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Posts tagged ‘Health’

A Fully Digital Hospital Opens in 2015

I just heard the news that the first fully digital (entirely paperless) hospital will open in Abu Dhabi in 2015. The clinic worked with experts from the famous Cleveland Clinic, the No. 4 ranked best hospital in the United States. This might be a good step towards changing the hospital experience not only for professionals working there but more importantly for patients to make it a place where they go to re-energize themselves.

“The fact that a unified medical record is going to exist will provide seamless communication, which means there is an opportunity for us to communicate back and forth with the main campus and elsewhere in the healthcare system, without having the patient have the responsibility of carrying paper,” Harrison was quoted in the article as saying.

The 13-storey LEED Gold-Certified facility in Al Maryah Island will have five Centers of Excellence: Heart & Vascular Institute, Digestive Disease Institute, Eye Institute, Neurological Institute, and Respiratory & Critical Care Institute, according to anEmirates 24/7 article. It will have 364 beds, five clinical floors, three treatment and diagnostic levels, 26 operating rooms, and 13 floors of acute and critical care units.

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1 Out Of 5 Americans Don’t Track Any Vital Signs

Without managing our health while being healthy it is impossible to significantly improve healthcare. I’ve already introduced the health trackers I have been using to stay healthy as an attempt of persuading people to do so.

Now Withings has come up with the report of a recent survey that had some worrying results.

  • Although 82% of Americans think tracking vital signs at home is important, one fifth of Americans do not track any vitals outside of the doctor’s office.
  • 75% of people would be open to checking their vitals at home if they were a part of a program that would save them money on health insurance premiums
  • Oddly enough, although 59% of respondents monitor their temperature with a thermometer, only 12% could recall it as a vital sign, unprompted.
  • Over 80% of patients recall their doctors taking body temperature, blood pressure, and heart rate.  Only 29% remember blood oxygen level being measured at their last check-up.

Obviously, better wearable gadgets are needed which make the whole process comfortable, simple and smooth.

Do you track any health parameters? If so, which ones? If not, why not?

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Update: Also, here is the infographic Withings has released (click on the image for the original one):

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A Wearable Health Tracker That Shocks You!

Have you found it hard to change lifestyle? Do you struggle going to the gym or waking up early? This wearable health tracker wristband called Pavlok will literally electrocute you into action. Would you use it? The founder explained how it works:

Sethi explains how Pavlok works with a simple example — the habit of waking earlier. “It sits on my wrist and at 6am it’ll vibrate. I can snooze it, but if I snooze it twice, it shocks me.”

Well, I’m ready to take actions in my life without such hardcore motivation tools. But there are certainly people who need some push to make the next step. This is sort of a push.

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The Long-Tail of Wearable Health Trackers

I’ve been featuring the wearable health trackers I use on a daily basis and I was glad to see and amazingly detailed analysis of all these biosensing wearables on the website of Rock Health. The number of trackers has been rising for the past months faster than ever before, therefore the real challenge is to choose which one to use for what purpose. The ultimate goal is to track meaningful health parameters constanly without feeling the disadvantages of wearing a device no matter how small or smart it is.

It’s a crowded market, but there’s a growing tail of opportunity for biosensing wearables. We’re also pretty confident this space will continue to develop as tech giants like AppleSamsung, and Googlestart playing in the sandbox.

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By the way, you can browse among these trackers in the database of Amazon.com.

Social Media in Clinical Practice: The Handbook

Springer published my book, Social Media in Clinical Practice, almost a year ago and since then, I have received an amazing number of photos about people holding the book, social media posts and e-mails from readers who found my handbook to be very helpful in their professional lives. While the content is fortunately still up-to-date, it seems the turn-around time for a new book is about one year as lately, the number of messages has dramatically increased.

Medical professionals worldwide shared their insights, experience and suggestions about using social media resources in medicine using my book’s examples. Therefore, I’d like to ask anyone who likes to discuss such topics to use the #hcsm hashtag on Twitter or contact me directly, I’m always happy to initiate new discussions.

Here you can check out the detailed descriptions of all the chapters.

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Apple or Google? Maybe WebMD?

