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Posts tagged ‘Health 2.0’

Mayo Clinic Chiefs Name E-Patient Dave as 2015 Visiting Professor

Wonderful news! E-Patient Dave, the leader of the global e-patient movement who gave a talk last year at my Social Media in Medicine university course as well, was named Visiting Professor for Mayo Clinic.

Patient engagement and empowerment is a natural extension of Dr. Will Mayo’s vision of a medicine as a cooperative science. We are therefore honored to announce Dave deBronkart (aka “e-Patient Dave”) as our 2015 Visiting Professor to help spread this powerful message. We look forward to his March, 2015 visit!

Philips to Enroll Hereismydata™ Worldwide

My mentor and good friend, Lucien Engelen, Director of the Radboud REshape Innovation Center did it again! He transformed a great idea that can save a lot of lives globally into an actual product or service. Today, he announced that Philips will start enrolling Hereismydata worldwide in front of 140.000 people at the 3rd biggest IT event of the world, “Dreamforce” of Salesforce.com.

We at Hereismydata™ are creating a one-stop-and-go place to store your data. Secure, robust and you in control. Connecting apps and devices, creating clinical modules like the COPD module with Philips, and connecting services like Apple’s healthkit and (lateron) Google Fit and back and forth EMR’s will help to create insight in the patchwork of data out there.

They start with COPD but will add many more conditions soon. Combining all kinds of vendors, operating systems, and languages as well as local legislation issues that have been tackled creates the ecosystem he envisioned long ago.

This video explains how it works.

My Book, Social Media in Clinical Practice, To Be Released on the 8th of August!

It’s a huge pleasure to announce that my book, Social Media in Clinical Practice, will be published by Springer on the 8th of August. Here is the Amazon link where you can pre-order it.

In the last 10 months, I’ve been working day and night to finish a book that could fill a huge gap regarding the practical use of social media in medicine and healthcare. Social Media in Clinical Practice was meant to introduce medical professionals to the digital world through real-life examples, suggestions and step-by-step instructions from blogs and Twitter to mobile apps and e-patients.

I’ve been teaching medical students and physicians about digital literacy for years, but in many cases, they wanted to learn more using a real book instead of e-learning materials.

I hope medical professionals will find this book useful and e-patients will share it with their doctors. An excerpt from the abstract:

Social media has been clearly changing the way medicine is practiced and healthcare is delivered. Medical professionals must be able to meet the special needs of technology-aware patients and use digital technologies in their work and communications properly. Each physician should find the tools that will assist them in their workflow, and patients need to be educated how to use the internet. It is the responsibility of medical professionals to contribute to this process.

The constantly evolving digital world must be used in the practice of medicine to improve the care of patients. However, the only way to do so effectively is via evidence-based, meaningful and strategic use. Social Media in Clinical Practice provides practical guidance in this mission and is thus essential reading for all medical personal looking into approaching this for the first time.

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Here is the table of contents:

  1. Social media is transforming medicine and healthcare
  2. Using medical search engines with a special focus on Google
  3. Being up-to-date in medicine
  4. Community sites Facebook, Google+ and medical social networks
  5. The world of e-patients
  6. Establishing a medical blog
  7. The role of Twitter and microblogging in medicine
  8. Collaboration online
  9. Wikipedia and Medical Wikis
  10.  Organizing medical events in virtual environments
  11. Medical smartphone and tablet applications
  12. Use of social media by hospitals and medical practices
  13. Medical video and podcast
  14. Creating presentations and slideshows
  15. E-mails and privacy concerns
  16. Social bookmarking
  17. Conclusions

E-patients will shape the future of medicine: Slideshow

Here is the slideshow I presented at the AcuteZorg.nl Health 2.0 event in Nijmegen, The Netherlands on the 24th of March, 2009.

h20tv.com: Share your ideas about reforming healthcare

The Health 2.0 Network just launched h20tv.com, a site for videos about reforming healthcare. According to the call for submissions:

Are you dynamic and engaging? Do you have opinions on how the healthcare system can be changed and improved that you want to take straight to the President? Now is the chance to have your voice heard!

Now taking submissions of 2 minute videos, telling us (and the new administration) your concerns and ideas about the future of healthcare and Health 2.0.

h20tv

Quality of Medical Information Online: A Twitter Discussion

I had a nice discussion today with a few Twitterers including Jay Parkinson about the quality of online medical information. It started when I mentioned many great medical blogs are not accredited by HONcode, the Health On The Net Foundation, which is a non-profit organization with a mission to improve online health information quality. I try to summerize the keypoints of the discussion.

Pros:

healthdirectory

berci-quality

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abelphramboy

Trisha

Cons:

chilmark

dmitriy

jayparkinson

bydls

Then I found a publication, Indicators of Accuracy of Consumer Health Information on the Internet that states:

One hundred Web pages were identified and characterized as “more accurate” or “less accurate.” Three indicators correlated with accuracy: displaying the HONcode logo, having an organization domain, and displaying a copyright. Many proposed indicators taken from published guidelines did not correlate with accuracy (e.g., the author being identified and the author having medical credentials) or inaccuracy (e.g., lack of currency and advertising).

I believe patients seeking medical information online need guidance. Regarding tech blogs or art blogs, it doesn’t really matter who determines quality. But in the medical blogosphere, I think it’s crucial to have a neutral third party that works to assure quality and try to help patients how to find reliable content. So the conclusion is I’ll keep on promoting HONcode and will try to get all of my medical sites accredited (Scienceroll and Webicina are both accredited).

Further reading:

Twitter And Health 2.0: A Visual Story

The VizEdu team did an excellent job when they tried to visualize the connection between medicine and twitter. And they included my profile in the special slideshow which I really appreciate. Check this flash/show out. They’re also open to new suggestions so feel free to add new thoughts to the presentation.

twitter-health2-vizedu

Further reading:

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