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Posts tagged ‘Video’

62 Science Fiction Movies in 4 Minutes!

The Singularity Hub shared a fantastic video about the 62 major science fiction movies from the early 20th century. A must-see for all sci-fi lovers!

Here is the complete list of movies mentioned in the video:

1902- Voyage dans la lune
1927- Metropolis
1929- Fraud in Mond
1931- Frankenstein
1933-The invisible Man
1936-The Devil Doll
1951- The Day the earth Stood still
1953- The War of the worlds
1956- Forbidden Planet
1956- Invasion of the Body Snatchers
1957- The incredible Shrinking Man
1960- The Time Machine
1960- The village of the damned
1966- Fahrenheit 451
1968- A space Odissey
1968- Planet of the Apes
1971- A Clockwork Orange
1972- Solaris
1973- Fantastic Planet
1974- Soylent Green
1977- Close encounters of the third Kind
1977- Star Wars: episode IV, a new hope
1979- Alien
1979- Stalker
1980- Star Wars: episode V, the empire strikes back
1982- Blade Runner
1982- E.T.
1982- The Thing
1982- Tron
1984- Terminator
1985- Back to the future
1985- Brazil
1986- The Fly
1987- Predator
1987- Robocop
1989- Back to the future II
1990- Total Recall
1991- Terminator II
1993- Jurassic Park
1995- Ghost in the Shell
1995- Twelve Monkeys
1997- Abre los ojos
1997- Cube
1997- Gattaca
1997- The fifht element
1999- The Matrix
1999- Being Jhon Malcovich
2001- Donnie Darko
2002-1988 Akira (Blu-Ray, remaster) not in release order
2002- Minority Report
2005- V for Vendetta
2006- Children of Men
2008- Wall-e
2009- Avatar
2009- District-9
2009- Moon
2009- Watchmen
2010- Inception
2011- Super-8
2013- Star Trek Into Darkness
2013- Gravity
2013- Her (only voice)

What Should Hospitals Look Like In The Future?

How do you start when the goal is to design the hospital of the future? When I was writing this chapter for my new book, The Guide to the Future of Medicine, I contacted talented architects, as well as organizations such as NXT Health focusing on this sensitive topic and shared my own views as well.

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Here are a few things from the top of my mind as excerpts from the book:

  • No waiting time will harden the lives of patients as cognitive computers will organize all the details of the healthcare system. It will direct people when and where to go by analyzing their records, and automatically responding to doctors’ notes and prescriptions.
  • Extrapolating from today’s trends, it is clear sophisticaed surgical robots will rule the scenes of operating rooms (ORs), although not all ORs will include surgical robots as there will still be operations that could not be performed using only robots.
  • Devices and equipment of radiology, surgery and many other specialties from CT scans to endoscopic technologies will be so small they would all fit in the OR.
  • Cameras will record every movement in the OR as robots will be controlled from a different, sometimes distant locations. Examples are already available, e.g. in the Radboud Medical Centre.
  • Using radiology images such as CT or MRI scans ot patients, surgeons will be able to look into the body and even organs of patients before the operation for better surgical planning and during the operation for more precise movements. Augmented reality in action.
  • It will only include materials that cannot be infected; flexible touchscreens featuring important health data will be around the bed which will be controlled by the patient.
  • The walls might include virtual reality to make sure the patient feels literally at home by showing them images and pictures from their home which they can upload to the system while lying in a hospital bed.
  • Waiting rooms will feature charging sets for wearable devices where data could also be exported before the visit.

Here is how NXT Health thinks about the future of patient rooms:

A canopy above the bed houses electrical, technical, and gas components, even a noise–blocking system. A Halo light box can be programmed for mood and light therapy, and also serving as screen to display clouds or the sky. The head panel contains equipment that can measure almost any health parameter unobtrusively while continually logging results. The footwall features a screen for entertainment, video consultations, and accessing whatever information the patient needs. Floors are made of low–porosity rubber that does not need chemical sealers and does not trap bacteria and other substances. In case of a fall it reduces impact.

