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Posts tagged ‘Healthcare’

The Future of Medicine in One Word Cloud

My book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, will become available on Amazon.com in black&white paperback, colored paperback and Kindle formats on the 2nd of September. After sharing an excerpt of the table of contents revealing what trends are featured in the book; here is a word cloud presenting the main concepts and companies that are also described in details through stories, interviews and a lot of pictures.

What would be your top 3 choices among these to read more about? 

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The Guide to the Future of Medicine: See The Cover!

Here is the cover of my upcoming book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine. Only a few days left before it becomes available in paperback and e-book formats on Amazon.com.

Over one year of hard work, 70 interviews and 22 trends that will shape the future of medicine. My mission is to prove that it is possible to find a balance between using technologies and keeping the human touch in practicing medicine at the same time.

I cannot wait to hear what you think about it! Stay tuned for more details about the book in the coming days!

The Guide to the Future of Medicine ebook cover

Are There Limits of 3D Printing in Healthcare?

In only a few days’ time, one could read about the potentials of 3D printing in healthcare from different angles. Surgeons in Portugal recreated the tumor and surrounding tissue of a 5-year-old boy’s neuroblastoma using 3D-printing to be able to practice removing the tumor before trying again after failed attempts. In another story, a company tries to create a specialized filament and process for the 3D printing of medical pill capsules. More and more ideas appear online every day about how this technology could be used for medical purposes. Companies such as 3DSystems are in the forefront of innovation.

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The NIH is leading a 3D printing competition to find new ways of visualizing scientific and medical data and concepts that can enhance discovery and learning. Amazon just opened its 3D printing store therefore buyers can browse a variety of 3D printed products including jewelry, home decor, tech accessories, and more.

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With global doctor shortages and the lack of proper medical equipment in underdeveloped regions, this might be the time for a change in the way how we access these. What if we could just print out in 3D what we need from customized prosthetics to medical equipment? Scanners that create blueprint models of existing objects are already available. Now there are also search engines that let you find a 3D printer near you. 

What happens when it becomes possible to print out drugs? Patients don’t get prescriptions any more but only blueprints based on which they get the drugs printed out on demand at the pharmacy completely changing the landscape of the pharmaceutical industry.

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There are a lot of questions without an answer or solution now, therefore it is time to discuss these on a global scale. Use the #medicalfuture or #3dprinting hashtags on Twitter and please share what you think!

Computers are better at diagnosing?

A new study analyzing the role of IBM’s supercomputer named Watson in medical decision making was just published in Artificial Intelligence in Medicine. While the most acclaimed medical professionals might keep some studies in mind, Watson can check millions of them quickly. Instead of fighting them, doctors should realize we need to include such solutions in the everyday medical decision-making processes.

Using 500 randomly selected patients from that group for simulations, the two compared actual doctor performance and patient outcomes against sequential decision-making models, all using real patient data. They found great disparity in the cost per unit of outcome change when the artificial intelligence model’s cost of $189 was compared to the treatment-as-usual cost of $497.

“This was at the same time that the AI approach obtained a 30 to 35 percent increase in patient outcomes,” Bennett said. “And we determined that tweaking certain model parameters could enhance the outcome advantage to about 50 percent more improvement at about half the cost.”

I’m very glad they added this message at the end:

“Let humans do what they do well, and let machines do what they do well. In the end, we may maximize the potential of both.”

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Disruptive Technologies in Medicine: Preparing Medical Students For The Future!

I’m very excited to announce that this semester we launch a new course, “Disruptive Technologies in Medicine” with Professor Maria Judit Molnar MD, PhD, DSc, the scientific Vice Rector of Semmelweis University. Our plan is to prepare medical students for those future technologies they will face by the time they start actually practicing medicine. I want to persuade them that the relation between the human touch and technologies is AND instead of OR.

Here are the topics we will cover with experts.

  • How Exponential and Disruptive Technologies Shape The Future of Medicine
  • Personalized Medicine – Genomic Health
  • Point of Care Diagnostics
  • The Future of Medical Imaging
  • Social Media in Medicine
  • Harnessing Big Data in Healthcare
  • Biotechnology and Gene Therapy
  • Mobile Health and Telemedicine
  • Regenerative Medicine, Optogenetics and 3D Printing
  • Medical Robotics, Bionics, Virtual Reality, and Future of Medical Technologies

We are going to teach them offline and online at the same time with plenty of assignments and interesting projects such as collaboration with the students of the course of Kim Solez at University of Alberta.

Feel free to follow all the developments and announcements of the course on Facebook. All the seats are already taken by international students. This is going to be an amazing semester!

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Social Media in Clinical Practice: Chapter 15, E-mails and Privacy Concerns

When I realized Springer made the individual chapters of my book, Social Media in Clinical Practice, available, I thought it would be useful for future readers to get some insights about each chapter one by one.

Here is the short summary of what you can read about and an excerpt of the fifteenth chapter, E-mails and Privacy Concerns:

E-mail or electronic mail is a method of sending and receiving digital messages online. This is one of the most common forms of online communication and while patients usually send simple questions via e-mail to their doctors, it might contain sensitive information which could lead to legal consequences if medical professionals do not know about such potential issues and the ways to avoid these.

  • The most common topics in patients’ e-mails include
  • The potential advantages and disadvantages of using e-mails in the doctor-patient relationship
  • A typical e-mail consists of these elements
  • Suggestions About Dealing with E-mails
  • Privacy Concerns in Social Media

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Chapters that have already been covered:

The Relation Between The Human Touch and Medical Technology: AND Instead of OR

I’ve been giving talks about the future of medicine for years and many times, part of the audience is worried about losing the human touch of practicing medicine by using more technologies. As a medical futurist, I want to make things clear here.

The relation between the human touch in medicine and disruptive innovations is and; instead of or as people tend to think. By losing the quintessence of practicing medicine, the real-life doctor-patient relationship, we would lose everything. Although without using innovative technologies, it is becoming more and more complicated (if not impossible) to provide proper care.

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When I was 10 years old, I volunteered in computer shops to learn the hardware part of PCs. That time a man kept on coming back to the shop as he was expecting a delivery of a brand new hard drive he ordered some weeks ago. It was a hard drive of 40 megabytes (yes, megabytes) and he told me he had no idea what he would do with so much space on his computer. After almost two decades we have over a zettabyte of information online. It is practically impossible to keep up with that without using proper technologies. Moreover, it doubles now every 12 months, and soon will double every 12 hours.

The real challenge here is finding a balance between these; and it’s easier than you would think. By preparing for what is coming regarding medical innovation for all stakeholders of healthcare, we get a chance to start working out the methods and solutions in time, therefore we can use more and more efficient and secure technologies in medicine without losing the human touch of the doctor-patient relationship.

This is the topic I cover in my new book which should be out in a few months’ time. Wish me luck!

 

 

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