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Five Expectations For Patients About The Future of Medicine

The waves of technological changes coming towards us will generate new possibilities as well as serious threats to medicine and healthcare. Every stakeholder must prepare for these changes in order to reach a balance between using disruptive technologies in medicine and keeping the human touch. I remain confident that it is still possible to establish that balance and there are reasons for patients to look forward to the next few years in medicine. Here are 5 of them.

1) Health management: The vast majority of people only deal with their health when they get sick. It is due to the fact that it has been really difficult to obtain useful data about our health. Now, the wearable revolution produces a lot of devices that bring health data measurements to our homes. So far, only physicians and hospitals could measure parameters, but today anyone can. Whether it is ECG, blood pressure, pulse, oxygen saturation, EEG or sleep, devices which we can order online provide us with the chance of changing lifestyle based on informed decisions.

Such devices will eventually get smaller and cheaper, and we will hopefully only use them when it is of help.

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AliveCor measures ECG with a smartphone.

2) Partnership: Medicine is a paternalistic system with the doctor being on the top making decisions about the patients. The digital revolution has changed it dramatically as now information, devices and even studies became widely available to anyone with an internet connection. This newly formed partnership makes it possible to be equal with the caregiver and play an equal role in making decisions. This will create an ecosystem in which patients get more possibilities to take care of themselves, while physicians will get help from their own patients. Jackpot. Although, a very old system has to be deconstructed for this.

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3) Communities: Social media is not famous for connecting patients, but several stories proved its potential power in connecting patients with like-minded others. We have done discussed our health concerns with our neighbors before. Now we do the same online without limitations and physical boundaries. Blogs, community sites, forums, Youtube and Twitter channels focus on patients and let them have their voices heard. As Kerri Morrone Sparling said, her doctor is an expert but can only understand what she goes through every single day if he/she is diabetic, otherwise he/she can only guess.

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4) Access to data: The Blue Button movement and E-Patient Dave’s talks encourage people to understand how important it is to own your own health data. It is not only unbelievable but actually outrageous that many hospitals and practices cannot communicate online with each other. Moreover, in others, patients who want to get their own X-Ray image must provide an empty CD disk to get it in the era of digital revolution. As it is not rocket science, we can expect to see major steps forward in this area. Without proper health data, informed medical decisions cannot be made.

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5) Prediction and prevention: Never in the history of medicine patients have had that many opportunities to predict and actually prevent diseases. Anyone can order genetic tests that tell them what rare conditions and mutations they carry and what drugs they are genetically sensitive for. We are not far away from doing a blood test or sequencing genes at home. In this sea of opportunities, the activity and participation of patients are very much needed, In a few years’ time, we will have to deal with the problem of too many choices regarding wearable devices. What is required for making good decisions is knowledge about where we are heading; and skills to make our own assumptions.

If changes happen as expected, patients will benefit the most of a newly constructed and entirely better healthcare system.

My new book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, includes more details and an actual guide about how to prepare properly for the technological changes.

The Future Doctor Will Be A Moderator, Not A Sage: Change Is On The Way

There is a great article in The Irish Times about what the roles of future doctors should be. They quoted Dr. Eric Topol, Dr. Bryan Vartabedian and me based on my new book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine. I’ve been saying for long years that this patriarchal system of medicine with the physician on the top having access to all the medical information and the patient being a minor element should be dramatically changed and restructured.

With the advances of the global e-patient movement, there have been good steps but we need to take this hierarchy down to create a true partnership in which the physician using their medical knowledge and the patient dealing with their health management together can make the best potential decisions.

An excerpt from the article:

Dr Bertalan Mesko, in his recently published book The Guide to the Future of Medicine, says that ever-improving technologies “threaten to obscure the human touch, the doctor-patient relationship and the very delivery of healthcare”.

The doctor and medical futurist warns that these enormous technological changes could “wash away” the medical system as we know it and leave in its place a purely technology-based service without personal interaction.

“Such a complicated system should not be washed away. Rather it should be consciously and purposefully redesigned piece by piece,” Mesko argues.

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Twitter And Health 2.0: A Visual Story

The VizEdu team did an excellent job when they tried to visualize the connection between medicine and twitter. And they included my profile in the special slideshow which I really appreciate. Check this flash/show out. They’re also open to new suggestions so feel free to add new thoughts to the presentation.

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Further reading:

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