To reduce potential infections all surfaces are made of solid materials that are often used in kitchen countertops. A light at the entrance reminds staff to wash their hands before entering the room. Information and data can be added to patient records here as well as at a control panel.

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Although not all advantages will be the consequences of ever improving technologies but a different kind of training for the staff:

The Walnut Hill Medical Center in Dallas has been referred to as the Apple experience hospital due to its design and innovative nature. Potential employees must take a psychological exam, and the application process is exceptionally tough. Patient greeting begin in the parking lot with complementary valet service. Inside, the staff follows the Ritz Carlton “15–5” rule meaning that a hospital employee must smile at the patient from 15 feet and greet them with a warm hello at 5 feet. All employees are trained to communicate properly with patients and their families. Patient rooms feature large windows that provide natural light and pleasuring views.

Read more about the hospital of the future and what examplary hospitals operate today in The Guide to the Future of Medicine.

And as a bonus, here is how people in the 1950s saw the future of hospitals:

The Top 9 Books About The Future Of Medicine (Video)

I really love reading and thought I would summarize those 9 books which I like the most focusing on the future of medicine, healthcare and technology. Please share your favorite ones with me!

See similar topics covered in The Medical Futurist Youtube Channel.

Dealing With The Information Overload (Video)

In the newest video of The Medical Futurist Youtube channel, I talk about how to tackle the information overload. Enjoy and please share your methods!

Just like you, every single day I face an ocean of information. It’s really hard to keep myself up-to-date in my fields of interest, it’s really hard to tackle the information overload. Although, I’ve been using some methods in order to let the information come to me instead of chasing that.

Cognitive Computers Making Physicians Better

A few days ago, I wrote an article about why artificial intelligence is the stethoscope of the 21st century. Now by including some more stories, I covered this important topic in my newest video. Check it out!

“If artificial intelligence can improve a chess player, it can also improve a physician.”

My Wearable Health Trackers: Viatom CheckMe

In this edition of my series about wearable health trackers that I use, I have already described TinkéAliveCor, Pebble, Tickr Run and Withings. Now here is a new device from Viatom Technology that I have been testing for some time now.

The team kindly sent me a CheckMe which I have been using to measure my body temperature, ECG, pulse, oxygen saturation and sleep almost on a daily basis. This is the first device I have used which includes so many measurements at once.

It can measure:

  • oxygen saturation
  • pulse
  • perfusion index
  • ECG including QRS distance and regularity
  • body temperature
  • sleep quality + oxygen saturation
  • physical activities
  • blood pressure (indirectly)

It gives feedback about the results with a happy or sad smiley indicating whether we should get checked ourselves with a medical professional based on a measurement.

Although the way I have to wear it for measuring sleep  quality is not really comfortable, the data it gives me are very much detailed, plus finally I could see how my oxygen saturation changes during the night.

To be honest, there might be prettier devices out there with better background light for the screen, but for me, the fact that I can measure all these vital signs in quite a good quality led to keep on using the device on a daily basis.

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I also talk about Viatom in two of my recent videos:

Why being proactive is crucial for your health?

You have to find your own way of staying healthy!

The so-called wearable revolution has just started and will see a huge number of home-diagnostic and monitoring devices coming to the market in the coming months and years, but being healthy starts with simple things. It should basically be about being healthy and happy. And the only way to achieve that is to be proactive finding your own methods.

Since 1997, I have logged basic parameters about my life including the time when I went to sleep and woke up; scores between 1 and 10 about my mental, physical and emotional well-being. I have logged these for over 6000 days and not one day is missing. It takes me about 2 minutes every day and I cannot even describe how much it have helped me shape my lifestyle, find ways to be more health and happy. I needed data to make these changes, but everyone has to find their own motivation.

Here is an example of how my scored have changed over the last 2 weeks.

I hate running therefore I use the Zombies Run application to motivate myself by being a zombie attack survivor looking for supplies and running away from zombies.

It doesn’t matter whether your method includes technology or social solutions, but you have to find your own ways to stay healthy. Without proper health management, even modern medicine cannot help us.

Please share your methods about how you try to stay healthy on the Facebook page and Youtube channel of the medical futurist.

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