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Posts tagged ‘Medicine’

Integrating Digital Literacy into Medical Education: AMMC Interview

I was asked by the Association of American Medical Colleges to share my opinions about digital literacy with their readers. I was glad to participate and one line of mine got quite an attention through their social media channels: “Today’s medical professionals must be masters of different skills that are related to using digital devices or online solutions.” I remain confident that is it the case today. They also included the thoughts of one of the best clinician bloggers worldwide, Bryan S. Vartabedian, M.D from the 33 Charts blog.

An excerpt from the interview:

Bertalan Meskó, M.D., Ph.D., a medical futurist who travels the world consulting and lecturing on digital literacy in health care, frames digital literacy as “the way that medical professionals can use digital devices as well as online solutions in communication with patients and their peers.” Meskó believes that “today’s medical professionals must be masters of different skills that are related to using digital devices or online solutions” and argues that mastering those skills “is now a crucial skill set that all medical professionals require.”

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The Guide to the Future of Medicine: Foreword by Lucien Engelen!

My book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, comes out on the 2nd of September and I’m happy to share with you the foreword written by Lucien Engelen, Director of REshape Innovation Center at Radboud University Medical Center. I got to know Lucien in person about 6 years ago and he has always been very kind to me giving me pieces of advice and suggestions related to transforming my visions into products and services. I consider him the No. 1. voice in the field of digital health worldwide. He has been consistently talking about the need for innovation and implementing his own visions into practice. This is really rare nowadays.

I knew from the time when I wrote the first words of my book that I would ask him to write the foreword. I cannot think of anyone else to introduce my readers to what I have to say in that book. 

Lucien wrote his own piece about this foreword on his widely popular Linkedin channel. An excerpt from that and the foreword:

In it you’ll find a lot of very interesting topics assembled into one place to guide you through your own journey. Since that is Berci’s biggest suggestion to you: start NOW exploring the world around you from an innovation perspective, find your own way, and choose your own battle.

My ‘prescription’ to you would be to read a chapter a day, digest it for another day, explore that area yourself for the day after, and then execute on it the next. But the chances you’ll read this book in one take are actually much higher, and that’s fine too. Next to this incredibly well written and overarching book, he’s also created a virtual landing space for the discussion on http://www.medicalfuturist.com. I really do hope to meet you there.

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The Future of Medicine in One Word Cloud

My book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, will become available on Amazon.com in black&white paperback, colored paperback and Kindle formats on the 2nd of September. After sharing an excerpt of the table of contents revealing what trends are featured in the book; here is a word cloud presenting the main concepts and companies that are also described in details through stories, interviews and a lot of pictures.

What would be your top 3 choices among these to read more about? 

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Twenty-Two Trends Shaping the Future of Medicine: The List

My upcoming book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, will become available on Amazon.com in black&white paperback, colored paperback and Kindle formats in a few days, therefore I thought I would share an excerpt of the table of contents revealing what trends are featured and described in details through stories and a lot of pictures in the book.

Through these, I try to prove that we can use more and more disruptive technologies in medicine while successfully keeping the human touch.

Please feel free to comment on these trends here or by using the #medicalfuture hashtag on Twitter.

  • Empowered Patients
  • Gamifying Health
  • Eating in the future
  • Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality
  • Telemedicine and Remote Care
  • Re–thinking the Medical Curriculum
  • Surgical and Humanoid Robots
  • Genomics and Truly Personalized Medicine
  • Body Sensors Inside and Out
  • The Medical Tricorder and Portable Diagnostics
  • Do–It–Yourself Biotechnology
  • The 3D Printing Revolution
  • Iron Man: Powered exoskeletons and prosthetics
  • The End of Human Experimentation
  • Medical Decisions via Artificial Intelligence
  • Nanorobots Living In Our Blood
  • Hospitals of the Future
  • Virtual–Digital Brains
  • The Rise of Recreational Cyborgs
  • Cryonics and Longevity
  • What Will a Brand New Society Look Like?

 The Guide to the Future of Medicine ebook cover

The Guide to the Future of Medicine: See The Cover!

Here is the cover of my upcoming book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine. Only a few days left before it becomes available in paperback and e-book formats on Amazon.com.

Over one year of hard work, 70 interviews and 22 trends that will shape the future of medicine. My mission is to prove that it is possible to find a balance between using technologies and keeping the human touch in practicing medicine at the same time.

I cannot wait to hear what you think about it! Stay tuned for more details about the book in the coming days!

The Guide to the Future of Medicine ebook cover

The Guide to the Future of Medicine: Let’s Prepare For The Future!

We are facing major changes as medicine and healthcare now produce more developments than in any other era. Key announcements in technology happen several times a year, showcasing gadgets that can revolutionize our lives and our work. Only five or six years ago it would have been hard to imagine today’s ever increasing billions of social media users; smartphone and tablet medical applications; the augmented world visible through Google Glass; IBM’s supercomputer Watson used in medical decision making; exoskeletons that allow paralyzed people to walk again; or printing out medical equipment and biomaterials in three dimensions.

Medical Doctor holding a world globe in her hands as medical network concept

 

It would have sounded like science fiction. Sooner or later such announcements will go from multiple times a year to several times a month, making it hard to stay informed about the most recent developments. This is the challenge facing all of us.

Based on my white paper and CNN article, I decided to demonstrate where the world of medicine is heading in a a book which will come out late August. The Guide to the Future of Medicine will feature 22 trends and technologies that will shape the future.

My mission with the book is to prove that the relation between the human touch in medicine and using disruptive innovations is mutual. By losing the quintessence of practicing medicine, the real-life doctor-patient relationship, we would lose everything. Although without implementing innovative technologies, it is becoming more and more complicated (if not impossible) to provide proper care.

Therefore this new world requires preparation and new skills must also be acquired. I wrote this book to fulfill this mission. 

Here are some of the topics you will be able to read about soon everywhere online before the book comes out.

  • Health Sensors In and Outside The Body
  • DIY Biotechnology
  • Advanced Robotics
  • Artificial Intelligence in Medical Decision Support
  • Hospitals of the Future
  • Nanotechnology
  • The 3D Printing Revolution
  • The Rise of Recreational Cyborgs
  • and many more!

Let’s prepare for the amazing yet uncertain future of medicine together! #medicalfuture

 

Why Predicting The Future Is Not Possible Without Knowing Today’s Trends

Minsuk Cho, South Korean architect, curates an “epic-scale show about both Koreas” at this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale. One of the most exciting projects they present there is the result of how architects of North Korea designed the future of houses and cities without actually ever leaving the country or studying about other city design in details.

Look what kind of futuristic concepts they came up with while, for instance, keeping the old types of phones alive, not really moving forward with the advances of technology.

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It clearly shows how important it is to stay up-to-date about how technology is advancing today in order to be able to make informed decisions and assumptions about the future.

This is why I launched a Facebook page under the name The Medical Futurist to curate and publish news, reports and analyses about the most important trends and technologies that will shape the future of medicine. Feel free to join the discussion there!

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