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Posts tagged ‘Education’

Medical Specialties That Can Benefit from Google Glass

I’ve been writing about the potentials Google Glass might have in healthcare (see the list below the image) and now here is a great article describing some examples and medical specialties that could benefit from using it the most.

  1. Wound care
  2. Surgery
  3. Anesthesiology
  4. Intensive Care
  5. Emergency Response

I would definitely add medical education to the list. Now students don’t have to look over the shoulder of the surgeon but actually can watch what the surgeon is really seeing right now on huge HD screens.

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Here are some other articles dedicated to this issue:

 

Here Is The World’s First Masters Degree in 3D Bioprinting

It is not surprising that universities are ready to take steps into obvious directions of technological advances such as 3D printing. Two Australian, a Dutch and a German university just created the world’s first masters degree program that will allow students to claim that they are masters of biofabrication.

Such bold moves truly show how education must change in order to meet today’s needs.

The two year program gives students one Master’s degree in Regenerative Medicine & Technology from one of the above Australian universities and one of the above European universities. QUT’s biofabrication research has become famous for 3D printing bioink scaffolds infused with a patient’s stem cells to help a woman grow a new breast after a mastectomy.

masters-degree-in-3D-bioprinting-Associate-Professor-Mia-Woodruff.

Medical Students At UC Irvine Get Google Glass

The UC Irvine medical school in California made a good decision and started experimenting with using augmented reality in the classrooms by giving medical students Google Glasses which might help them with anatomy, clinical skills, and hospital rotations.

As someone living with such digital technologies, I have to say if it is used in the right way, it will truly improve their chance for better studying the art of medicine, as well as their scores. Why not incorporating these in the traditional curriculum if they can add clear value to education?

Irvine will be the first medical school to fully incorporate Glass into its four-year curriculum. Its first- and second-year students will use the device in their anatomy and clinical skills courses, while third- and fourth-year students will wear Glass during their hospital rotations.

“I believe digital technology will let us bring a more impactful and relevant clinical learning experience to our students,” UC Irvine’s dean of medicine Dr. Ralph V. Clayman said in a statement. “Enabling our students to become adept at a variety of digital technologies fits perfectly into the ongoing evolution of healthcare into a more personalized, participatory, home-based and digitally driven endeavor.”

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Disruptive Technologies in Medicine: Preparing Medical Students For The Future!

I’m very excited to announce that this semester we launch a new course, “Disruptive Technologies in Medicine” with Professor Maria Judit Molnar MD, PhD, DSc, the scientific Vice Rector of Semmelweis University. Our plan is to prepare medical students for those future technologies they will face by the time they start actually practicing medicine. I want to persuade them that the relation between the human touch and technologies is AND instead of OR.

Here are the topics we will cover with experts.

  • How Exponential and Disruptive Technologies Shape The Future of Medicine
  • Personalized Medicine – Genomic Health
  • Point of Care Diagnostics
  • The Future of Medical Imaging
  • Social Media in Medicine
  • Harnessing Big Data in Healthcare
  • Biotechnology and Gene Therapy
  • Mobile Health and Telemedicine
  • Regenerative Medicine, Optogenetics and 3D Printing
  • Medical Robotics, Bionics, Virtual Reality, and Future of Medical Technologies

We are going to teach them offline and online at the same time with plenty of assignments and interesting projects such as collaboration with the students of the course of Kim Solez at University of Alberta.

Feel free to follow all the developments and announcements of the course on Facebook. All the seats are already taken by international students. This is going to be an amazing semester!

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Simulations from the Future of Cardiology

Cardiology is a key area that could use some refreshments regarding the tools and devices used to teach its anatomy and physiology in the medical curriculum.

Based on a patient’s CT scan and using a mix of stereo lithography and other prototyping techniques, xCardio creates a copy of a human heart that is anatomically correct both inside and out.

While the main purpose of a new game, Relive, is to increase the awareness about CPR and push people, especially teenagers and young adults, to take a CPR class and be prepared to intervene in case of need.

 

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See 6 Reasons Why I Wish I Was a Medical Student Now and how Synthetic Human Cadavers could be used in medical education.

 

6 Reasons Why I Wish I Was a Medical Student Now

When I was a medical student between 2003 and 2009, I studied from mostly old books, I didn’t have access to much e-learning materials or lectures from other medical schools; it was particularly hard to collaborate with fellow medical students worldwide in the early days.

Now, we are living extraordinary times and when I realized I wish I was a medical student these days, I thought I would share my reasons for that.

1) Social Media:

The networks I’ve been creating in my fields of interest on Twitter, Google+, Facebook and the blogosphere are capable of filtering the most relevant news for me; helping me crowdsource complicated clinical/scientific questions; or provide me with updates and news every single day. Practically, I have access to a global community including the key people in my area and I can ask them questions and collaborate with them without borders. Moreover, I could learn about these pretty easily.

Hand holding a Social Media 3d Sphere

2) Studying Through Gamification:

I hated studying texts and data by heart without proper reasoning and logics behind that, but in many cases, that’s what the curriculum required from me. Instead, I prefer studying through serious diagnostic games such as the ones published by NerdCore Medical. I just received the Healing Blade card game that teaches infectious diseases; and the Occam’s Razor that is a real diagnostic card game.

