Practice Fusion: a growing Electronic Medical Records community.

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If you want to host an issue of Medicine 2.0 in 2009, let me know (berci.mesko [at] gmail.com). Don’t forget to submit your articles (berci.mesko [at] gmail.com).

You can also follow me on Twitter or follow the room of Microcarnival room of Medicine 2.0 where all the posts are published.

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