It has been rumored that Apple would come up with something truly innovative related to the wearable health trackers. Then what they actually came up with was less then people expected. Days later, Google announced its Google Fit project. But maybe a third applicant could be the winner as WebMD just released its application and the mission statement behind the smartphone app is that we can measure more and more health parameters about ourselves, but what matters is how we interpret the data.

On Monday, WebMD launched a new program in its iOS app called Healthy Target that works with activity trackers like Fitbit and Jawbone, as well as glucometers and wireless scales, to aggregate and pull in health data.

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My Wearable Health Trackers: Withings

In this edition of my series about wearable health trackers that I use, I have described Tinké and AliveCor. Now let me share my experience of using Withings products. Withings has developed plenty of trackers from smart body analyzers and activity trackers to blood pressure monitor or baby scale. I’ve been using their Pulse activity tracker and the smart Blood Pressure Monitor.

The Pulse is really small, easy to wear, measures the number of steps I take, number of calories I burn, the distance I cover; and can measure oxygen saturation as well as monitor my sleep. The device can be controlled by a small button on the top, but also, and it is remarkably well-designed, by swiping my finger on the screen to change the parameters.

What I like the most is the sleep monitor functionality that helps me assess the quality of sleeping time. It shows me how much time it took to go to sleep, how much light and deep sleep I actually had.

 

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The Blood Pressure monitor is wireless, user-friendly (only has one start button), and makes proper measurements (I compared it to traditional devices). My only concern with that is the Bluetooth connection as every time when I want to initiate a measurement, I have to remove the device from my phone’s “Bluetooth connected devices” list and add it again. It is a bit frustrating, but it still causes less hassle than using old gadgets.

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Regarding the common Withings app (there is one app for all their devices), the visualizations of measurements could allow a smoother zooming, otherwise it provides what it has to provide.

As a company producing more types of health trackers, so far, Withings seems to be the best one taking design, functionalities and user experience into consideration.

My Wearable Health Trackers: Tinké

Let me introduce you to my ever growing collection of wearable health trackers. This time, here is Tinké which is the only fitness & wellness tracker that measures Heart Rate, Respiratory Rate, Blood Oxygen saturation and Heart Rate Variability. Here are some key features:

  • Android and iOS versions
  • Free shipping worldwide
  • Measuring long-term fitness and current wellness
  • It provides the accuracy of every measurement to learn how to do it better next time
  • No battery required
  • Easy to share results and monitor progress
  • Connected to iPhones and works via Bluetooth for Androids

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Watch the video as well:

My CNN Article: 10 ways technology will save your life in the future

I was invited to write an article about 10 ways technology will save our lives in the future for CNN.com and I was happy to do so. It was featured today on the main page of CNN. I hope you will find it useful. Here is the introduction:

The medical and healthcare sectors are in the midst of rapid change, and it can be difficult to see which new technologies will have a long-lasting impact.

Ideally, the future of healthcare will balance innovative medical technologies with the human touch. Here, I’ve outlined the trends most likely to change our lives, now or in the near future.

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Saving 170 Billion USD with Health IT: Infographic About Adherence

I recently worked as a consultant for a pharmaceutical company as they asked me to help them create a long-term digital strategy. In this work, I learnt about some new health IT developments and one of them seemed to be very interesting. It aimed at improving adherence through an online system.

They say the world could save 170 billion USD by using their patform based on survey-evidenced results and the estimated nonadherence-related health expenditures. Here is their brief description:

PraxisPlatform developed a proprietary, versatile, fully secure health care ICT platform on which it designs and manages patient adherence management programmes, pharmacy care programmes and non-interventional clinical studies for innovative and generic pharmaceuticals and medical devices. PraxisPlatform currently reaches 120.000 patients, 4.800 physicians and 100 pharmacies in Hungary.

PraxisPlatform has a proven track record of increasing patients’ adherence to medicinal treatment by 70-130 per cent (at 6/12 months) in chronic therapy areas such as hyperlypidaemia (high cholesterol levels), prostatic hyperplasia and breast cancer.

Here is the infographic they came up with (click on the image for larger size)

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I think there are some key conclusions of this:

  • It’s important to develop something that is scalable on many levels.
  • As adherence is a global problem, a locally proven method could work anywhere else.
  • The ICT behind a digital health development must be universal but flexible to local needs.
  • They are also ready to sell the know-how with legal wireframes, not only the service itself.

What do you think about it?

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