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3) Improving Cognitive Skills:

For the last 3 weeks, I’ve been using Lumosity to improve my cognitive skills in many areas from flexibility and problem solving to memory and speed. The change has been incredible. I found out I can learn things faster and do multi-tasking even more efficiently by learning new methods and solutions.

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4) Gathering Information:

It has never been so easy to gather the information you need in an automatic way. I’m subscribed to over 400 medical RSS feeds and check news on Feedly, PeRSSonalized Medicine keeps my up-to-date, I have automatic Google Alerts for different search queries from my name to my field of interest; I get papers from Pubmed by e-mail; my citations are automatically sent to me by Google Scholar and I could go on for hours how much relevant information I receive every day without spending time and efforts on websites.

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5) Organizing Tasks in the Cloud:

For the last 4 years, a detailed and color coded Google Document has been helping me organize my tasks, projects, papers, publications and presentations in a perfectly precise way. I don’t have to take notes on paper or on different smartphones, but everything related to my work is in one document stored in the cloud.

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6) Using Gadgets:

I use a Shine to track my physical activities, I use AliveCor for measuring ECG and there are more and more medical gadgets on the way which will play a major role in the near future of healthcare. I would have a chance now to learn how to use them because by the time I should start practicing medicine and patients would bring their data through these, it would be late.

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I hope today’s medical students realize these potentials and leverage their power.

 

Google Glass in the OR and in Medical Education: Becoming a Disruptive Technology

It’s not the first time I say Google Glass can be the biggest hit in medical technology this yeas, and now as the number of good examples is still rising, it’s becoming more and more evident. Here are a few cases and experiments.

Rafael Grossmann, MD, FACS had a pilot project with this team about the use of Google Glass in medical education. Here is his summary:

We worked in three basic forms; first, a critical care LoM RN, emergently treating a patient and requesting advice from a remote GoogleGlass Surgeon. The second scenario involved the G-Glass Surgeon, remotely teaching a procedure to a group of students (PA’s, medical students and EMS students); here, the instructor is hands-free, concentrating on the actual procedure and the different steps to make it easy for the students to learn. The third one was a clinical situation where a request for advice was placed to a remote GoogleGlass cardiologist, my good friend and colleague, glass Explorer pioneer Dr. Christian Assad (@Christianassad), whom was able to give his expertise to the provider in need, from a remote location, wearing GoogleGlass in a Hang-out. Unfortunately, When Dr. Assad gives his advice to the me through GoogleGlass, you are not able to appreciate that on the video, since the audio comes to the GoogleGlass user by the way of bone conductivity.

And the videos:

It seems there are serious technical issues, but that’s always the case with disruptive technologies.

Lucien Engelen and his team at REshape created a video that shows what a regular patient-doctor interaction would look like with the Google Glass and what additional features it could add to the process:

Just one more thing. Get prepared for more and more applications/services based on Google Glass. I recently came across GlassFit that guides you safely through a circuit of workouts while helping you keep track of your full set of workouts. We can also expect to see more and more examples when patients use it in their health management.

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If the majority of the technical issues related to the use of Google Glass can be worked out, it’s going to be a real hit in medical technology. I cannot wait to get mine and test it in medical education.

 

Medical Education in 2009

How should medical education change in 2009? Unfortunately, I don’t have the answer but am trying to find sites and projects that could probably answer the question soon.

First, I will re-launch my university credit course focusing on web 2.0 and medicine in 2 weeks. I will also publish all the slideshows and try to persuade students to participate actively in this movement. I hope I can generate some discussions about how to reform medical education with this initiative.

Second, according to a Medscape article we will see a few changes in the near future at least in medical publishing:

Why is it, then, that medical publishers can retain copyright and limit access? Recently, pressure from proponents of the open-access concept has resulted in the emergence of some open-access publication models. For example, several publishers now allow full-text access after a defined period of time, such as 1 year after publication. Should physicians and their patients have to wait 1 year before access to important medical advances? I think not.

We need leadership to push for immediate, full-text access to all clinical literature and we need that leadership now. To paraphrase a mentor, “Knowledge [should] be in the domain of the seeker.”

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Third, the Medical Education Evolution project is still active and looking for contributors. If you have a great educational site in mind, please add it here.

Fourth, the Meducation site can provide you with some great resources on medical education.

meducation

Fifth, you should also check out the Medical Education wiki.

Further reading:

Twitter and Medical Education: Slideshow

Dr. Shock posted a more than interesting slideshow about the educational implications of Twitter created by Befitt who has already published other similar slideshows.

Further reading:

Medical Education Evolution: Looking forward to 2009!

This July, Jen McCabe Gorman, Ted Eytan, and me created a Ning community for those who are interested in changing medical education. We’re working on a new concept and plan to find a medical school that would use it. Feel free to join us and let us know your thoughts.

The community now has 95 members and 22 ongoing discussions.

As some of us organize university courses about medicine 2.0 or health 2.0 (e.g. my course in Debrecen) and as the Google Document containing the database of useful medical links is still growing, I can’t wait to see the results in 2009. This document features now almost a hundred sites, services and projects. Include your favourite websites!

I hope we can build a concept on how to reform medical education worldwide with the tools of web 2.0.

Let’s work even harder for a better education in 2009 (as Sir Ken Robinson described):

Further reading:

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